Graphic Art – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ Wed, 25 May 2022 07:07:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://songhaizeng.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-138x136.png Graphic Art – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ 32 32 ’10 good minutes just to go after transgender people’: James Acaster clip resurfaces after Ricky Gervais special https://songhaizeng.com/10-good-minutes-just-to-go-after-transgender-people-james-acaster-clip-resurfaces-after-ricky-gervais-special/ Wed, 25 May 2022 06:32:22 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/10-good-minutes-just-to-go-after-transgender-people-james-acaster-clip-resurfaces-after-ricky-gervais-special/ A clip from James Acaster’s 2019 stand-up show, which calls out comedian Ricky Gervais for his jokes about transgender people, has resurfaced on social media. Gervais’ new Netflix special has been condemned online for a series of jokes targeting the trans community. Viewers described the star’s show, SuperNature, as “toxic” and “transphobic” following its release […]]]>

A clip from James Acaster’s 2019 stand-up show, which calls out comedian Ricky Gervais for his jokes about transgender people, has resurfaced on social media.

Gervais’ new Netflix special has been condemned online for a series of jokes targeting the trans community.

Viewers described the star’s show, SuperNature, as “toxic” and “transphobic” following its release on Tuesday, May 24. Read quotes from the show here.

As fans and critics discuss SuperNaturemany shared a clip from Acaster’s set in which he mocks Gervais for his tendency to defend “freedom of expression” and denounce so-called “cancellation culture”.

A viral tweet following the show’s release said, “Nothing to say about Ricky Gervais that James Acaster hasn’t already said.”

User @ruth_walshe shared a clip from Acaster’s 1999 Cold Lasagna Hate Myself 1999 tour, in which the comedian takes aim at comics who spend much of their sets “going after transgender people.”

In the footage, he can be heard saying, “They say what they want, pissed off comedians. No one tells them what they can and cannot say. They walk straight on stage, sometimes at the head of their promotions, and do a good 10 minutes just to go after transgender people.

“People on the internet get mad about it… the comedian always says, ‘Bad luck, it’s my job, I’m a comedian, I’m here to challenge people. If you don’t like be challenged, don’t watch my show. What’s up guys, is it too hard for you?”

Acaster continues: “Yeah, because you know who’s been waiting a long time for a challenge? The trans community. They let their guard down too long, if you ask me. They’ll all check their privilege on the way home, thanks to you, brave little cis boy.

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“I used to name one of the comedians who was on point, in that routine, but it always got really awkward in the play because apparently it’s 2019, most people are still more happy to laugh at trans people but they’re not comfortable laughing at Ricky Gervais yet. This is the line.

The Independent contacted Gervais’ representative for comment.

In a two-star review for The IndependentNick Hilton wrote of SuperNature“As is all too common these days, the longest riff is reserved for the humiliation of trans people. “Full Disclosure”, [Gervais] reveals towards the end of the show, “in real life, of course, I support trans rights.”

“At this point, there’s a few stray cheers from the naïve few in the audience who think the irony is real, but it’s nothing compared to the peals of laughter and applause when the punchline – a crude joke about gender-affirming surgery – is coming.”

Last week, Gervais opened up about why he thinks people find his jokes offensive.

“People get offended when they confuse the subject of the joke with the real target and smart people know you can deal with anything, especially when it comes to something like irony” , Office creator told Stephen Colbert.

Netflix has previously come under fire for its decision to air content described by critics as transphobic, including in the case of comedian Dave Chappelle.

Chappelle’s specials for the streaming service have also been criticized for jokes targeting trans people. Netflix employees staged a strike last year in protest, with the employee who first criticized the company eventually resigning over the incident.

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Colin Cantwell, creator of ‘Star Wars’ Death Star, dies aged 90 https://songhaizeng.com/colin-cantwell-creator-of-star-wars-death-star-dies-aged-90/ Mon, 23 May 2022 13:17:58 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/colin-cantwell-creator-of-star-wars-death-star-dies-aged-90/ Written by Toyin Owoseje, CNN Colin Cantwell, the visual effects artist behind many of the original “Star Wars” movie’s iconic spaceships, has died aged 90. In an announcement on his Facebook page Sunday, Cantwell’s partner Sierra Dall said he died Saturday at his home in Colorado. A photo of the Death Star in “Return Of […]]]>

Written by Toyin Owoseje, CNN

Colin Cantwell, the visual effects artist behind many of the original “Star Wars” movie’s iconic spaceships, has died aged 90.

