Graphic Art – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 23:46:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://songhaizeng.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-138x136.png Graphic Art – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ 32 32 The story behind Off-White’s ‘Impossible Blue’ eyeliner https://songhaizeng.com/the-story-behind-off-whites-impossible-blue-eyeliner/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 20:11:34 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/the-story-behind-off-whites-impossible-blue-eyeliner/ “Celebration” was the name of Off-White’s spring runway show, presented last night inside Ateliers Berthier in Paris. X-ray printed blazers, belly cutouts and cowboy boots with arrowheads filled the industrial space built by architect Charles Garner and used to store sets for the Paris Opera. It was a perfect place to pay homage to Virgil […]]]>

“Celebration” was the name of Off-White’s spring runway show, presented last night inside Ateliers Berthier in Paris. X-ray printed blazers, belly cutouts and cowboy boots with arrowheads filled the industrial space built by architect Charles Garner and used to store sets for the Paris Opera. It was a perfect place to pay homage to Virgil Abloh, the late multi-hyphenate designer, who began work on this season’s Spring 2023 collection before his passing last year.

As he examined and experimented with each piece that paraded on the “Impossible Blue” catwalk last night, Ibrahim Kamara, Off-White’s new artistic and image director, realized that it was a celebration. After all, Abloh was often drawn to the warm indigo hue, which lined the catwalk and punctuated models’ looks, courtesy of the blue pigments from the Paperwork beauty collection, for the runway.

Photographed by Acielle / Style Du Monde | @styledumonde

“I wanted to be pretty playful, but glam rock,” makeup artist Hiromi Ueda said backstage as she held the Maze shade of Paperwork’s Multi-Purpose Pencils in her hand. “It’s beautiful, sexy and confident.” Ueda relied on just two of the beauty line’s color sticks, Maze and Jet (an inky black), to complete each look. For the sooty looks, Jet was smudged around the edges with a blender brush for a smoky effect and, of course, finished with a touch of Maze on the lower waterline. The more subtle version seen on models of all genders, and particularly those wearing white (called the “pure” look), consisted of Maze drawn along the lower waterline and wiped away for an “eye- worn liner” which was almost imperceptible.

Visible on the other side of the cavernous pieces, however, were the “bright blue” graphic fenders that hairstylist Jawara called a “harder blue look.” He and Ueda discussed the glam rock direction before the show, where words like “tough” and “playful” described the vibe. Jawara eventually gave the models wispy mullet and pixie wigs alongside cornrows, slicked backs and a cerulean buzz cut. “I think they complement the hair really well,” Jawara said of the final makeup look. “We imagined it together.” It reflects Off-White’s larger goal of elevating its coterie of artists and speaks to the spirit of collaboration that continues to define Abloh’s legacy.

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Documenta 15 in the shadow of the Russian-Ukrainian war https://songhaizeng.com/documenta-15-in-the-shadow-of-the-russian-ukrainian-war/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 22:30:54 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/documenta-15-in-the-shadow-of-the-russian-ukrainian-war/ Posted inComics “What does it mean to come from a country with a fascist regime?” asks Russian dissident artist Victoria Lomasko. Artists reflect on the history of oppressive power structures in Brazil in this exhibit at the Visual Arts Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Although troubled by allegations of anti-Semitism, 738,000 people […]]]>

Posted inComics

“What does it mean to come from a country with a fascist regime?” asks Russian dissident artist Victoria Lomasko.

Social Fabric: Art and Activism in Contemporary Brazil

Artists reflect on the history of oppressive power structures in Brazil in this exhibit at the Visual Arts Center at the University of Texas at Austin.

Documenta 15 ends with strong turnout despite controversy

Although troubled by allegations of anti-Semitism, 738,000 people attended, a modest drop of 17% from the previous, pre-pandemic edition.

The fake art industry is booming online

From pages of exhibition catalogs marketed as original prints to “authorized” fake copies of Harings and Warhols, we live in the golden age of art piracy.

Visible from above, a bold new installation signals that art is part of everyday life in Bentonville, Arkansas.

The seductive music of James Joyce's Ulysses

Ultimately, the legacy of the classic modernist novel may lie in how carefully and scrupulously it focuses on the music of hesitant, chaotic, and open city lives.

The hidden poetry of everyday life

More than 100 modest, intimate-scale artworks in Still Life and the Poetry of Place offer a glimpse into interiors, both humble and opulent.

Come study in the MFA and MA programs at the University at Buffalo

Funding options at UB include full scholarships for MFA students, the Arthur A. Schomburg Scholarship Program, and additional opportunities for MA students.

Tagged: Documenta 15, Germany, Kassel, Russia, War in Ukraine

Victoria Lomasko is a Russian political artist who was based in Moscow until March 2022. Her book Other Russias, a collection of “graphic reporting”, has been published in six countries. A… More by Victoria Lomasko

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Hallyu! The Korean Wave Review – A Dazzling Historical Remix | Art https://songhaizeng.com/hallyu-the-korean-wave-review-a-dazzling-historical-remix-art/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 14:20:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/hallyu-the-korean-wave-review-a-dazzling-historical-remix-art/ IIf you don’t recognize the Squid Game guard costumes looming at the V&A with their cherry suits and geometric masks– where were you? This dystopian television series was watched by over 100 million viewers in over 80 countries when it was released last year. It’s part of the global pop culture boom from South Korea […]]]>

IIf you don’t recognize the Squid Game guard costumes looming at the V&A with their cherry suits and geometric masks where were you? This dystopian television series was watched by over 100 million viewers in over 80 countries when it was released last year. It’s part of the global pop culture boom from South Korea that Hallyu! Korean for “wave” famous.

The reason this hit V&A show translates so well is that it portrays its own desires and concerns as universal: it recognizes no boundaries. In a century when many have grown wary of globalization, fleeing an economically and technologically unified world towards a renewed nationalism, South Korea has taken the opposite course. There is no Krexit. This society encompasses everything and everyone.

Fashion is fundamental… A floral jacket designed by Kim Seo Ryong and worn by Jin of K-Pop group BTS in Hallyu! The Korean wave. Photography: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

This prospect was anticipated by the late Korean-American video artist Nam June Paik: his 1986 installation Mirage Stage is an early highlight of the show. Its range of shimmering television screens celebrates a Zen-like hypnotic embrace of the endless and limitless possibilities of global communication. This mix here includes everything from Psy’s 2012 mega-hit Gangnam Style on an opening video wall, to a space where you can try dancing K-pop, to a spectacular exhibition of contemporary versions of the dress. Korean traditional hanbok.

Fashion is fundamental in the soft argument of this exhibition, because it actually has one under the infectious soundtrack. You are surrounded by clothes that are both futuristic and ancient, a dazzling historical remix. Until late in the 20th century, Korea was a pre-industrial society with venerable customs. From 1910 to 1945, this identity survived colonization by the Japanese Empire. The hanbok style, with wide skirts for women and silk robes for men, expressed this old Korea: it was threatened again when South Korea began to industrialize after the Korean War. But now, there seem to be endless ways to reinvent the hanbok, from a lace-trimmed black and white suit worn by K-pop star RM to a deconstructed undergarment dress designed by Suh Younghee. Floral designs are taken to ecstatic extremes, from subtle gray petals to huge pink blooms to a giant peony-like dress.

It’s also in fashion that you see one of the most appealing aspects of K-pop culture, its absence of stale images of the genre. Not only do male and female clothes blend together, but so does female and male beauty. There’s a whole section on cosmetics and beauty care that shows how Korean stars achieve their looks, from actor Lee Dong-wook modeling Chanel’s Boy cosmetics to pioneering use of green tea as skincare. skin. A statue of Gwon Osang of K-pop idol G-Dragon as an angelic matador piercing a fallen demon with his spear depicts both G-Dragon and his vanquished foe with exquisite androgynous beauty.

Free from all cultural purity… Untitled G-Dragon, A Space of No Name by Gwon Osang.
Free from all cultural purity… Untitled G-Dragon, A Space of No Name by Gwon Osang. Photography: © Courtesy of Gwon Osang

This deliriously kitsch piece of art also highlights what might be the most alluring aspect of South Korean pop culture: its lack of any form of cultural purity. He blithely ransacks Western art. G-Dragon’s heroic pose is modeled after Christian images of Saint George and Archangel Michael. Why not? They bring as much grist to the mill as the Buddhist tradition in this vision of the urban, digital and post-everything world.

You can enter a curtained booth, defying the content warning, to watch a big-screen clip of a street fight from Park Chan-wook’s violent and surreal 2003 film Oldboy, and see the tattered wig worn by its star Choi Min-sik. Oldboy is a glorious example of Korean wave pick’n’mix globalism: it’s based on a Japanese manga version of the classic French novel The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas.

Gangnam, the show reveals, is a wealthy neighborhood in Seoul. Its rise from rural suburb to glamorous high-rise neighborhood is chronicled here. But not everyone lives the Gangnam way: you can peek into the tiny, squalid bathroom set of the poor family in the Oscar-winning film Parasite. The universality of Korean culture includes the dramatization of the conflicts and injustices it shares with the rest of the world – which is the dramatic heart of Squid Game.

Yet the overwhelming feel of K-pop culture, this thrilling show proves, is a joyful embrace of the flow of modernity, an optimism that seems to have dried up elsewhere.

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Mona Al Marri opens the SGI Dubai lounge at the Dubai World Trade Center https://songhaizeng.com/mona-al-marri-opens-the-sgi-dubai-lounge-at-the-dubai-world-trade-center/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 11:42:45 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/mona-al-marri-opens-the-sgi-dubai-lounge-at-the-dubai-world-trade-center/ Her Excellency Mona Al Marri, Director General of the Dubai Government Media Office, today officially opened the 25th edition of Sign & Graphic Imaging (SGI) Dubai, the largest graphic imaging and signage exhibition in the Middle East. East, which will be held from September 19 to 21. at the World Trade Center in […]]]>


Her Excellency Mona Al Marri, Director General of the Dubai Government Media Office, today officially opened the 25th edition of Sign & Graphic Imaging (SGI) Dubai, the largest graphic imaging and signage exhibition in the Middle East. East, which will be held from September 19 to 21. at the World Trade Center in Dubai.

During her visit, Al Marri visited the different pavilions of the show and was informed about the latest technologies and solutions in the field. “Hosting the region’s premier trade show for the print and sign industry is further testament to Dubai’s growing importance as a premier destination for international trade events where industry players industry from all over the world are converging to share their knowledge and expertise. SGI Dubai offers an exceptional platform to discover new opportunities and drive industry growth. »

The 2022 edition of the show features innovations from global industry leaders including HP, Canon, Epson and Mimaki, among several other brands. Multinational brands from several countries, including the United States, South Korea, China, United Arab Emirates, India, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Pakistan, are also showcasing their cutting-edge products and solutions during of this three-day event.

Leading distributors across the region such as Arona Trading, Heliozid Océ, Magic Trading, Flex Europa and Worldwide Digital are also showcasing their advanced solutions. The 2022 edition has a particular focus on emerging trends in signage, especially digital signage, with presentations of innovative products from leading players such as Desert Sign, Rainbow and LED.

Sharif Rahman, CEO of International Expo Consults (IEC), said, “We are delighted to once again open the doors to the world and welcome SGI Dubai as an in-person event. We’ve been instrumental in building the show over the past few decades. SGI Dubai is not just a B2B exhibition, but an innovation ecosystem that connects all the bright minds from various vertical industries. Demand within the printing and signage industry has returned to a strong growth trajectory, with industry stakeholders also seeing signs of growth since the start of this year. »

SGI Dubai is the region’s largest trade show for sign makers, print production houses, gift and promotion companies, news agencies, shopping mall owners, the retail industry packaging, real estate developers, hospitality and tourism industries, 3D printing industry, architects, brands and image consultants among other stakeholders in the printing industries, signaling and imaging.

“As the leading trade show for the printing and sign industry, SGI Dubai has always been known to attract local, regional and international trade visitors every year. The show served as a seamless ecosystem for brands and innovative ideas and saw the participation of visionary regional and international brand leaders. Every year, international brands contribute machines worth more than US$250 million, providing opportunities for the industry to capitalize on the latest technologies to propel their business forward,” Rahman added.

Mr. Karthik, Chief Catalyst, SGI Dubai, said: “The majority of visitors to SGI Dubai are Tier 1 decision makers including CEOs and owners, as well as Tier 2 decision makers such as production, marketing and technical managers. . Over the years, SGI Dubai has provided the best return on investment to exhibitors and visitors. In addition, nearly 39% of trade visitors placed orders directly with exhibitors during the show.

“The Middle East and Africa are the next growth markets for large format printers, and we invite all stakeholders to engage with SGI Dubai and further capitalize on these emerging opportunities. We expect many visitors from the region to visit the show this year. As always, our show will continue to lay a solid foundation for the industry in the post-pandemic era and support trade visitors seeking the latest in large format printing, textile printing, retail retail, LED, digital signage and related technologies,” added Karthik.

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Sick, sad or in need of comfort? Young adult fiction can be the perfect balm | Books https://songhaizeng.com/sick-sad-or-in-need-of-comfort-young-adult-fiction-can-be-the-perfect-balm-books/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 22:46:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/sick-sad-or-in-need-of-comfort-young-adult-fiction-can-be-the-perfect-balm-books/ There’s something about a mild case of the flu that instantly sends me back to my childhood. Usually, when illness strikes, I go to my parents’ house, pull out my teddy bear-shaped heat pack, and dramatically lay down on the couch, periodically asking for mac and cheese or cups of tea. There, my favorite indulgence […]]]>

There’s something about a mild case of the flu that instantly sends me back to my childhood.

Usually, when illness strikes, I go to my parents’ house, pull out my teddy bear-shaped heat pack, and dramatically lay down on the couch, periodically asking for mac and cheese or cups of tea.

There, my favorite indulgence is taking a bath while regressing to my childhood library. It’s packed with my oldest and most beloved classics – Winnie the Pooh, Anne of Green Gables, The Secret Garden and the Famous Five.

After I hit my mid-twenties, my favorite teen young adult novels gave me the same pleasure. 2000’s seminal romance The Princess Diaries is a favorite, as is Sarah Dessen, both expressing the specific, all-consuming sentiment of a 15-year-old crush that is never achieved again.

When I fell ill this winter, however, it was the first time I had been sick and alone in a foreign city. I couldn’t go home with my old books and felt vulnerable in a new way. I stared at my library. I love The Bell Jar, but do I want to read it when I’m feverish and sweaty? Nobody makes me feel like Toni Morrison, but with a head full of snot?

Instead, I did what any reasonable adult would have done: I put on a mask, a comically large jacket, and went to a bookstore.

Thus began my obsession with young adult fiction, a category traditionally marketed to teens and tweens ages 12-18. In two days, I finished the entire Heartstopper series – a graphic novel and queer romance recently popularized by an extremely cute Netflix program.

I had dug my toes into it, and now I was ready to take the plunge.

A few days later, I went back to the bookstore, a little embarrassed, and bought all the works of fiction that Heartstopper author Alice Oseman has written. Solitaire – published when she was just 19 – was great, but I especially loved Radio Silence, a book I wish I had read as a teenager that skilfully navigates mental illness, school pressure and friendships.

Jeanmarie Morosin, head of children’s publishing at Hachette – which brought Heartstopper to Australia – says it didn’t surprise her that Oseman’s works appealed to older readers.

“For me, why young adulthood is such an emotional punch is that it brings you to a time before you’ve made all the big decisions in your life, when everything is in front of you and everything is dramatic,” she said.

“As an adult, you had loves that worked or didn’t work out, you chose your career – but it takes you back to that exciting time of being on the verge of becoming…you won’t have never again.”

“It takes you back to that exciting time of being about to become,” the screen adaptation of Heartstopper premiered earlier this year. Picture: Netflix

The books have changed since I grew up too. In those I read when I was in the target demographic, the romances were between a boy and a girl and characters of color took a back seat; they certainly weren’t talking about issues of gender and racial discrimination, like Starr in my next buy, The Hate U Give.

“YA was ahead of its time. It’s almost a problem if it’s not diversified,” Morosin says.

“It is a testimony and a reflection of the realities of the teenagers who read these books, of their expectations and the way they will express themselves about them. The publishers were catching up with this request.

“People grew up and didn’t see themselves reflected in books and art. By producing books for everyone, you create a safe space.

The most beloved authors of my childhood were Jacqueline Wilson and Cathy Cassidy – funny and warm British writers who heartily told stories of young girls in working-class families, unafraid to write about adoption and divorce. .

Wilson won the Guardian Award in 2000 for The Illustrated Mum, a beautiful novel about two sisters struggling with their mother’s mental illness and the messy way families love and care for each other.

She’s still writing books two decades later, at 76 — and so is Cathy Cassidy.

Cassidy described her own love of books for young readers in the Guardian’s list of her top 10 feel-good novels, which included Stargirl, Jerry Spinelli’s modern day fairy tale, Michael Morpurgo’s Kensuke’s Kingdom and my favorite, The Secret. Garden.

“We all love a book that makes us all feel warm inside, happy to be alive, even though it’s often touching, bittersweet stories,” she said.

Editor Morosin agrees: there is “comfort” in a familiar and beloved tale.

“You re-read them because you know what’s going on,” she says.

“It sounds corny, but…if I can give a child that comfort and nostalgia for the rest of their life, what a privilege.”

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Photographer Julia Gorton captures Pensacola with 309 Punk Project https://songhaizeng.com/photographer-julia-gorton-captures-pensacola-with-309-punk-project/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 03:03:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/photographer-julia-gorton-captures-pensacola-with-309-punk-project/ The 309 Punk Project photographer welcome Julia Gortonknown for documenting the ‘no wave‘ of the 1970s and 1980s, as artist in residence this month. Capturing a brief era with a unique style and avant-garde music, Gorton photographed the pioneers of the scene, including Debbie Harry, Patti Smith, Iggy Pop, David Byrne and many others. Moving […]]]>

The 309 Punk Project photographer welcome Julia Gortonknown for documenting the ‘no wave‘ of the 1970s and 1980s, as artist in residence this month. Capturing a brief era with a unique style and avant-garde music, Gorton photographed the pioneers of the scene, including Debbie Harry, Patti Smith, Iggy Pop, David Byrne and many others.

Moving to New York to study design and later working for magazines like National Lampoon and Conde Nast, Gorton found herself at the heart of this new scene. She was also roommates with fashion designer Anya Phillips, who co-founded the Mudd Club, a pop-up nightclub that hosted a variety of No Wave artists.

“I ended up being more of a photographer because it was a lot more immediate and social, and I could do that while I was studying design,” Gorton said.

During his two-week stay in Pensacola, Gorton transformed 309’s headquarters into an open portrait studio. She says that during her residency she photographed over 100 people in five studio sessions.

“The idea is, for me, to practice interacting with people and documenting people with photos,” Gorton said. “This project is really about creating a visual sense of community.”

Hunter Morrison

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WUWF Public Media

Julia Gorton

Gorton’s first portrait project took place in 2018 in London Condemned Gallery in collaboration with the photographer Ollie Murphy. Subsequently, she wanted to recreate the project but did not know where to set the scene.

“I came to Pensacola about five years ago and absolutely loved the people I had met here,” Gorton said. “Following them through social media, I saw and loved the work that was being done at 309. After I was able to purchase the building and work to become a non-profit organization, they opened the residency program and I I thought, ‘I would love to come back to Pensacola. Luckily Valerie George asked me to.

“I love that Julia’s art is intuitive, thoughtful and honest,” George said. “She has a real talent for seeing a kind of beauty in her subjects that most traditional photographers overlook. She seeks reality and humanity in everyone she meets, which shows in her work. She loves people, and you can feel it when she turns her camera on you.

The closing exhibition of Gorton’s open studio project featured approximately 300 images, spanning the walls of 309. Gorton donated all of these photographs to the archives of 309, which will be displayed at Pensacola Museum of Art in March 2023.

“Honestly, I had no idea I could look like this to other people,” Jocelyn Brown, photographed by Gorton told 309. “Even more than that, I’m amazed at how Julia was able to capture the spirit and humanity of our entire community of people and our totality, and just show the truth about who we are as strangers.

“The whole experience was very beautiful,” said Cheraldine Vaurigoud, also photographed by Gorton. “I had never done anything like this before, nor [my partner] and me together like this. It was so intimate, and she was so sweet and loving. I feel like we were seen, and it was beautiful to be seen from our inner being.

“I love Julia Gorton’s work,” said Nell Arnett, photographed by Gorton. “It’s really cool to be able to see these photographs and collages in person, especially as a graphic designer who draws a lot of inspiration from his zines and his work. It’s just awesome to be able to meet her in person and see how cool she is.

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Hunter Morrison

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WUWF Public Media

“I just don’t think I could have really met nicer, more interesting people than I met last week,” Gorton said. “It’s been awesome.”

Throughout her open studio sessions, Gorton says she learned a lot about portrait photography and the lenses that come with photographing new people. She says people can seem very different when talking to you about who they are on camera.

“I think about [this project] like really one piece,” Gorton said. “It’s a piece made up of multiple images that work together to tell the story of this engagement.”

Gorton admits that when she started her career in photography in the mid-1970s, it was a way to get involved in a music and cultural scene she was a fan of. She hopes that when people look at her photographs from that time, they too can feel some of the essence and energy of what it was like to be part of the No Wave scene.

“While her early work is about artists and musicians who have become larger than life, by the time she was documenting them they were her peers,” George said. “They were young people discovering their talents and their purpose. At 309, we recognize that our community is full of incredibly creative people who deserve to be seen. We knew that Julia would really do this beautiful job of looking at us, really seeing us and documenting all of us.

“Pensacola don’t know what they had in [Gorton] come here,” Brown said. “Honestly and bluntly, Julia Gorton is a legend. These are photos that I grew up seeing in books about a musical subculture that I wanted to be a part of, so knowing she’s here visiting our community and that the residence is breathtaking.

Gorton is optimistic that his open studio photographs have captured the spirit of Pensacola and its local punk scene. She hopes it will uplift people who may be overlooked or underrepresented.

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Hunter Morrison

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WUWF Public Media

“I hope people felt excited when they stepped out of their comfort zone, and if they put in the effort, they too can be a part of that scene,” Gorton said. “Sometimes you can find yourself on the outside looking in, thinking ‘I wish I could be a part of this’, but coming into this photo studio, you are a part of it.”

To see more of Gorton’s work, click here. You can also follow her on Instagram @julia_gorton_nowave.

To learn more about the 309 Punk project, click on here.

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Immigrant brothers created the hand-drawn posters of New York for decades https://songhaizeng.com/immigrant-brothers-created-the-hand-drawn-posters-of-new-york-for-decades/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/immigrant-brothers-created-the-hand-drawn-posters-of-new-york-for-decades/ Hand-drawn posters kept catching Aviram Cohen’s eye as he strolled through his neighborhood in Queens, NY These were colorful, nostalgic advertisements with a distinct style that hung outside several stores and restaurants. Cohen – who builds and installs exhibits in museums and galleries – was eager to find out who was behind the posters. It […]]]>

Hand-drawn posters kept catching Aviram Cohen’s eye as he strolled through his neighborhood in Queens, NY

These were colorful, nostalgic advertisements with a distinct style that hung outside several stores and restaurants. Cohen – who builds and installs exhibits in museums and galleries – was eager to find out who was behind the posters. It was not easy.

“I found them by going from restaurant to restaurant until someone had their phone number,” said Cohen, 42, adding that he hoped to order a sign for the yoga and Pilates studio in his wife, 2nd Story Pilates + Yoga in Jackson Heights.

When artists Carlos and Miguel Cevallos met him at his wife’s studio to discuss potential designs for a poster that day in 2018, Cohen was stunned to see “two charming brothers in suits show up “, did he declare.

As it turns out, the Cevallos brothers are immigrant bachelors in their 80s who for decades spent their days in their shared Manhattan apartment hand-crafting advertising posters. They make it a point to wear a suit and tie whenever they leave their Upper East Side home.

They had long relied on word of mouth to bring in new customers, and that was enough to keep them busy.

Then Cohen suggested they take to social media to curate and archive their work. Maybe it could also bring them new business.

“It should be documented so it doesn’t go away,” Cohen said. “I admired their art and thought other people would appreciate it too.”

Cohen offered to create an Instagram account for the brothers, who were born in Ecuador and raised in Colombia. They agreed with the idea.

Little did the brothers know this encounter would lead to booming business, and then their art becoming a fixture in popular restaurants, food trucks and bars across the five boroughs.

“It’s almost like a second act,” Cohen said of the brothers’ recent string of hits.

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Their Instagram account has over 27,000 followers and new commissions are pouring in every week through their direct messages.

They were featured in the New Yorker and also in Eater New York, which wrote that commissioning the brothers’ art is “something of a rite of passage for restaurant and bar owners” and described their work as “charming for its cheeky detail, nostalgic lettering and general lack of interest in perfection.

After this first meeting between Cohen and the Cevallos brothers, the men forged a close bond. Cohen said he wanted to know more about their history and their shared love of art. The brothers speak limited English and have corresponded with The Washington Post via email.

Throughout their childhood, “we always made art and discovered artists,” said Carlos, 84, who spoke on behalf of himself and his brother.

The siblings, along with their older brother, Victor, opened a sign shop in Bogotá in 1966. Victor – who first came to attention in the early 1960s while traveling through the Central America by drawing caricatures of guests in hotel lobbies – taught his younger brothers everything he knew about art.

“We learned everything from Victor,” Carlos explained. “He inspired us to be artists.”

In addition to making signs, “we had exhibits everywhere,” he added.

After Victor moved to New York in 1969, his brothers eventually followed him. Carlos arrived first in 1974 and produced posters with Victor in a small art studio in Times Square, then in Queens.

Miguel, 81, stayed in Bogotá to care for their mother, who died at 101. In 2005, he moved to New York to reunite with his brothers.

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The three Cevallos siblings worked side by side, using acrylic paint and Sharpies to create posters for various businesses, primarily in the Corona and Jackson Heights neighborhoods of Queens. They have also placed their works in exhibitions across New York, including El Museo del Barrio and MoMA PS1.

After Victor’s death in 2012, Miguel and Carlos carried on their brother’s legacy by continuing to create custom posters. Miguel describes the letters and images, and Carlos is the colorist.

“That’s how Victor and I work, so we keep it that way,” Carlos said. “Miguel was watching and learning how Victor made the letters and designed the poster. Later he created his own style.

For many years business remained steady, but as the hospitality industry suffered from the pandemic, so too did the Cevallos brothers, whose regular customers could no longer afford to order their work. It was then that the Instagram account became essential.

Commission requests from trendy restaurants and bars – first in New York, then around the world – have started arriving in their inboxes, with companies aiming to attract customers after the pandemic shutdown and also support local creators. The brothers, Cohen said, were thrilled with the new attention.

“They had success exhibiting their artwork in the ’80s, and it’s like a rebirth,” Cohen said.

Recently, New York establishments – such as La Bonbonnière, Van Leeuwen Ice Cream, Baz Bagel and Lucia Pizza of Avenue X – commissioned posters. The brothers have also received inquiries from potential clients across the United States, as well as overseas — from Spain, South Korea, Europe and elsewhere, they said.

Salvatore Carlino, owner of Lucia Pizza on Avenue X in Brooklyn, came across the Cevallos brothers’ artwork on Instagram, and “I just fell in love with the style,” he said. “To me, that screams New York signage.”

Carlino became even more interested in having them create a poster for his restaurant, he said, once he found out about the men who made the art.

“There’s the appeal that they have of being these two older gentlemen, and they’ve been doing that for so many years,” he said. “It’s awesome.”

Happy David, who manages social media and partnerships for La Bonbonnière – a restaurant in the West Village – felt the same way about the brothers’ work.

“You can still see the brush strokes behind. It’s a person, it’s not graphic design,” said David, who also manages Casa Magazines’ Instagram account and commissioned the brothers to do a sign for the famous newsstand. “It’s not perfect; it’s fun and homemade, and I think that’s what draws me to their work.

The brothers also produced posters for barbershops, art suppliers, music stores, and even law firms. They designed custom pieces and make merchandise, such as t-shirts and sweatshirts.

The price of posters varies greatly depending on the nature of the client and the project, and the time spent on each piece varies considerably. Usually they work on about six posters a week.

Cohen meets regularly with the brothers to sift through new commission requests and manage the account. His relationship with the Cevallos brothers is family, Cohen said, adding that he wasn’t paid to help them — and he didn’t want to.

“We meet and hang out. We go to museums and have lunch,” said Cohen, who described the brothers as “very old-fashioned, very modest, and very dedicated to their family.”

The sibling duo – who, in addition to art, are passionate about opera – have no plans to part with their pens and brushes anytime soon. They intend to make art indefinitely.

“Fate is like that,” Carlos told The Associated Press. “Sometimes you find success later in life.”

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Immortality Review: Its Flawed People Are Perfect, But The Game Isn’t https://songhaizeng.com/immortality-review-its-flawed-people-are-perfect-but-the-game-isnt/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 14:58:20 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/immortality-review-its-flawed-people-are-perfect-but-the-game-isnt/ Available on: PC, Xbox Series X and Series S Developer: Half Mermaid | Editor: Half Mermaid Spoiler Warning: This review covers the plot and mechanics of “Immortality” in detail. Do not continue if you want to preserve the surprises of the story. Earlier this year, I learned of sexual misconduct allegations made against a musician […]]]>

Available on: PC, Xbox Series X and Series S

Developer: Half Mermaid | Editor: Half Mermaid

Spoiler Warning: This review covers the plot and mechanics of “Immortality” in detail. Do not continue if you want to preserve the surprises of the story.

Earlier this year, I learned of sexual misconduct allegations made against a musician whose work sparked my love of music. It was a disconcerting revelation – partly because the musician had existed for me mostly in the abstract. He was an incisive chronicler of teenage anxiety and suburban malaise, a prophet of twentieth-century alienation; Yet I could barely imagine him in the flesh, a person with hobbies, habits, ticks, flaws, and routines, let alone someone prone to missteps, misunderstandings, and well worse. In my mind, he was constantly in the mode of the philosophical poet. Suddenly the blurry image came into focus: an unwanted kiss, a tongue shoved down a young woman’s throat.

How well can you really get to know someone through their art? This question is among the most decided by “Immortality”, a new video game from the famous art game designer Sam Barlow. In “Immortality,” players navigate software that serves as a repository for the work of Marissa Marcel, an aspiring movie star whose non-career and eventual demise from the art world forms the game’s central mystery. browsing through interviews, filmed rehearsals, chemistry tests between actors, behind-the-scenes footage and never-before-seen clips from the three films Marcel starred in – none of which have ever been released – players are told they can solve the mystery of the disappearance of the actress. .

After covid the escape rooms closed, these game designers have created a virtual one

Through these three films, the thematic concerns of “Immortality” become apparent, with identity and gender-based violence at the fore. Each is turned upside down, interrogated, reformatted into recurring symbols and patterns placed under harsher lighting and sharper cameras. But Marcel is of course not the characters she plays in her films, and what is captured on film is loaded with layers of performance and artificiality, which complicates the basic vanity of the software you are using. Mid-game, the Quagmire of Meaning exposes the mystery of “immortality” as just a ramp to deeper existential questions.

But stories need endings. As “immortality” approaches hers, her desire to conclude with something akin to clarity – an answer – dulls its impact.

Ambrosio, Marcel’s first film, is an adaptation of a novel about the devil’s seduction of Madrid’s holiest man, and the sins and weaknesses that allow his downfall. The titular character’s eloquence and good reputation belies his license. A servant of the devil, manifested as a woman made to look like the Virgin Mary, disguises herself as a young boy to enter the church and tempt Ambrosio. Behind the scenes, an otherwise good-natured director, round and cheerful, belittles his actresses during table readings and on set. The actors, in the spirit of the New Wave, touch and kiss each other with abandon on the set; Marcel boldly proclaims his comfort and artistic interest in the nude. Whether you believe it or not is another story. Can we know Marcel from the way she behaves – not to mention what she says at work?

People aren’t quite what they seem, Ambrosio tells us. With the images too, all is not as it seems. Early on, ominous beeps on some clips prompt players to rewind the reels to find their source; this reveals gruesome alternating images with different characters present: instead of Marcel and his cast mates, two ethereal figures (witches? vampires? angels? all of the above?) conduct a dialogue – about art , death, resurrection of Christ, etc. — from a millennial point of view.

This supernatural element is a compelling addition, until it isn’t. The two androgynous beings, credited as The One and The Other, say things that frame and complicate certain characters, their behaviors, and their arcs; the former is intended as a representation of creation, healing, love and art, the latter a substitute for control, destruction, fear and law. But while for much of the game the conversation between The One and The Other One parallels the central narrative, ultimately “Immortality” attempts to make explicit connections between the characters on screen and the spirits that haunt the images. . As the game approaches an “explanation” to its central questions, the framework provided by these beings becomes a vice.

A Plot for Video Game Novels: As TV Shows Rise, the Books Fade

Take Minsky, Marcel’s second film, a sordid crime film about a murdered artist after whom the film is named. Minsky’s muse, played by Marcel, is the number one suspect. The detective assigned to the case falls in love with her, and his desire draws him into a more sexually liberated underground culture. During production, Marcel accidentally kills Carl Goodman, the actor playing the detective, with a prop gun. The film was never released.

After discovering What arrived at Carl, I became preoccupied with the question of Why. At some point, I discovered a clip in which Marcel, in a low voice, confided to the director that Carl was hiding something: “He’s not who you think he is,” she said. At this point, with the space of possibility wide open, I was all for “immortality.” I pored over the clips, looking for any wandering glances or thrills in Marcel’s approach to Carl on set.

But after a fruitless search, I was shocked to learn that the game real answer was supernatural: “Carl was possessed by The Other, which brought him into conflict with Marcel, who was possessed by The One”, the game insists. There may be rich symbolic meaning there; I would challenge anyone to explain it in non-illusory terms. Simply put, it was a disappointing resolution to a conflict that was more poignant in its real implications than in the realm of symbols. “Nothing interests me less than explanations,” sings The One in a hidden scene. I just wish “Immortality” would commit to that idea.

Even when the main narrative fails, the instant gameplay is dizzying in all the best ways. During my journey through Minsky’s footage, I found clips that made Carl look like a libertine — the right kind: racy, fun, and sex-positive. Much later, however, in an unattended behind-the-scenes clip, we see that he is a chauvinist; he designates Marcel as the property of the director, for example. Not only are the sex-positive clips on set misleading, but so are the scripted movie cuts, which make up the bulk of Minsky’s footage. Carl, playing a character who was gradually liberalizing, had somehow convinced me that Carl himself was an open-minded social liberal. This characterization sleight of hand is “Immortality’s” most compelling feature. How well can you really get to know someone through their art?

The latest film, Two of Everything, is a story of princess and pauper mixed with a #MeToo revenge thriller; the images from the project’s production crown a limited body of work that nonetheless has clear thematic priorities: violence against women; how the notion of bad behavior by powerful men changes over the decades; instances of mistaken or assumed identity, and how these identities interact with the assumed “true” identity; public perception; Renaissance. They are all excellent interrogation points.

But eventually I ran into the problem of having to to play “Immortality.” The game is fun when the game is a mystery; even less when it comes to a puzzle. In “Immortality”, clips are not available by default, bringing players to the “match cut” mechanic. Clips can be paused at any time and browsed to find points of interest: a face, a prop, a backdrop, etc. Click on it and you are taken to another clip in the Library containing a similar item. (Selecting an actor will take you to a different clip with that actor; clicking on a flower in one movie may take you to a bouquet in the background of another). This mechanic is meant to draw attention to recurring patterns in the game, but by the time I’d seen about 95% of the library material, I wasn’t sure where to go next. After clicking for nearly an hour, I took to Reddit to find that I was missing a crucial snippet of the footage just before the penultimate clip, which I had already unlocked.

Some authors have described “immortality” as being on burnout or authorism (the later scenes can be read as evidence for this theory). But that’s not quite true, like saying Star Wars is on space. Art does not grant privileged access to decency or good nature. This is the game is, not what it is about. It’s text, not subtext. As long as ‘immortality’ uses this as a starting point to delve into, it’s a high point for the game in 2022. When characters are allowed to be people – not vampires or aliens or angels but people who are tired, embarrassed, excited, funny, naive, voyeuristic, scary and more – the richness of each image is its own reward.

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Flowics will present new solutions in Amsterdam https://songhaizeng.com/flowics-will-present-new-solutions-in-amsterdam/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/flowics-will-present-new-solutions-in-amsterdam/ Flowics will be present at IBC2022 in Amsterdam. Flowics experts will be on hand to show broadcasters of all kinds how easy it is to create captivating on-air graphics and interactive content with Flowics and how easily the Flowics platform integrates into their streaming. work. This year, the focus will be on creating data-driven broadcast […]]]>

Flowics will be present at IBC2022 in Amsterdam. Flowics experts will be on hand to show broadcasters of all kinds how easy it is to create captivating on-air graphics and interactive content with Flowics and how easily the Flowics platform integrates into their streaming. work. This year, the focus will be on creating data-driven broadcast graphics using Flowics Data Connectors with Flowics Graphics and Flowics Middleware for news, weather, sports, esports, and more.

Flowics data connectors
Data Connectors are native integrations of external third-party data providers built into Flowics Graphics’ cloud-based graphics engine. They allow live external data – such as live sports statistics or betting, weather, finance and cryptocurrency data – to be integrated into broadcast graphics without the time and expense of a developer. custom or manual data entry. Instead, data flows transparently from third parties to Flowics Graphics and designated cloud-based graphics files as noted. In this way, users can create state-of-the-art live graphics with the value-added information audiences expect, all in minutes and with little knowledge of graphic production.

In addition to its already robust data connector library, Flowics will introduce more data connectors for live sports and news production.

Additionally, the Flowics solution is flexible enough for the data connector architecture to integrate on-premises data sources through the Flowics middleware. This flexibility is particularly beneficial for users dealing with data sources that are only available on a local network and not on the Internet.

Finally, thanks to a recent update, Flowics Middleware will support Flowics data connectors. As a result, broadcasters who subscribe to Flowics Middleware and any of the available Flowics data connectors will be able to integrate live data from any of the 20+ data providers already natively integrated into their third-party graphics engine. choice. This means that Flowics customers will have many more options when using the connectors to create data-driven scatter graphs. Through this plug-and-play solution, select Flowics data connectors will be available for integration with on-premise graphics engines from third-party vendors such as Chyron, Ross, and Vizrt.

New graphical control interface
Also at IBC2022, Flowics will showcase another major Flowics Graphics update that will allow creative teams to reuse graphic templates and quickly create custom graphics previews for their live broadcasts. The release features a completely redesigned graphical control interface for managing graphical playlists and data connectors, previewing graphical overlays, and accessing real-time social media content and audience engagement.

“Our goal at Flowics is to empower producers and provide technology to captivate audiences. We help broadcast engineering and graphics teams reduce costs and effort, and make their workflows more flexible. It will be great to show IBC attendees why so many broadcasters in Europe and around the world already rely on the power of Flowics. — Gabriel Baños, CEO, Flowics

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Graphic Arts Design by WNC Students Featured in New Capital City Arts Initiative Exhibit | Carson City Nevada News https://songhaizeng.com/graphic-arts-design-by-wnc-students-featured-in-new-capital-city-arts-initiative-exhibit-carson-city-nevada-news/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 17:52:25 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/graphic-arts-design-by-wnc-students-featured-in-new-capital-city-arts-initiative-exhibit-carson-city-nevada-news/ Event date: Repeats every 9 days until Wed Nov 30 2022 . September 4, 2022 – 8:00 a.m. Event date: September 13, 2022 – 8:00 a.m. Event date: September 22, 2022 – 8:00 a.m. Event date: October 1, 2022 – 8:00 am Event date: October 10, 2022 – 8:00 am Event date: October 19, 2022 […]]]>

Event date:

Repeats every 9 days until Wed Nov 30 2022 .

September 4, 2022 – 8:00 a.m.

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September 13, 2022 – 8:00 a.m.

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September 22, 2022 – 8:00 a.m.

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October 1, 2022 – 8:00 am

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October 10, 2022 – 8:00 am

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October 19, 2022 – 8:00 am

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October 28, 2022 – 8:00 a.m.

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November 6, 2022 – 8:00 a.m.

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November 15, 2022 – 8:00 a.m.

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November 24, 2022 – 8:00 a.m.

Creativity and talent abound in the Capital City Arts Initiative’s “Extraordinary Graphics 2022” exhibit that showcases the graphic design work of Western Nevada College students.

The free exhibit is open to the public until November 30, 2022 at the Community Development Building (The Brick), 108 E Proctor Street, Carson City. The Brick is open to the public Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The video tour of the exhibition will soon be online at ccainv.org.

“Extraordinary Graphics 2022” shows posters of graphic design students from WNC’s Carson City campus. Participating students include Shiloh Cyphers, Jacob Flynt, Lauren Heggen, Sarai Jauregui-Rivas, Joseph Mikulak, Rafael Nieves, Erin Taylor and Heidi Thompson.

Their teacher, Jayna Conkey, said, “It’s rewarding to be a teacher when students respond with mature and exciting work. The creativity of the students was exceptional and each achieved a high mark.

Conkey described his homework: “The Futura, Garamond, Baskerville and Clarendon posters came from a typography assignment given in an intermediate graphic design class (GRC 210 – Type 1). The goal of this project was to expand creative approaches to typography and design while showcasing the story of a typeface.

Every font (typeface) on any given computer was designed by someone, probably hundreds of years ago. For this assignment, students had to choose a typeface and then research its history. Next, they created a poster that was to include a biography and image of the typeface designer as well as a dynamic display of the typeface elements (uppercase, lowercase, numbers, glyphs, and punctuation).

“The posters of David Carson, Saul Bass and Massimo Vignelli were assigned in an advanced graphic design course (GRC 220 – Graphic Design 1). As a tribute to some of the most recognized designers in the field of graphic design, students were asked to create a poster featuring a famous graphic designer. They had to research designers and, after choosing one, create a poster that reflected the designer’s style – without simply copying their work. During their research, they must have wondered what characteristics made this designer’s work so unique – what was their “claim to fame?” An understanding of these ideas helped them create visually interesting designs, echoing the work of Carson, Bass and Vignelli.

Sharon Rosse, Executive Director of CCAI, said, “The Initiative is delighted to present this great work – these were not easy assignments. Jayna Conkey’s lessons challenged the students and they rose to the occasion.

This exhibition adds to CCIC’s ongoing series of student exhibitions in the brick.

The Capital City Arts Initiative is an artist-centered, non-profit organization committed to community engagement in contemporary visual arts through exhibitions, arts education programs, illustrated lectures, residencies in artists and activities online.

The initiative is funded by the John Ben Snow Memorial Trust, the John and Grace Nauman Foundation, the Nevada Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts, Nevada Humanities and the National Endowment for the Humanities, Carson City Cultural Commission, US Bank Foundation , Kaplan Family Charitable Fund, Southwest Gas Corporation Foundation, Steele & Associates LLC and CCAI Sponsors and Members.

For more information, please visit the CCAI website at www.ccainv.org.

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