Plastic Art – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 10:07:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://songhaizeng.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-138x136.png Plastic Art – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ 32 32 Everything you need to know about Sea Hear Now in Asbury Park https://songhaizeng.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-sea-hear-now-in-asbury-park/ https://songhaizeng.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-sea-hear-now-in-asbury-park/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 09:06:20 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-sea-hear-now-in-asbury-park/ The wait is over. The massive Sea Hear Now music, art and surf festival returns to North Beach and Bradley Park in Asbury Park on Saturday September 18 and Sunday September 19. The 2020 festival has been canceled due to the coronavirus outbreak. Pearl Jam and the Avett Brothers, which were due to make headlines […]]]>

The wait is over.

The massive Sea Hear Now music, art and surf festival returns to North Beach and Bradley Park in Asbury Park on Saturday September 18 and Sunday September 19. The 2020 festival has been canceled due to the coronavirus outbreak. Pearl Jam and the Avett Brothers, which were due to make headlines in 2020, return to headlining Saturday, and the Smashing Pumpkins will close on Sunday.

There are two other members of the Rock and Roll Hall of Famers on the bill: Patti Smith and her Band, and Mike Campbell, who joins the Dirty Knobs. Campbell starred in Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

Local talent is represented by Remember Jones, Jackson Pines and American Trappist. The festival also features professional and local surfers, as well as artwork by musicians from the Transparent Gallery pop-up in Bradley Park.

The Sea Hear Now Festival 2019 at Asbury Park.

Over 35,000 people attended the second Sea Hear Now in 2019 to see bands like the Dave Matthews Band, Lumineers, Bad Religion, Struts, Joan Jett, B-52, Dispatch, Dropkick Murphys, Black Pumas and more.

Expect around 35,000 this year, but there will be more beach room as the two stages are about a block apart from each other.


Source link

]]>
https://songhaizeng.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-sea-hear-now-in-asbury-park/feed/ 0
San Francisco is the best city in the world right now – here’s why https://songhaizeng.com/san-francisco-is-the-best-city-in-the-world-right-now-heres-why/ https://songhaizeng.com/san-francisco-is-the-best-city-in-the-world-right-now-heres-why/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/san-francisco-is-the-best-city-in-the-world-right-now-heres-why/ San Francisco has long been a beacon of progressive ideas, inclusion and innovation. These values ​​- not to mention the Michelin-starred restaurants, endless hiking possibilities, and fashionable dispensaries – are all reasons why people polled in the 2021 Time Out Index named it “the best city in the world” in 2021. Of course, City by […]]]>

San Francisco has long been a beacon of progressive ideas, inclusion and innovation. These values ​​- not to mention the Michelin-starred restaurants, endless hiking possibilities, and fashionable dispensariesare all reasons why people polled in the 2021 Time Out Index named it “the best city in the world” in 2021.

Of course, City by the Bay has its fair share of issues (homelessness, unaffordable housing, and increasingly poor air quality during fire season tend to grab the headlines) – but which city does not have ? What sets San Francisco apart is the way it has responded, especially to the unprecedented events of the past year.

In 2020, leaders implemented one of the most aggressive (and effective) Covid-19 responses in the country, and residents came together to keep the city’s spirit and culture alive. Residents have pedestrianized the streets to create more space for outdoor gatherings, built beautiful parklets for alfresco dining and soaking, painted barricaded storefronts with murals, and even shared common sourdoughs for fueling the pastry craze.

San Francisco is, in many ways, the perfect place to weather the pandemic with year-round balmy weather, a thriving restaurant and take-out scene, high-quality cannabis, and endless, accessible adventures in the world. nature – from hikes in wine country to days spent lounging on the beach. Now, with the city benefiting from high vaccination rates (and rules prohibiting the unvaccinated from many indoor spaces), it is one of the safest places to enjoy the kind of city life we ​​all lacked.


Source link

]]>
https://songhaizeng.com/san-francisco-is-the-best-city-in-the-world-right-now-heres-why/feed/ 0
The lady’s thumb is not a lady | Chroniclers https://songhaizeng.com/the-ladys-thumb-is-not-a-lady-chroniclers/ https://songhaizeng.com/the-ladys-thumb-is-not-a-lady-chroniclers/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/the-ladys-thumb-is-not-a-lady-chroniclers/ Effective and efficient weed control is an art. To be effective, it is important to know their habits and their life cycles. After all, they are smarter than us because they have had centuries to adapt to our environment. An excellent example is the “smartweed” (Persicana marculosa). It goes by several names, but especially Lady’s […]]]>

Effective and efficient weed control is an art.

To be effective, it is important to know their habits and their life cycles. After all, they are smarter than us because they have had centuries to adapt to our environment.

An excellent example is the “smartweed” (Persicana marculosa). It goes by several names, but especially Lady’s Thumb for the purple spot on the leaves that looks like a thumbprint. Delicate pink blossoms appear on stems 3 to 3 feet long that look like they should be in a lady’s bouquet.