In an announcement on his Facebook page Sunday, Cantwell’s partner Sierra Dall said he died Saturday at his home in Colorado.

A photo of the Death Star in “Return Of The Jedi” (1983) Credit: Lucasfilm/Fox/Kobal/Shutterstock

“Colin Cantwell passed away peacefully at his home with me by his side. I will miss him very much,” she wrote.

Tributes poured in from fans and celebrities, including ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ director David Mandel, who showed an early illustration of X-Wing from his own collection on Twitter.

Cantwell was best known for designing and building prototype X-Wings, Star Destroyers, TIE Fighters, Death Stars and other ships for ‘Star Wars: A New Hope,’ the sci-fi franchise’s first film to be released. hit.

According to his website, he designed the spaceships used in the 1977 film two years earlier, building the models and photographing them when completed.

Cantwell’s website also noted that he was UCLA’s first animation graduate, after he persuaded the university to add an animation major.

A scene from

A scene from “Star Wars Episode IV — A New Hope” (1977) Credit: Lucasfilm/Fox/Kobal/Shutterstock

Before Hollywood called him, he fulfilled his childhood passion for space by working at NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, creating educational programs on recent developments in space exploration.

While at NASA, he fed CBS News anchor Walter Cronkite’s updates on the astronauts’ progress on the 1969 moon landing, which Cronkite then relayed to the television audience.

Away from the “Star Wars” franchise, Cantwell’s big-screen contributions include special photographic effects for “2001: A Space Odyssey,” technical dialogue for “Close Encounters of the Third Kind,” and computer graphics design consultant. for “WarGames”.

In 2014, an auction of some of his personal “Star Wars” artifacts, including starship designs, fetched more than $118,000, the Denver Post reported.

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Princeton High School Honor Roll | Lifestyles https://songhaizeng.com/princeton-high-school-honor-roll-lifestyles/ Sat, 21 May 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/princeton-high-school-honor-roll-lifestyles/ PSHS Honor Roll Princeton Senior High School announces the following students to their Fifth Period Honor Roll for the 2021/22 school year: 12th grade: “A” – Jenna Abdulrahman; Aidan Ash; Erica Baker; Elijah Bauer; Kinte Beckford; Rachel Belcher; Sadie Boggess; Camille Brett; Josiah Buckner; Hannah Catron; Alexis Colbird; Justin Cregger; Addie Cyrus; Dakotah Dalton; Alex […]]]>

PSHS Honor Roll

Princeton Senior High School announces the following students to their Fifth Period Honor Roll for the 2021/22 school year:

12th grade:

“A” – Jenna Abdulrahman; Aidan Ash; Erica Baker; Elijah Bauer; Kinte Beckford; Rachel Belcher; Sadie Boggess; Camille Brett; Josiah Buckner; Hannah Catron; Alexis Colbird; Justin Cregger; Addie Cyrus; Dakotah Dalton; Alex Davis; Kasey Davis; Tyler Dye; Andrea Graham; Audrey Henderson; Abigail Jenkins; Jada Knuckles; Nathan Lily; Sophia Lipscomb; Jakayla Mathews; Landon McCarty; Haylie McPherson; Ethan Nelson; the parish of Laurent; Kelsey Peak; Raegan Poole; Mary Powell; Martha Anne O. Roesell; Erica J. Sheppard; Logan S. Shilling; Katherine A. Smith; Logan Smith; Sophia Stanley; Aliyah Taylor; Avery Thompson; savannah walker; Jonathan Wellman; Emily Worley; Samvat Yadav

“A B” – Destiny Akers; Brianna Alley; Julia Bailey; Mason Bolton; Dean Brendlinger; Aaron Brooks; Ashton Burgess; Isabelle Burns; Joniya Burroughs; Reece Burton; Peyton Clemmons; Dylan Cline; Noah Conley; Gracie Finley; Adam Green; Cassandra Green; Jeannette Lester; Stephen Matthews; Jacob McClure; Tremayne McConnell; Jessie Meadows; Chase Moore; Kylee O’Dell; Lily Palmer; Karmellia Perkins; Rebecca Pruett; Skylur rice; Hope Riley; Kelsey A. Robinett; Brandon J. Sheppard; Michael Stapleton; Spencer Turner; Brycen Wall; Madison Walters; Michael Wanzer; Taylor Weeks; ivory wood; Emma Worker

11th grade:

“A” – Taryn Bailey; Kimberly Bane; Tori Basham; Sierra Blankenship; Destiny Bowles; Ellianah Burgess; Loren Burner; Camp Breanna; Natalia Carl; Emeli Cline; Kaden Cline; Abigail Coffey; Kylie Conner; Emma Furches; Ashanti Greene; Ciera Room; Mason Hatfield; Bradford Hurt; Hyder Meadow; Jacob Lambert; David Lewis; Ethan Lusk; Avery Malachowsky; John Meachum; Taylor Meade; Brooke Pinter; Lily Powell; Khamrin Proffitt; Brooklynn Reed; Maghan Roberts; Olivia Ross; Ayanna Sawyer; Isaac Shafer; Alyssa Sizemore; Reagan Southers; Autumn Sparks; Alexandria Thomas; Sara Tibbs

“A B” – Kaden Adams; Kristlynn Addison; Owen Bailey; Mason Brookman; Tori Buckner; Bryson Canterbury; Samantha Chericozzi; Cloita Chinsolo; Jackson Cline; Kalyn Davis; Mahala Finley; Melissa Foskett; Casey Geso; Addison Guill; Halie Gunnoe; Haley Guzardo; Brock Halsey; Jena Howell; Trixie Irenaeus; Alexander Kent; Gavin Kime; Consuelo Lopez; Madison Mcvey; Isabelle Mullens; Jacob Owens; Alan Pendleton; Kiara Porterfield; Madison Powers; Embroidered Rice; Andrew Rotenberry; Jocelyn Sanders; Treasure Saunders; Savanna sawyer; Caroline Shaffer; Hannah Smith; Stacy Stapleton; Abigail Vest; Jared Watson; Rosa Williams; Anissa Wimer

10th year:

“A” – Devin Adkins; Brandon Anderson; Ethan Cary; Sarah Cooper; Matthew counts; Daniel Creer; Michael Holiday; Abigail Jenkins; Savannah Knight; Peyton Pedigo; Brooke Posey; Reece Rhodes; Riley Riggs; Kenneth ‘Isaiah’ Skeens; Makira Taylor; Noah Thornhill; Madison Walker; Hannah Wingle

“A B” – Patrick Anderson; Ava Bane; Emily Booth; Camp Nicholas; Caleb Chapman; Hannah Clay; Blake Cocus; Jayda Cosby; Cadence Driscoll; East Lottie; Abigail Ganoe; Kayleigh Gonzin; Steven Howell; Heidi Score; Randall Manayao; Wyatt Meadows; Lyndzee Metz; Malia Powell; Chase Smith; Caleb Steele; Kaitlyn Steele; Gavin Stover; Madison Stul; Abigail Wood

9th grade:

“A” – Brandon Akers; Nicholas Bailey; Keyara Bugg; Caroletta Cardwell; Tristen Cline; Lea Croy; Richard Davis; Mason Dillon; Nathan Dinger; Jeremy Flanigan; Jesse Golden; Courtney Guzardo; Carley Hurt; Hailey Hylton; McKinley Leffel; Austin Lily; Kaitlyn Lowe; Marquel Lowe; Channing McRae; Logan McVey; Emma Morrison; Jaycee Pritchett; Kayla Robinson; Nadia Rowe; Makayla Salem; Addisyn J. Sarver; Wyatt Stanley; Ty Thompson; Paulene Tinio; Dakota Walters; James (Gene) Washington; Luck Watkins

“A B” – Charleigh Adkins; Drake Aliff; Adrian Anderson; Brooklyn Arrowood; Rory Bailey; Isaac Basil; Bethany Bayle; Brooke Bennett; Aaron Blankenship; Ayden Buckner; Bryce Burgess; Lilian Burns; Derek Caldwell; Erin Campbell; Kandon Christian; Holly Cole; Asia Collins; Nathan Craddock; Lexus Engan Wiler; Malachi Hall; Nathaniel Hambrick; Dewayne Hamm; Audriauna Hatcher; Savannah Hayes; Jaden Helmandollar; Emilie Hogate; A’Marvion Howard; Kaylee Hudson; Zackary Jenkins; Hayden Jones; Lucas Jones; Rileigh Kessler; Kaitlyn Lester; Isabelle McKinney; Aiden Miller; Zachary Neal; Omar Peavy; Samuel Pendergrass; Antionette Prewitt; Makenli Roberts; Don J. Rompon II; Hailey R. Shelton; Destiny L. Sims; Abigail G. Sparks; Richard Stowers; Michael Whittaker; