Plastic Art – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 07:56:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://songhaizeng.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-138x136.png Plastic Art – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ 32 32 OMA designs a waste landscape exploring the potential of our daily waste https://songhaizeng.com/oma-designs-a-waste-landscape-exploring-the-potential-of-our-daily-waste/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 04:30:35 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/oma-designs-a-waste-landscape-exploring-the-potential-of-our-daily-waste/ Can sustainability go hand in hand with pleasure? The hospitality industry, in its approach to achieving user comfort and enjoyment, has traditionally been an antidote to sustainability. The proliferation of single-use plastic and copious amounts of waste ending up in landfills by the hospitality and tourism industry has long eluded ambitions of achieving a circular […]]]>

Can sustainability go hand in hand with pleasure?

The hospitality industry, in its approach to achieving user comfort and enjoyment, has traditionally been an antidote to sustainability. The proliferation of single-use plastic and copious amounts of waste ending up in landfills by the hospitality and tourism industry has long eluded ambitions of achieving a circular economy. However, the Potato Head hotel brand has gone to great lengths to pursue zero waste. Twelve years ago, he opened Potato Head Beach Club in Seminyak, Bali, as a tropical modernist creative village on a mission towards zero waste hospitality. Inspired by the tradition of duality and balance inherent in Bali, the brand, in its choices of designs, facilities, collaborators, practices and philosophy, is committed to reducing the waste it puts into discharge every year.




  • The landscape of waste presented in the main atrium of the exhibition Image: © Studio Periphery, courtesy of Potato Head and OMA






  • Installations suspended from the ceiling dialogue with the orchestrated chaos of waste lying on the ground |  Nothing is possible |  AMO |  STIRworld
    The installations suspended from the ceiling create a dialogue with the orchestrated chaos of the waste lying on the ground Image: © Studio Periphery, courtesy of Potato Head and OMA



An exhibition titled Nothing is possible charts the journey of Potato Head’s progress towards zero waste across all disciplines of design, creativity and culture. The three-month showcase is curated by longtime OMA brand collaborator and managing partner David Gianotten along with Shinji Takagi. Hosted at the National Design Center Singapore and opened alongside the recent Singapore Design Week (September 16-25, 2022), the showcase offers a key lesson in sustainability. Curation confirms that zero waste and the experience of comfort and pleasure are not mutually exclusive, and that creative efforts across disciplines can transform materials at the “end” of their life cycle into a reservoir of resources.



Photographs and videos capture the overwhelming volume of waste generated by our daily habits |  Nothing is possible |  AMO |  STIRworld
Photographs and videos capture the overwhelming volume of waste generated by our daily habits Image: © Studio Periphery, courtesy of Potato Head and OMA


The atrium of the 1000 m² exhibition space is transformed into an immersive landscape of waste illustrated with the help of objects, photographs and videos. Scattered across the floor in piles of rubbish including plastic, bamboo, wood, textile, glass and polystyrene waste, the overwhelming nature of the display captures the amount of waste generated by our daily habits. A somewhat orderly chaos of visual curation guides visitors to see beyond the surface of the waste and interrogate the aesthetics within.



Piles of morphing plastic waste are deposited on the floor of the exhibition space |  Nothing is possible |  AMO |  STIRworld
Piles of plastic waste are laid on the floor of the exhibition space Image: © Studio Periphery, courtesy of Potato Head and OMA


Contrary to the orchestrated disorder of the ground, are suspended from the ceiling of the installations made up of the same waste which is below. The compositions – reflecting the potential of our everyday waste – include a circular assemblage of bamboo stools, a series of chairs constructed from reclaimed plastic and everyday objects made from waste textiles, to name a few. -ones. At the center of this showcase is a fenestration pattern created using discarded wooden shutters. Projected onto a circular metal frame erected on the ground, the work takes place in the middle of the atrium, creating a dialogue between the waste landscape and its creative transformations. These works were designed by long-time Potato Head collaborators, including Indonesian architect Andra Matin, Catalan industrial designer Andreu Carulla, Jakarta design studio BYO Living, Bali-based environmental engineers Eco Mantra, American artist Futura, Japanese architect Kengo Kuma, British furniture designer Max Lamb, French director and photographer Thibaut Grevet, London design studio Toogood and the National University of Singapore.



  • Nothing is possible |  AMO |  STIRworld
    A key installation, sitting in the middle of the atrium space, is created using discarded wooden shutters Image: © Studio Periphery, courtesy of Potato Head and OMA






  • Juxtaposed to trash can displays, utilitarian objects made from the same waste |  Nothing is possible |  AMO |  STIRworld
    Juxtaposed with trash can displays, utilitarian objects made from the same waste Image: © Studio Periphery, courtesy of Potato Head and OMA



The exhibit also includes a timeline tracing Potato Head’s journey since 2010, including highlighting its zero-waste initiatives in Bali. The brand’s operating schemes are further elaborated through an open source presentation of the ongoing waste management program at Desa Potato Head, a resort town in Bali.

Further into the exhibition, installations by street artist Futura take over the courtyard space, creating an informal gathering space, while a circular gift shop placed at the exit showcases waste-based products and installations. recycled plastics.



  • The showcase invites visitors to see beyond the waste landscape and into the aesthetics of it |  Nothing is possible |  AMO |  STIRworld
    The showcase invites visitors to see beyond the waste landscape and into the aesthetics of it Image: © Studio Periphery, courtesy of Potato Head and OMA




  • Materials circularity chart tracing zero waste operations at Desa Potao Head |  Nothing is possible |  AMO |  STIRworld
    Materials circularity chart tracing zero waste operations at Desa Potao Head Image: © Studio Periphery, courtesy of Potato Head and OMA


Nothing is possible revolves around the mantra “Good Times, Do Good”. He promotes the idea that “there is no single global standard for sustainability and that sustainability is an ongoing exploration of new ways of creating and living based on available local resources and shared knowledge”. Potato Head and OMA, longtime collaborators, aim to amplify this principle by realizing a new world of hotel design that is not only comforting, but also caring. Additionally, Ronald Akili, Founder of Potato Head, shares, “Hospitality has long been the source of so much waste and destruction, but after years of commitment to doing better and making many mistakes along the way , we have discovered that it can be a force for good for the environment and local communities. Through collaborations with visionaries who share our mission to build a more sustainable future, we are able to approach each problem as a opportunity to do something beautiful.We hope our journey can inspire and facilitate change so that our industry can be sustainable.

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A Plastic Surgeon and a Master Pumpkin Carver Team Up to Give a Carving Class https://songhaizeng.com/a-plastic-surgeon-and-a-master-pumpkin-carver-team-up-to-give-a-carving-class/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 10:37:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/a-plastic-surgeon-and-a-master-pumpkin-carver-team-up-to-give-a-carving-class/ CHAGRIN FALLS, Ohio – For some, carving a pumpkin is more than two traditional triangles and a jagged mouth. Instead, it’s a work of art for those who have signed up for a pumpkin carving master class in Chargin Falls. Gregory Fedele, a plastic surgeon, and Deane Arnold, a world-renowned pumpkin carver, teamed up to […]]]>

CHAGRIN FALLS, Ohio – For some, carving a pumpkin is more than two traditional triangles and a jagged mouth. Instead, it’s a work of art for those who have signed up for a pumpkin carving master class in Chargin Falls.

Gregory Fedele, a plastic surgeon, and Deane Arnold, a world-renowned pumpkin carver, teamed up to host the workshop to teach people how to carve faces into gourds.

“I love Halloween,” Fedele said. “I’ve always loved Halloween. As a plastic surgeon, it all fits perfectly with making art and sculpting.”

The masterclass opens more doors than new skills with tools, but a community of carvers.

“It’s a community,” Arnold said. “Most of us know each other. We’ve worked together. We know each other’s work even though we haven’t met.”

Stella Kotsatosangelo appreciates the activity because it makes people smile.

“I just appreciate that. You take a pumpkin and the next thing you know, you turn it into something that makes people happy or smile or say, ‘Oh my God! It’s a pumpkin!’ It’s always been my favorite,” she said.

Arnold encourages anyone to take a course like this.

“People who didn’t expect to be able to do anything, or maybe were hesitant, walk away with a pumpkin that surprises them at how well they’ve done it,” Arnold said.

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Seventeen artists create artwork on buildings in Margate for ocean conservation campaign – The Isle Of Thanet News https://songhaizeng.com/seventeen-artists-create-artwork-on-buildings-in-margate-for-ocean-conservation-campaign-the-isle-of-thanet-news/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 10:32:18 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/seventeen-artists-create-artwork-on-buildings-in-margate-for-ocean-conservation-campaign-the-isle-of-thanet-news/ Artwork Rise Up Residency at Vicarage Place by ‘Hera’ Photo Frank Leppard Photos by Frank Leppard Brilliant artwork has started to appear on buildings in Margate in a bid to raise awareness of ocean conservation and the problems caused by plastic on and around our coastline Seventeen local and international artists are painting as part […]]]>
Artwork Rise Up Residency at Vicarage Place by ‘Hera’ Photo Frank Leppard

Photos by Frank Leppard

Brilliant artwork has started to appear on buildings in Margate in a bid to raise awareness of ocean conservation and the problems caused by plastic on and around our coastline

Seventeen local and international artists are painting as part of the Rise Up Residency project which officially begins today (September 25) and ends October 2, although some works have already been completed.

The project is led by Rise Up Clean Up and internationally acclaimed artist Louis Masai, based in Margate. It will conclude with a series of free workshops for residents on October 1 and 2, with the aim of inspiring the community of Margate to reduce plastic use and respect the ocean.

Artwork by Louis Masai on the Kent Tec building Photo Frank Leppard

Over the past two years, over 3,000kg of rubbish has been collected from Margate’s main sands, the majority of which is plastic and single-use packaging.

‘Hera’ Photo Frank Leppard

Island businesses have embraced art-led activism and partnered with residents as well as artists to offer workshops and events the first weekend in October to help everyone make their share to reduce waste.

Photo Frank Leppard

Each facility has dedicated partners, ranging from climate NGOs such as Sea Shepherd, to sustainable brands including NatraCare, a company producing eco-friendly product alternatives for periods, as well as a variety of local businesses and the National Cultural Center , People Dem Collective.

Working at Danesmead Terrace by ‘Dreph’ Photo Frank Leppard

Environmental and waste collection group Rise Up Clean Up Margate was founded by resident Amy Cook. She said: ‘We have embarked on a mission to clean up Margate’s beaches and protect our beautiful local coastline, ocean and native wildlife. However, it is not enough to clean up what people leave behind. We need real systemic change that seeks to eliminate the problem at the source.

Work at Drapers Mill by Lily Mixe Photo Frank Leppard

“I hope the Rise Up residency leads to changes in policy and actions that can help usher in an era where Margate goes single-use plastic free.

“Beyond this, I hope other seaside towns will follow and together we can help bring about real change and preserve our beautiful coastline for generations to come.”

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Works that can already be seen include that of lead artist Louis Masai on the Kent Tec building in Northdown Road and works by Lily Mixe at Drapers Mill, Hera -aka Jasmin Siddiqui’ – at Vicarage Place and Neequaye Dreph Dsane at Danesmead Terrace. Work has also started on a mural in Crescent Road, opposite Nayland Rock, by artist Smug in partnership with British Divers Marine Life Rescue.

Find the information and the plan of the frescoes on http://riseupresidency.co.uk/

Find the details of the workshops on https://www.riseupcleanup.co.uk/residency

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Artist Nick Cave has translated a love for dance into his lively “sound suits”. Here are three things to know about this vibrant series https://songhaizeng.com/artist-nick-cave-has-translated-a-love-for-dance-into-his-lively-sound-suits-here-are-three-things-to-know-about-this-vibrant-series/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 15:31:30 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/artist-nick-cave-has-translated-a-love-for-dance-into-his-lively-sound-suits-here-are-three-things-to-know-about-this-vibrant-series/ At first glance, Chicago artist Nick Cave’s Soundsuits are colorful, even jubilant spectacles. Made from all sorts of materials – woven synthetic hair in kaleidoscopic hues of fluorescent green and hot pink, ceramic birds, sequins and bundles of twigs – these often-wearable costumes often resemble mythical creatures from storybooks or aliens. of Science fiction. But […]]]>

At first glance, Chicago artist Nick Cave’s Soundsuits are colorful, even jubilant spectacles. Made from all sorts of materials – woven synthetic hair in kaleidoscopic hues of fluorescent green and hot pink, ceramic birds, sequins and bundles of twigs – these often-wearable costumes often resemble mythical creatures from storybooks or aliens. of Science fiction. But despite their impressive appearance, these sculptures were initially born in response to complex social and political realities. Cave, which was bborn in 1959 in Fulton, Missouri, created his first “sound suit” in 1992 following the beating of Rodney King. “It’s amazing how something so profound can literally change your direction of thought and creation,” the artist said in an interview with the Boston Institute of Contemporary Art.

While walking through the park, the artist intuitively began collecting twigs and using them to construct an elaborate costume. When worn, the suit produced its own unique sounds and Soundsuits were born. Over the past 30 years, Cave has created over 500 Soundsuits, elaborate sculptures inspired by African tribal regalia and even medieval capes. The artist sees these works as a kind of protective armor, disguising the wearer’s race, age and gender; in the meantime, their sensory richness dazzles the public. Currently, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago hosts “Forothermore”, a survey exhibition of Cave’s artistic output, including many of his iconic Soundsuits.

On the occasion of the 30th anniversary of the creation of the first Soundsuit, we decided to take a closer look at this pivotal series and found three facts that can allow you to see them in a more complex way.

Cave’s interest in costumes began with self-expression

Production of the Art21 film “Extended Play”, “Nick Cave: Thick Skin”. © Art21, Inc. 2016.

Now director of the graduate fashion program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Cave discovered his talent for transformation early on. The youngest of seven boys raised by a single mother, Cave grew up wearing second-hand clothes. “You have to figure out how to make these clothes your own… That’s how I started, using things around the house,” Cave said in a 2009 interview. Cave’s mother encouraged his creative forays and her experiments with fabric, and the artist vividly remembers the imaginative power of the sock puppets she made for her. “The transition from being just a sock to being my best friend at that time was so huge and yet so simple for me as a kid. How do we get that innocence back? How do we get back to that dream place?” asked the artist.

The Soundsuits Recast Humble Materials in a Leading Role

Nick Cave, Soundsuit (2011).  © Nick Cave.  Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York Photo: James Prinz Photography

Nick Cave, sound combination (2011). © Nick Cave. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. Photo: James Prinz Photography.

Much like the first Soundsuit was constructed from twigs found in a park, Cave continues to travel the world around him to collect the objects that make up these sculptural mixed-media costumes. Although the Soundsuits may seem otherworldly, the sculptures are made up of everyday materials – plastic buttons, feathers, sequins – which create a tension between the familiar and the imaginary. The artist describes Soundsuits as his way of “challenging” a world that often devalues ​​individuals based on race, sexual orientation, class, or gender. Similarly, Cave subverts traditional definitions of fine art by creating objects at the crossroads of sculpture, fashion and performance.

“I discovered that what interested me was this whole idea of ​​scrap. I started collecting materials from flea markets and antique malls. And so, for me, it’s kind of me to take these objects and reintroduce them and give them a new kind of role,” Cave said in a conversation with the Museum of Modern Art. “A lot of the things you’ll find in a Soundsuit are things that we all recognize. You know, how do we look at things that get devalued, thrown away, and bring another kind of relevance to them.

They can also be activated by dancing

Heard Of Horses installation by Nick Cave at Vanderbilt Hall in Grand Central Terminal on March 30, 2013. Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images.

Nick Cave’s Heard of horses installation at Grand Central Terminal’s Vanderbilt Hall on March 30, 2013. Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images.

Before becoming a visual artist, Nick Cave was a trained dancer at the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. This passion for dance sustained the artist early in his career, spending hours in clubs, dancing alone and working on his thoughts.

Over the years, the artist has organized many performances with his Soundsuits. Although not all Soundsuits are meant to be worn, many have been designed with performers in mind. In 2013, the artist choreographed the in situ performance “Heard NYin collaboration with 60 dancers from the Alvin Ailey School at Grand Central Station in New York. These particular Soundsuits were made of colorful, crinkled raffia in shapes resembling life-size horses, with each suit being worn by two dancers. Together, the 30 horses – a herd – referenced the New York Metropolitan Transit Authority’s use of horses for transportation in the early 1900s. The performers would spontaneously dance through the famous transit hall.

More recently, Cave orchestrated Soundsuit shows with disadvantaged children. The sculptures, which can weigh up to 40 pounds, are meant to transport the wearer to a space of dream and revelation. Cave remembers trying out his first creation, saying: “I was inside a suit. You couldn’t tell if I was female or male; if I was black, red, green or orange; from Haiti or South Africa. I wasn’t Nick anymore, I was some kind of shaman.

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Pulse Healthcare System to Acquire Majority Stake in Houston Surgery Center https://songhaizeng.com/pulse-healthcare-system-to-acquire-majority-stake-in-houston-surgery-center/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 18:39:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/pulse-healthcare-system-to-acquire-majority-stake-in-houston-surgery-center/ HOUSTON, September 19, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Pulse Healthcare System (Pulse) today announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire a controlling interest in Crystal Outpatient Surgery Center (Crystal ASC). Crystal ASC is a state-of-the-art outpatient surgery center comprised of two operating theaters and two procedure rooms, conveniently located in West Houston. “We […]]]>

HOUSTON, September 19, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Pulse Healthcare System (Pulse) today announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire a controlling interest in Crystal Outpatient Surgery Center (Crystal ASC). Crystal ASC is a state-of-the-art outpatient surgery center comprised of two operating theaters and two procedure rooms, conveniently located in West Houston.

“We are extremely pleased to announce this transaction and partnership, which builds on Pulse’s track record of developing high-quality centers and clinics with leading physicians. Pulse currently has eight family medicine clinics in the Houston area that generates a huge need for access to ambulatory surgery centers and relationships with interventional pain doctors and orthopedists. This acquisition provides much needed capacity for our large number of patients requiring surgery,” said Gaurav Aggarwala MD., CEO of Pulse.

“Adding Crystal ASC to the Pulse Healthcare system allows us to provide state-of-the-art facilities to the many physicians across the Houston area looking for a surgery center. The center’s current case mix has a desirable distribution across multiple service lines, including interventional pain, spine, orthopedic and plastic surgery procedures,” said Smriti SinghChief Strategy Officer of Pulse.

“This acquisition by Pulse is a major step in creating a leading healthcare system comprised of hospitals, cath labs, and ambulatory surgery centers, all supported by primary care and care clinics. multi-specialty healthcare providers in major metropolitan markets,” said Harry FlemingDirector.

About the Pulse Healthcare System

Pulse Healthcare System is a diversified healthcare services company headquartered in Houston, TX. We operate eight family care clinics, two outpatient surgery centers, one of which is a Cardiovascular Center of Excellence, and other care sites and clinics. Across the Pulse Healthcare System, we seek to change the way multi-specialty medicine is delivered. We believe that a meaningful one-to-one relationship with our patients is at the heart of every successful outcome. Our staff is ready to welcome you into our family. Our mission is to follow your rhythm… one rhythm, in sync. For more information, please visit https://www.pulsehealthcaresystem.com/.

Contact:
Lauren Gilmore
[email protected]

SOURCE Pulse Healthcare System

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Evolution Music creates ‘ecologically sound’ 12-inch bioplastic vinyl https://songhaizeng.com/evolution-music-creates-ecologically-sound-12-inch-bioplastic-vinyl/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/evolution-music-creates-ecologically-sound-12-inch-bioplastic-vinyl/ Music and sustainability collective Evolution Music has crafted a 12-inch bioplastic vinyl using existing record pressing machines, which features tracks from artists Beatie Wolfe and Michael Stipe. Hailed as the world’s first commercially available 12-inch bioplastic vinyl by Evolution Music, the product is made from specially engineered bioplastic instead of traditional carbon-intensive PVC. 12 inch […]]]>

Music and sustainability collective Evolution Music has crafted a 12-inch bioplastic vinyl using existing record pressing machines, which features tracks from artists Beatie Wolfe and Michael Stipe.

Hailed as the world’s first commercially available 12-inch bioplastic vinyl by Evolution Music, the product is made from specially engineered bioplastic instead of traditional carbon-intensive PVC.

12 inch vinyl is made from bioplastic created by Evolution Music

The 12-inch bioplastic vinyl looks and performs like standard vinyl, consisting of a black disc illustrated with a central graphic pattern.

It was made using existing record pressing machines and production processes.

Record pressing machines
It is made using existing disc pressing machines

Its A-side features the track Future, If Future by American musician Stipe, while Oh My Heart by British-American artist Wolfe can be played on its B-side.

The creators of the 12-inch bioplastic vinyl said they were inspired to design the material and product themselves after struggling to find “sustainable solutions for physical media”.

“It’s a tough, environmentally safe compostable material created specifically to act and sound the same as PVC-derived vinyl,” Marc Carey, CEO of Evolution Music, told Dezeen.

vinyl sticker
Tracks by Michael Stipe and Beatie Wolfe feature on the disc

To create the bioplastic, a four-year development process involved identifying a base polymer that acts in the same way as traditional PVC, without producing harmful substances, according to Carey.

After that, the team sourced bio-organic fillers and co-created a solid additive used for plastics called bio-masterbatch.

Evolution Music’s goal was “to create an authentic, truly sustainable and eco-friendly biopolymer,” Carey explained.

“We’ve never developed a traditional plastic vinyl – I guess you should ask the PVC makers why they haven’t [create bioplastic vinyl],” he said.

Bioplastic vinyl
Evolution Music aimed to create a “sustainable” product

Five hundred copies of the 12-inch bioplastic vinyl were originally sold when it was released earlier this year, with proceeds going to the charity EarthPercent.

Founded by musician Brian Eno, EarthPercent invites artists to pledge to donate a portion of their earnings to the charity, which is then donated to organizations fighting climate change.

The release of the 12-inch bioplastic vinyl is part of a Bandcamp project by EarthPercent that includes more than 100 tracks from artists including Hot Chip, Peter Gabriel and Nile Rogers.

“It took three passionate, independent music lovers from the UK to develop this product out of necessity,” Carey concluded.

“The fact that the ‘big’ players didn’t do this in the first place raises some interesting questions about the oil, chemical, petroleum and plastics industry…just to say!”

Other recent bioplastic designs include an alternative to cling film made from waste potato peels and a polystyrene substitute created from plastic-eating mealworms.

Images courtesy of Evolution Music.

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DSM improves Indiana plant technology and sustainability https://songhaizeng.com/dsm-improves-indiana-plant-technology-and-sustainability/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 14:06:50 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/dsm-improves-indiana-plant-technology-and-sustainability/ DSM Engineering Materials has modernized and expanded its production site in Evansville, Ind. In a press release, officials said the investment includes significant upgrades focused on technology and sustainability. They added that these steps will help DSM meet the growing demand for next-generation high-performance polymers in a wide range of applications and contribute to the […]]]>

DSM Engineering Materials has modernized and expanded its production site in Evansville, Ind.

In a press release, officials said the investment includes significant upgrades focused on technology and sustainability. They added that these steps will help DSM meet the growing demand for next-generation high-performance polymers in a wide range of applications and contribute to the transition to a circular, low-carbon economy.

The 40,000 square foot factory now incorporates the latest production technologies and runs on 100% purchased renewable electricity.

The investment will help meet the long-term increase in regional demand for DSM materials, including Akulon-branded nylon 6 and 6/6, Arnite-branded PET/PBT, Arnitel-branded thermoplastic copolyester, nylon 4/10 brand EcoPaXX, brand ForTii nylon 4T/PPA and nylon 4/6 brand Stanyl.

Officials added that the expansion is driven by growing customer demand for materials used in vehicle electrification and supporting infrastructure, as well as lightweighting technologies across multiple industries.

Site improvements increase DSM’s ability to manufacture sustainable bio-based and/or recycled materials. These materials “were a key consideration” when planning the project, officials said. The company has made a global commitment to produce bio-based and recycled alternatives for its entire materials portfolio by 2030.

Variable-speed drives are used on all mixing lines at the site to reduce energy consumption, officials said. Facility checks result in further energy reductions.

“Our investment in the latest production equipment has reduced energy consumption in Evansville and reduced our environmental impact,” said Roeland Polet, president of Engineering Materials. “Through this project, we also aim to strengthen our business partnerships by continuing to invest in key areas of sustainable growth.”

He added that the expansion “reinforces our focus on North America as a key growth market for our business.”

Evansville site manager Dave Miller said investing in advanced technology “provides both short-term and long-term value.”

“This investment also underscores our commitment to sustainability and reducing our long-term environmental impact,” he added. “And by producing more organic and recycled materials, we can help more of our customers do the same.”

DSM Engineering Materials – including the Evansville site – is being sold to a newly formed joint venture between materials manufacturer Lanxess AG and global private equity firm Advent International. The deal, valued at nearly $4 billion, was announced in May.

DSM NV, based in Geleen, the Netherlands, is a global supplier of plastics and specialty chemicals. The company employs 23,000 people worldwide and has annual sales of nearly $11 billion.

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Chinese Performing Art Group uses the experience of immigration to inspire its dance | Local https://songhaizeng.com/chinese-performing-art-group-uses-the-experience-of-immigration-to-inspire-its-dance-local/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/chinese-performing-art-group-uses-the-experience-of-immigration-to-inspire-its-dance-local/ Dancers in red, yellow and blue skirts spin in the plastic-floored rehearsal room on a Saturday afternoon in July. Their instructor stands still in the corner while leading the dancers to rotate their positions in a circular motion. Chinese women rehearse the famous Chinese song “The Kite By Mistake” and do an accompanying dance during […]]]>

Dancers in red, yellow and blue skirts spin in the plastic-floored rehearsal room on a Saturday afternoon in July. Their instructor stands still in the corner while leading the dancers to rotate their positions in a circular motion.

Chinese women rehearse the famous Chinese song “The Kite By Mistake” and do an accompanying dance during a practice at 110 Orr St.

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Inside Tommy Hilfiger’s NYFW Fall/Winter 2022 Show: Plastic Ponchos, Umbrellas and Travis Barker https://songhaizeng.com/inside-tommy-hilfigers-nyfw-fall-winter-2022-show-plastic-ponchos-umbrellas-and-travis-barker/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 21:56:51 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/inside-tommy-hilfigers-nyfw-fall-winter-2022-show-plastic-ponchos-umbrellas-and-travis-barker/ The rain fell on Tommy Hilfiger‘s “Tommy Factory” Fall ’22 show on Sunday nights. But a soggy runway didn’t stop the designer’s big comeback at New York Fashion Week as attendees flocked to Brooklyn’s Skyline Drive-In and braved the wet conditions to celebrate Hilfiger. Inspired by Andy Warhol’s Factory, Hilfiger took over the Skyline Drive-In […]]]>

The rain fell on Tommy Hilfiger‘s “Tommy Factory” Fall ’22 show on Sunday nights. But a soggy runway didn’t stop the designer’s big comeback at New York Fashion Week as attendees flocked to Brooklyn’s Skyline Drive-In and braved the wet conditions to celebrate Hilfiger.

Inspired by Andy Warhol’s Factory, Hilfiger took over the Skyline Drive-In property with a massive concert-like set that resembled that of a modern pop art studio as the foil-clad track mirrored the bright red, blue and white lights in the rain fog.

And while stars and models managed to stay dry backstage and in repeat tents, fashion week’s most stylish attendees – who congregated outside the tent areas to watch the show in the stadium-like outdoor venue with bleachers — were forced to conceal their NYFW ensembles with plastic ponchos given to guests in an effort to protect them from the showers. Some fashion-savvy attendees refused the plastic covering – not yet ready to give up the street style – and tried to settle for umbrellas and jackets, but as the light rain turned into heavier rain, the umbrellas groped. sea ​​of ​​heads covered in plastic.

By ANDRES KUDACKI/AFP/Getty Images.

Once the kerfuffle of wet spectators made their way up the bleachers with umbrellas and ponchos galore, the show kicked off with a bang. Despite hundreds of ponchos and umbrellas blending into the backdrop of the shimmering Manhattan skyline, Hilfiger thrilled the audience as models walked the rainy runway to a tracklist featuring everything from remixes of Beyonceit is Renaissance at Azealia Banks and Diana Rossjuxtaposed with tape recordings of Warhol, which echoed throughout the booming beats.

Jalin Johnson opened the salon while models including Winnie Harlow, Ashley Graham, and Kate Mossthe daughter of Lilac marched down the runway with the “TH” logo. The veteran model and longtime face of Burberry was a proud mum as she watched Lila from the front row while huddled under a large plastic umbrella she shared with Kourtney Kardashian.

Hilfiger’s show also featured another runway appearance from Julia Foxwho made his NYFW debut by opening the The Quan Smith Fall 22 parade in February. Long duration vanity lounge contributor and former editor of Interview magazine Bob Colacello– known as Warhol’s right-hand man – also participated in the show wearing a Hilfiger varsity bomber jacket.

The star-studded front row also included Kardashian’s husband Travis Barker, Kris Jenner, Corey Gamble, Richard Quinn, Shawn Mendes, Jon Batiste, Halima Aden, John Legend, Anthony Ramos, and more.

By Lexie Moreland/WWD/Getty Images.

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Color Expert Annie Sloan Presents Two Days of Chalk Paint Demonstrations in New Orleans | Home & Garden https://songhaizeng.com/color-expert-annie-sloan-presents-two-days-of-chalk-paint-demonstrations-in-new-orleans-home-garden/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 17:30:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/color-expert-annie-sloan-presents-two-days-of-chalk-paint-demonstrations-in-new-orleans-home-garden/ It’s paint that helped fuel the shabby chic trend, which started in the 90s and is making a comeback right now. Designer Annie Sloan is coming to New Orleans September 18-19 with two days of chalk painting demonstrations on how to create your own decorative artwork. Considered one of the world’s foremost authorities on painting, […]]]>

It’s paint that helped fuel the shabby chic trend, which started in the 90s and is making a comeback right now. Designer Annie Sloan is coming to New Orleans September 18-19 with two days of chalk painting demonstrations on how to create your own decorative artwork.

Considered one of the world’s foremost authorities on painting, color and style, Sloan studied fine art and then turned to decorative painting. This led her to invent her own specialist product, which makes it easier to paint furniture because little or no surface prep work is required.

At his first-ever Chalk Paint Festival, to be held at the New Orleans Culinary & Hospitality Institute, attendees will have the chance to meet Sloan’s artists-in-residence and see each demonstrate a distinct technique on stage. But the real star of the show is Sloan herself, who will also be teaching at the event.






Annie Sloan creates a malachite effect on a table.




Sloan turned to decorative work in the 1970s, painting murals in houses to order. When she couldn’t find the type of high quality paint she wanted to work with, she decided to make it herself. Using his knowledge of color, paint, pigments and art history, Sloan developed what would become Specialty Chalk Paint, a special type of decorative paint designed to work with little or no preparation. of surface.

Today, the 27-book author sells his products exclusively through a network of more than 1,500 independent resellers in more than 40 countries around the world. Sloan and her husband run the business from Oxford, England, where we recently caught up with her via Zoom.







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A shaded wardrobe in Barcelona Orange and Capri Pink.




Whow did you choose New Orleans to host the very first Chalk Paint Festival?

The first distributor of my painting in America was based in New Orleans. She’s no longer the vending machine, but we loved the city. New Orleans is just an amazing place. In some ways, it’s the most European city in America. But more than that, it’s colorful and it’s alive. So, it’s just a lot of fun.

What inspired you to create this event and what do you have planned?

I really want to show people the variety of styles and techniques possible with Chalk Paint, and some of the amazing things people do. We see painters from all over the world painting in their own way. And so we’re bringing in nine painters from all over America and England, each with their own style or their own approach.

And it’s quite varied: from a watercolor look to a textured impasto. A painter makes beautiful modern flowers; others will demonstrate marbling and wood graining techniques. Some of their pieces are really wild and crazy, and some of them are very quiet and quiet.







botanical theme

A small chest of drawers receives a botanical treatment.




Do you see trends that inspire you?

I’ve noticed that people don’t just paint, they add patterns to it. I love seeing the cool things people can do with hand painting. Maybe it’s a freehand tape. I’m really, really impressed that people are learning to just say, “Oh, I made a blob or a line, so let’s see what I can do with it.” Because when I started it, people were very nervous. They wanted to know the rules and stick to them.

What makes Chalk Paint so popular today?

Many people say what they like the most (when using it) is feeling very peaceful while painting. … It’s almost therapeutic. After what we’ve all been through in the past year, that’s what a lot of people want. And with times a little tougher now, people are finding Chalk Paint to be a budget-friendly way to update a piece of furniture they already have. You don’t need to go out and buy something new.

What would you say to the person who can’t believe it’s possible to paint furniture without sanding or prepping?

Well, you have to think back to how they painted furniture back then. Two hundred years ago they weren’t initiating, planning and doing all this work. And this painting lasted a very, very long time. So I started thinking: why did this happen? What did they do to make the paint last? That’s how I started, and eventually I found a formula that worked. I can’t reveal the exact formula, of course. But Chalk Paint adheres to all surfaces: porcelain, glass, plastic, marble. You can even paint fabric with it.

And do you offer a special discount for locals to attend the New Orleans event?

We are delighted to have people from England, Canada and all over the United States. But we really want people from New Orleans to come to the event, so we’re offering a $200 discount to locals. Simply enter the code LOCAL at checkout.

To learn more or purchase tickets for Annie’s Big Paint Weekend, visit anniesloan.com/us/annie-sloans-big-paint-weekend.

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