It is not all bad. With the exception of its roots, all parts of the plant are edible, rich in nutrients, and some have likened the flavor of the leaves to that of spinach. It is edible from spring to fall frosts, but is best in mid-spring as it becomes bitter with age. Warning: it contains toxins including tannins that cause photosensitivity in some people. It has long been used for many home remedies, including reducing irritation from poison ivy. This is where its charming assets end.

Like all invasive plants, this Eurasian plant has adapted to all soils, humidity conditions, sun to partial shade and grows easily in zones 5-10.

Lady’s Thumb is in bloom now before it gives seed. Control by pulling or chemically. The stems of the ground cover are stiff but thin and will easily pull away from the plant. To pull successfully, grab the base and give it a slight twist while pulling gently. If the soil is clayey, water the soil the day before to soften the soil making it easier to dig or send and upright weed control. This makes it easier to obtain taproots. If all is not ripped or pulled out, it will come back in the spring, but at least you need to reduce its spread by stopping going to seed. Chemical control includes a non-selective herbicide or a systemic herbicide. The best chemical controls contain dicamba, 2,4-D, or glyphosate.

THINGS TO DO

“Life is short, plant more flowers.” Break the Dutch bulbs. Planting of the fall bulbs begins in late September and continues until the ground is frozen.

Garden – Plant hellebores and arum for winter interest. Plant perennials on an overcast day or in the late afternoon. Water well. Remove old annual flower stems and fertilize one last boost before winter. Hollyhocks (hibiscus family) can be annual, biennial or perennial. Remove the stems, the seeds have formed and ripened. Drop a few to the ground to self-seed. Keep hydrangeas moist. Do not divide baptisia, bleeding heart, monastery, peonies and poppies. Gently pull or cut the stems and foliage of the daylily to 6-8 “or wait until all the foliage is dead, pull and compost the foliage.

Company garlic, a member of the allium family, sows easily, germinates and quickly takes hold of the garden.

Cut the stems before the flowers produce seeds.

Shoot or dig the young poison ivy. Place a plastic bag over the plant and pull holding the bagged plant at the source, and as you pull let the bag cover the plant, making sure the whole plant is in the plastic bag, attach the handles and put it in the trash.

Houseplants – Order amaryllis and white ‘Ziva’ paper daffodils to force the holidays. Fertilize the spider plant once or twice a month. To start new plants, pin the “little ones” (seedlings) to potting soil, separate them from the mother plant when it is rooted. The new plants have started in the water but will not grow as tall.

Vegetables – To prevent grasshoppers from eating their favorite foods, sprinkle with flour or diatomaceous earth. Foods include beans, carrots, corn, lettuce, raspberries, and flowers. Or, spray with chili or a mixture of garlic and water.

Labor Day Weekend September 4-6 – 44th Annual Japanese Festival – Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Blvd., St. Louis, Saturday and Sunday 9 am to 8 pm, Monday 9 am to 5 pm. For tickets: events.missouribotanicalgarden.org or 314-577-5100


Source link

]]>
https://songhaizeng.com/the-ladys-thumb-is-not-a-lady-chroniclers/feed/ 0
David Ellis on Sessions Arts Club: Fairytale room the place to be see https://songhaizeng.com/david-ellis-on-sessions-arts-club-fairytale-room-the-place-to-be-see/ https://songhaizeng.com/david-ellis-on-sessions-arts-club-fairytale-room-the-place-to-be-see/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 10:08:12 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/david-ellis-on-sessions-arts-club-fairytale-room-the-place-to-be-see/ T The best restaurants feel conspiratorial; they are in the game. They are both hosts and witnesses, watching funny lunches and unfolding love stories – but also capturing confessions, listening to confidences, noticing furtive glances. You can’t conceive of a feeling, but you can experience them: it’s up there at the French House, down at […]]]>
T

The best restaurants feel conspiratorial; they are in the game. They are both hosts and witnesses, watching funny lunches and unfolding love stories – but also capturing confessions, listening to confidences, noticing furtive glances. You can’t conceive of a feeling, but you can experience them: it’s up there at the French House, down at Andrew Edmunds and now – take the elevator to the fourth floor – here at the Sessions Arts Club.

Sessions – arty, yes; a club, no – has that feeling of being a secret to be cherished. I mean, too much of a secret for her own good at first: it took three passes to spot her little red door left ajar. But it could be just me; Sadly, I suspect I wouldn’t have thought the wardrobe was the way to Narnia.

As it turns out, this dining room is all fancy: it’s a fairy tale of faded Regency-era glamor, worn green paint and crumbling pink plaster, ceilings tall as giants , large arched windows breathing in light. Modern and attractive art is dotted around, although I could have done without the two pairs of plastic mannequin legs hanging from the ceiling, which made me wonder if anyone had trashed the local BHS during taking office. But the room is its own gallery; even the tablecloths are covered with white sheets of cartridge paper, the gentle idle spirits scribble. I rarely nostalgia for a ’90s Beefeater, but I wanted the waiters to come with a pot of pencils, like they did when I was little.

Despite being run by St John co-founder and semi-professional costume collector Jon Spiteri, a delight, the main title is Florence Knight, back in a London kitchen after about six years away – the family had waved in the meantime. It is a joy to find her again. Knight’s irritating, unstructured menu – management is handy at times – is sort of Italian, sort of French, definitely seasonal, and mostly simple stuff at prices that in some cases seem comically high, as if to confirm to foreigners that yes, London sometimes takes its share for a turn (a single crab cakes, yours for a five). The wine list, put together by the guys at Noble Rot, Dan Keeling and Mark Andrew, is terrific, but tyrannically it doesn’t start until the mid-1930s. And yet, and yet … well, we came away stuffed and gloriously happy. Money is for spending. I’m not going to chat: you know your own budget.

Deliciously fresh from the sea: mackerel with datterini tomatoes

/ Adrien Lourie

As they were, these croquettes were lovely little spheres, crisp and powerfully grumpy, while a mackerel arrived deliciously fresh from the sea and lightly salted, the flesh sweet under a covering of datterini tomatoes and the spiciness of capers. There were mellow sweetbreads among a marsh greedy for lovage and lettuce; one to remember as September coldly sparkles. The fig leaf and sorrel sea bream was bright and crisp, a Kooning palette of greens and whites. We all smiled at them.

With space, it’s a room to see and see, and our lunch was loud with gossip. In the evening, you can walk there for a drink; if the piano turns on, i’m struggling to find a better place to do it. But whatever you do, grab some pudding. A slice of sweet melon was carved to make a cheerfully stuffed lemon sorbet wedge a dreamy summer finisher.

Dream summer finale: melon with lemon sorbet

/ Adrien Lourie

Chocolate pie tends not to be the delightful sort of thing, but here it was enough to cause a sneaky argument: a couple below us ostensibly shared, but the dude kept taking more and more forks. bigger. Cheeky asshole, I thought, but my mom wasn’t inclined to try me on either.

If you book on the back of this review – and despite the grunts I’m about to go back, I really enjoyed it – don’t talk about the puds on your date, keep them to yourself . Ask the restaurant to keep the schtum. This is your secret; they’re on the rest of them.

24 Clerkenwell Green, Old Sessions House, EC1R 0NA. Meal for two plus drinks, service included, approximately £ 150. Open Wednesday to Friday from 12 p.m. to 2.30 p.m. and from 5.30 p.m. to 10 p.m. sessionsartsclub.com


Source link

]]>
https://songhaizeng.com/david-ellis-on-sessions-arts-club-fairytale-room-the-place-to-be-see/feed/ 0
‘A lot of good came out of it’ | Local News https://songhaizeng.com/a-lot-of-good-came-out-of-it-local-news/ https://songhaizeng.com/a-lot-of-good-came-out-of-it-local-news/#respond Sat, 28 Aug 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/a-lot-of-good-came-out-of-it-local-news/ WATERBURY – On Friday, August 26, 2011, children at Hunger Mountain Children’s Center on South Main Street helped their teachers revamp and decorate their classrooms to prepare for the transition from summer mode to preschool the following week. When they left for the weekend, they had no idea that they would never come back to […]]]>

WATERBURY – On Friday, August 26, 2011, children at Hunger Mountain Children’s Center on South Main Street helped their teachers revamp and decorate their classrooms to prepare for the transition from summer mode to preschool the following week.

When they left for the weekend, they had no idea that they would never come back to play, learn and take a nap in the comfortable two-story house that some had frequented since their childhood. In fact, these preschoolers would be in college in 2017 when the kids finally returned to South Main Street Daycare and Kindergarten, more than five years after Tropical Storm Irene recovered.

Waterbury was among the communities in central Vermont that were hit hard by Irene. The Winooski River flowed through the vast state office complex, neighboring neighborhoods and businesses up and down Main Street and the Highway 2 corridor stretching from Moretown to Bolton.

As the dirt roads, culverts and bridges in the nearby town of Duxbury were washed away, the houses in Waterbury town center had basements filled with river water and mud, many upper floors flooded to ‘to their kitchen worktops.

Those on the way to the water were evacuated and took refuge with friends and family on higher ground; others inside the nearby Thatcher Brook Elementary School were spared by the flood waters.

Many outside the village did not know until the next morning what destruction had really hit their neighbors.

The Winooski Street Bridge that connects Waterbury and Duxbury told the tale that took place overnight as entire trees, branches and an assortment of debris were lodged in the decking of the steel structure that sits two floors above the Winooski river on a normal day.

Daily routines came to a halt as apparently all able-bodied residents mobilized, following instructions from city officials, and deployed to the homes of people they had never even met to begin the cleaning job. .

“I was truly amazed at the amount of help we all received from people we didn’t just know in Waterbury, but across the state. It was truly heartwarming and made you feel like you weren’t alone, ”remembers longtime Waterbury resident Howard P.“ Skip ”Flanders. A resident of Elm Street, the Flanders home he shares with his wife Cathy, was damaged by Irene, as was the Wesleyan United Methodist Church on Main Street where he is an active leader of the congregation. In addition to these impacts, Flanders was one of three village administrators at the time of the storm, adding elected office in the aftermath of such a disaster.

“It shocked me in a way, but not. People you would see at certain board meetings discussing different sides of an issue – it didn’t matter which side you were on then. Everyone was just participating and helping each other, ”recalls MK Monley, whose day job at the time was an art teacher at Thatcher Brook Elementary School. One of her volunteer roles was as chair of the nonprofit economic development group Revitalizing Waterbury. RW, as it’s known, stepped in to form a short-term project called ReBuild Waterbury which raised over $ 1 million and hired a case manager, construction manager and volunteer coordinator. His job was to help homeowners get their homes back and bridge the financial gap between insurance and disaster relief payments.

Monley remembers how his place of work – the elementary school – was first a shelter, then the response center, then municipal offices until November 2011. After the Federal Emergency Management Administration responders had left Waterbury, city staff moved upstairs to the town center fire station which had only been built and opened weeks before Irene. City staff worked there until 2016, when the new city offices were completed.

Flanders remembers how the Saint-Léo room in the Catholic Church down the street became a gathering place in the days and weeks following the storm. “The community meals offered by the Red Cross in St. Leo’s have been very helpful for many reasons and a source of mental support,” he said.

Ten years later, memories resurface as the residents of Waterbury today examine their community not only intact, but with many significant improvements that have occurred in the decade since Irene.

The historic Henry Janes House, on the outskirts of town on North Main Street, overlooks the park and ball fields that were once the family farm of the Civil War surgeon and local benefactor. But today, the 19th-century Doctor’s House is a local museum to which is attached a new complex of municipal offices and a public library, the result of post-disaster construction.

The city’s old office building on Main Street was destroyed by flood waters. The $ 5 million reconstruction project produced a modern facility with a community meeting room and a brand new library, a project the community had on their to-do list for years but failed to tackle before Irene’s recovery.

City Manager Bill Shepeluk looks back now and says he appreciates the drive to rebuild better than what was in place before Irene. The library is a good example. “Maybe we could have upgraded (the library) eventually but the original building was not adequate,” he said.

The state took a similar approach, closing the state mental hospital to build a modern facility in Berlin. It demolished around 20 buildings in its Waterbury town center complex and built a $ 125 million 21st century office building after extensive earthworks along the Winooski in anticipation of future flooding. Changes to the state complex opened the door for new affordable housing through Downstreet Housing and the Hunger Mountain Children’s Center eventually returned after purchasing its old building which it leased to the state and the one next door, rebuilding them into a larger and modern daycare and preschool that the association now has.

Over 200 homes have been renovated with help from ReBuild Waterbury in Irene’s wake, many with features to prepare for possible future flooding. Some were raised several feet to sit higher on their lots; many had electrical panels and other key systems relocated to upper floors. Likewise, local authorities have taken steps to better prepare for future emergencies, such as adding generators to the primary school and new offices in the city, Shepeluk said.

“People ask me if I could go back in time, would I do it again,” he said. “I wouldn’t want to go through Irene anymore. Physically and emotionally, it impacted me and many of us. But a lot of good has come out of it. “

Flanders accepted. “We have all gone through many stages to rebuild our homes and buildings, but we have made improvements that would not have happened otherwise. That’s true at home and at the Methodist church. These improvements will benefit properties and occupants in the future, but I hope we don’t have to start over, ”he said.

Monley echoed those sentiments and also reflected on how the experience built more than just brick and mortar improvements. “New friendships have been formed,” she said, noting how she and her husband, Don Schneider, who was the primary school principal at the time, welcomed a displaced family. That bond still remains strong, she said. “I think we’ve learned that we can rely on each other when the going is tough. “

Flanders said that an experience like Irene transforms more than the physical environment. It left an indelible mark, he said, that affects perspective and instills empathy. “Every time I see a flood on TV I know the long, difficult road these people have to travel once the water drops and the reporting fades,” Flanders said. “Then the real help is needed and the hard work begins. “

On a parallel track, during flood recovery and reconstruction at a myriad of construction sites around Waterbury town center, state and local governments have pursued several road and transport infrastructure projects. If it feels like there has been road construction for much of the last decade in Waterbury, that’s because it is.

Shepeluck checked the list: construction of the roundabout at the junction of routes 2 and 100; replacement of Interstate 89 bridges; reconstruction of routes 2 and 100 between Waterbury and Bolton in the west and Stowe in the north; the recent reconstruction of Main Street which included the replacement of the water and sewer systems.

“It’s an incredible amount of work that has happened in a decade,” he said.

Three years of work on the Main Street project have just ended, and a ribbon cutting Friday was to mark this milestone with Irene’s birthday. Part of this commemoration will revisit a 2012 project carried out just one year after the storm.

As an artist and art educator, Monley typically turns to art in everything she does. Recovery from the floods was no different. “The Floodgates Art Project was one of the most powerful exhibitions I have ever been to,” she said. From a simple idea of ​​distributing 6 inch by 6 inch plastic tiles to community members was born this display of hundreds of personal and detailed works of art using every medium imaginable as people of all ages shared their thoughts and reactions to the disaster.

“This art project allowed people to process their experiences,” said Monley. “I myself must have done a dozen different articles all expressing different aspects of what I had dealt with – from teaching full time to starting ReBuild Waterbury and attending nightly meetings at least four. per week at the start; then have a family that lives with us for seven months. It was a lot.

The pieces were displayed in the Elm Street space now occupied by the Craft Beer Cellar store in 2012 to mark Irene’s first birthday. Recently, dozens of pieces were unpacked from Monley’s barn and set up in Axel’s Frame Shop and Gallery on Stowe Street, where they will be on display until September 25.

It is also where a two-story metal-mounted mural on the building’s exterior wall, “Phoenix Rising”, has taken up residence. The image created by artist Jessi Zawicki has been inspired by the resilience and transformation of the community over the past decade.

Schneider, now a retired elementary school principal, said the resilience and transformation is real.

“Our city now has a quiet confidence that we can lick anything,” he said.


Source link

]]>
https://songhaizeng.com/a-lot-of-good-came-out-of-it-local-news/feed/ 0
New skateboard contains some of Tony Hawk’s real blood https://songhaizeng.com/new-skateboard-contains-some-of-tony-hawks-real-blood/ https://songhaizeng.com/new-skateboard-contains-some-of-tony-hawks-real-blood/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 14:41:14 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/new-skateboard-contains-some-of-tony-hawks-real-blood/ A limited edition skateboard decked out in red paint that features some of Tony Hawk’s actual blood is now available as part of a collaboration between the legendary skateboarder and water brand Liquid Death Mountain Water. Liquid Death is the canned water company that uses punk rock style in its business goal of wiping out […]]]>

A limited edition skateboard decked out in red paint that features some of Tony Hawk’s actual blood is now available as part of a collaboration between the legendary skateboarder and water brand Liquid Death Mountain Water.

Liquid Death is the canned water company that uses punk rock style in its business goal of wiping out waste from plastic water bottles. Hawk, of course, is the 53-year-old retired athlete and entrepreneur who has no problem lending viral credibility to a fellow artist or helping a young skateboarder get a new deck.

But Hawk’s latest move is a little weirder. As reported Tuesday, August 24 by Rolling Stone, his Liquid Death skateboard limited to $ 100 and $ 500 is painted in a shade “created by taking a vial of real Hawk blood and mixing it with red paint.”

A representative for the brand said the process “ensures that there is a piece of Tony’s DNA in every board.”

See what that looks like towards the bottom of this post.

Hey, we know Hawk loves his fans, but does he really want to be so intimate with them that they own a piece of his blood?

“I am deeply grateful to have a connection with my fans, and I appreciate the way Liquid Death connects with theirs,” the skater said in a press release. “This collaboration takes those connections to a new level, because I literally put my blood (and my soul?) Into these decks.”

Hawk added, “And I’m proud to know that organizations fighting plastic pollution and creating skate parks around the world will be supported through our efforts.”

Find out how to buy the board – which features artwork combining Liquid Death’s tallboy character “Thirst Executioner” with nods to Hawk’s classic Birdhouse days – at liquiddeath.com. The company says part of the proceeds from the collaboration will go to the non-profit 5 Gyres anti-plastic association as well as Tony Hawk’s The Skatepark project.

11 music venues that would be haunted


Source link

]]>
https://songhaizeng.com/new-skateboard-contains-some-of-tony-hawks-real-blood/feed/ 0
Walt Disney’s personal plane remains abandoned at Disney World https://songhaizeng.com/walt-disneys-personal-plane-remains-abandoned-at-disney-world/ https://songhaizeng.com/walt-disneys-personal-plane-remains-abandoned-at-disney-world/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 21:19:56 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/walt-disneys-personal-plane-remains-abandoned-at-disney-world/ With the majority of Walt Disney World still looking magical, it’s hard to imagine that there are sections that can feel a bit abandoned. Credit: Disney With Disney World being the size of San Francisco, there’s plenty of room to put things that might not be in use. In the past, we have spoken of […]]]>

With the majority of Walt Disney World still looking magical, it’s hard to imagine that there are sections that can feel a bit abandoned.

Credit: Disney

With Disney World being the size of San Francisco, there’s plenty of room to put things that might not be in use. In the past, we have spoken of the now abandoned airport which was active on the property for a few years. There was also an entire water park, River Country, which was empty for many years, and prior to the construction of Disney’s Art of Animation, the space housed what many guests called a “ghost hotel” as it had been. abandoned during construction.

Country of the river
Credit: Coreyjune12

Now, it appears that Walt Disney’s personal plane, the Grumman G-159 Gulfstream 1, which Walt used to fly between Burbank and Orlando, also appears to be rather left unattended. Walt’s plane is currently in a service area north of Disney’s Animal Kingdom.

In a recent snapshot by photographer Bioreconstruct (@bioreconstruct), we can see that the plane’s hood is starting to come off, which could be causing water to accumulate in the plane’s housing.

Aerial view of Walt’s plane in a Walt Disney World service area. Looks like part of the tail is exposed, and rain could collect inside if the plastic is sealed tightly underneath.

@WDWGuestService Could you forward this report to the appropriate maintenance to verify conditions?

Hopefully, the exposed area of ​​the coating did not cause any damage to the exterior of the aircraft. Personally, I would love to see this plane being used in one of the Disney World parks, given the historical significance it holds. It almost seems wrong not to have the plane in an area that guests can watch!

Theme Park Architect (@ParkArchitect) responded to the Tweet with an interesting update on why the plane was moved and why it hasn’t moved since.

It got repainted when we started the DHS expansion and at one point there were plans to move to Glendale but no one wanted to fund the shipping costs. Disney offered it to the Florida Air Museums, but no takers. The interior is emptied. That’s where he landed (pun intended).

For now, it looks like the plane will stay at its current location for the foreseeable future.

Where would you like to see Walt’s plane in Disney World?



Source link

]]>
https://songhaizeng.com/walt-disneys-personal-plane-remains-abandoned-at-disney-world/feed/ 0
Dive after a sauna on the farm https://songhaizeng.com/dive-after-a-sauna-on-the-farm/ https://songhaizeng.com/dive-after-a-sauna-on-the-farm/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 07:45:29 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/dive-after-a-sauna-on-the-farm/ In February 2018, Anne Catherine Bredin thought she had had an excellent first date with John Francis Greey Brandon. After matching the 98th percentile on OkCupid, the couple met at de Mole, a Mexican restaurant near Ms Bredin’s apartment in Sunnyside, Queens (Mr Brandon lived in Greenpoint, Brooklyn). Later, as they walked over to the […]]]>

In February 2018, Anne Catherine Bredin thought she had had an excellent first date with John Francis Greey Brandon. After matching the 98th percentile on OkCupid, the couple met at de Mole, a Mexican restaurant near Ms Bredin’s apartment in Sunnyside, Queens (Mr Brandon lived in Greenpoint, Brooklyn). Later, as they walked over to the nearby Maggie Mae bar, they shared a kiss.

At 6ft 6in, Mr. Brandon “was very attractive, personable and talkative,” recalls Ms. Bredin, now 34.

They exchanged texts afterwards. But when Mrs. Bredin asked to meet again, she never got an answer. As it turned out, Mr. Brandon’s enthusiastic response was unsuccessful. The two were surprised by the radio silence, but attributed it to a meeting in New York.

In the months that followed, Ms Bredin, who grew up in Belfast, Northern Ireland, embarked on her first semester at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, where she recently obtained her law degree. Previously, she was logistics manager for the Perrotin contemporary art gallery in Manhattan.

“Maybe I should try going out again,” she recalls thinking after finishing her first semester in September.

When she returned to OkCupid, Mr. Brandon was the first match to appear. Ms. Bredin decided to reach out. After realizing the previous technical problem, they had their second date long delayed.

“” She brings out the best in me. “

Mr. Brandon, 35, named JF, is the vice president of marketing and business development at BotFactory, a manufacturer of 3D circuit printers. He obtained a degree in economics from Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada, in 2012; in the same year, he was the curator of the Rygo, the largest 3D-printed sculptural work of art at the time in North America (now in his parents’ yard in Ottawa, Canada, where he grew up ).

In March 2020, Mr. Brandon began moving his belongings to Ms. Bredin’s apartment. Then the coronavirus hit, and they decided to wait a few weeks at her family’s farm in New Ipswich, NH, which originally housed her maternal great-grandparents from Finland. They ended up staying for 10 months.

“I spent my summers growing up there and it was nice to introduce JF to things that are familiar to me,” Ms. Bredin said.

After recovering from a case of Covid a week upon arrival, they immersed themselves in the country. They planted corn and squash; he built a fence for their two cats and a large catapult for fun. At Mr Brandon’s insistence, they also took care of wild kittens living under their neighbor’s barn.

Still, they were ready to put 2020 behind them by New Years Eve. Around 10pm that night, they had a wood-fired sauna.

“Why did you get dressed? Ms. Bredin asked when Mr. Brandon later appeared in his shirt and jeans. She was in her pajamas on the sofa, ready to play a board game.

She walked over to him in the reading corner and got his answer. He fell to one knee. In his hand was a 3D printed white acrylate plastic ring, a prototype he designed and had printed at Shapeways, a company in Long Island City, Queens.

“It was sculptural like a lazy stream with stones,” Mr. Brandon said. In the end, they decided to turn the prototype, with a few redesigns, into their gold wedding rings, and traded in a more traditional engagement ring that they found online.

They chose to get married at the Temple Congregational Church in Temple, NH. Since the pandemic imposed travel restrictions from Canada and Northern Ireland, they have moved their date from May 2021 to August 7.

Pastor Ken Whitson, a minister of the Congregation, officiated in front of 30 vaccinated guests; a toast and dinner followed at the nearby Birchwood Inn. For the after party, they celebrated outside the farm with fireworks and a red velvet cake made by their neighbor with an alpaca farm.


Source link

]]>
https://songhaizeng.com/dive-after-a-sauna-on-the-farm/feed/ 0
Egypt papyrus makers keep tradition alive despite tourism slump – Art & Culture https://songhaizeng.com/egypt-papyrus-makers-keep-tradition-alive-despite-tourism-slump-art-culture/ https://songhaizeng.com/egypt-papyrus-makers-keep-tradition-alive-despite-tourism-slump-art-culture/#respond Mon, 09 Aug 2021 07:30:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/egypt-papyrus-makers-keep-tradition-alive-despite-tourism-slump-art-culture/ In the lush green fields of Egypt’s fertile Delta Valley, farmers and artisans are struggling to make a living as they keep alive the Pharaonic-era tradition of making papyrus. In the 1970s, an art teacher in the village of Al-Qaramus taught farmers the millennia-old techniques for transforming the plant into sought-after paper decorated with ornate […]]]>

In the lush green fields of Egypt’s fertile Delta Valley, farmers and artisans are struggling to make a living as they keep alive the Pharaonic-era tradition of making papyrus.

In the 1970s, an art teacher in the village of Al-Qaramus taught farmers the millennia-old techniques for transforming the plant into sought-after paper decorated with ornate drawings and text.

The village and its surrounds, located about 80 kilometers (50 miles) northeast of Cairo, now make up the largest hub of papyrus production in the country, experts in the sector say.

Once used by ancient Egyptians as writing paper, local artists now decorate the papyrus with hieroglyphics, Arabic calligraphy and representations from antiquity and nature to create souvenirs for eager visitors.

But tourism in the North African country has taken a battering since its 2011 revolution, and after a Russian airliner was downed by the Islamic State group in 2015.

The Covid-19 pandemic has further debilitated the sector: Egypt earned just $ 4 billion in tourist revenues last year, a quarter of what it had anticipated before the global health crisis.

Today, Al-Qaramus has 25 farms trying to make ends meet by selling papyrus, compared to around 500 prior to the revolution, according to farmer and artist Said Tarakhan.

“I lost about 80 percent of my total income – I used to earn nearly $ 1,000 a month and now it’s almost zero,” the 60-year-old told AFP as he showed off his replica Tutankhamun paintings.

‘It will return’
The papyrus plant, with its fan-shaped foliage, grows in water and can reach four meters (13 feet) in height. Its form has served as inspiration for decorating the columns of ancient Egyptian temples.

To make paper, workers use wire to cut the stems into thin strips, which are immersed in water and then layered on top of each other to create sheets.

The sheets are placed into a compressor to compact them, and the resulting paper is left to dry in the sun before being decorated with writing or colorful designs.

Papyrus workshop owner Abdel Mobdi Mussalam, 48, said his staff has dwindled from eight a decade ago to just two.

“Papyrus is our only source of income. It’s what feeds me and my children,” he told AFP.

Tarakhan said he was trying to branch out into other papyrus products such as notebooks and sketchbooks.

A few months ago, his son Mohammed launched an online store to sell their new range.

“At first, we were just selling locally to those who came to us, but after Covid, we thought that we could reach more people, and even foreigners, through the internet,” the 30-year-old said.

“We are trying to think differently so that we can carry on,” said the elder Tarakhan, who in 2014 founded a local association for papyrus craftspeople.

“I thank Covid-19 for locking us in our homes and forcing us to improve our business model.”

Near the famous Giza Pyramids around 100 kilometers away, Ashraf al-Sarawi displays papyrus paintings in his large shop, devoid of tourists.

He said he lost most of his income last year due to the pandemic, but expressed hope that tourism would pick up soon.

“Tourism never dies,” the 48-year-old said. “It may get sick for a while, but it will return.”


Source link

]]>
https://songhaizeng.com/egypt-papyrus-makers-keep-tradition-alive-despite-tourism-slump-art-culture/feed/ 0
OKC Zoo Announces Art Competition Winners | Community https://songhaizeng.com/okc-zoo-announces-art-competition-winners-community/ https://songhaizeng.com/okc-zoo-announces-art-competition-winners-community/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 19:07:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/okc-zoo-announces-art-competition-winners-community/ The Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden and Pepsi have announced the winners of this year’s Pepsi Vending Machine Art Contest. This spring, Kindergarten to Grade 12 students in Oklahoma were invited to participate in the annual art competition and share creative ideas on recycling. The competition was launched in 2004 and continues to provide […]]]>

The Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden and Pepsi have announced the winners of this year’s Pepsi Vending Machine Art Contest.

This spring, Kindergarten to Grade 12 students in Oklahoma were invited to participate in the annual art competition and share creative ideas on recycling.

The competition was launched in 2004 and continues to provide Oklahoma students with a unique experience to raise awareness of environmental concerns and conservation.

Using the theme of this year’s competition, “Wild About Recycling,” students shared ideas about recycling for the chance to showcase their creations on a Pepsi dispenser for an entire year at the OKC Zoo and win additional prizes. at OKC points of sale and the zoo. Contest designs were judged on creativity, originality, adherence to artistic specifications, and theme relevance. A total of 752 applications were submitted by students representing 31 towns and cities in Oklahoma.

“This annual partnership between OKC Zoo and Pepsi is a great way to get young people in Oklahoma involved in recycling, while encouraging expression and creativity,” said Candice Rennels, director of public relations. from the zoo.

The zoo is dedicated to the preservation of wildlife through partnerships in conservation, education, awareness, research, and initiatives in the park, such as recycling. Customers can help make a difference by recycling plastic water bottles, using their own reusable water bottles, following recycling signs, and packing snacks that are low in plastic.

The winners are:

Grand Prize (K-5): Andrew Lim, fifth year, Edmond, Deer Creek Fourth and Fifth Center

Grand prize (6-12): Thomas Buchanan, Grade 11, Newalla, Harrah High School

The two grand prize recipients will receive a $ 300 gift card from an OKC outlet store and a certificate. Their winning artwork will be the cover of a Pepsi dispenser in the zoo entrance plaza for one year.

Second Prize (K-5): John Paul M. Zenone, Kindergarten, Luther, Homeschool

Second prize (6-12): Tegan Watson, Grade 11, Fletcher, Elgin High School, class of Ruth Crittendon

The two second prize recipients will receive a ZOOfriends membership and certificate. Their creations will be exhibited at the zoo.

Best Zoo Director Honor Roll Award:

Honor roll recipients will receive a certificate and their creations will be on display at the zoo.

– AZA Choice: Jaylee Soukup, Grade 12, Ardmore, Plainview High School, class of Greg Dudley

– Can Do Attitude: Ashlynn Chia, seventh grade, Norman, Whittier Middle School, class of Cynthia Charboneau

– Conservation Champion: Amelia Lim, fourth year, Edmond, Deer Creek Fourth and Fifth Center

– Habitat Heroes: Kenah Downing, eighth grade, Piedmont, College of Piedmont, class of Melody Carney

– H2O Honor: Mekko Frejo-Bobo, fifth grade, Moore, Red Oak Elementary School, class of Claire Henthorn-Pate

– Nature Navigator: Claire Cobble, third grade, Moore, Wayland Bonds Elementary School, Mrs. Hugh’s class

– Green Dream: Sarah Shawver, eighth grade, Weatherford, homeschool

– Rally for recycling: Elizabeth Tham, sixth grade, Edmond, Heartland Middle School, class of Sara Larsen

– Sustainability Superstar: Brock Bailey, Grade 12, Collinsville, Homeschool

– Protector of Wildlife: Fabian Ramirez Esparza, Grade 12, Guthrie, Guthrie High School, Lindsey Baker’s class

The winners of the competition will be recognized at an awards show, hosted by the OKC Zoo and Pepsi, later this month, where their artistic creations will be launched.

The zoo is currently open in the summer and open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., with the last entry no later than 4 p.m. Residents can purchase tickets in advance at okczoo.org/tickets to avoid the queues. The zoo offers free general admission for guests on weekday afternoons August 2-6; 9-13 and 16-20. Advance reservations are required at okczoo.org/tickets for all guests and ZOOfriends members wishing to visit; capacity is limited to six people per reservation.

Regular admission is $ 12 for adults and $ 9 for children 3-11 and those 65 and over. Children 2 and under are admitted free. Residents can support the OKC Zoo by becoming a member of ZOOfriends. Starting at $ 45, memberships can be purchased at ZOOfriends.org and grant access to the OKC Zoo for an entire year, plus additional benefits and discounts. To learn more, call 424-3344 or visit okczoo.org.


Source link

]]>
https://songhaizeng.com/okc-zoo-announces-art-competition-winners-community/feed/ 0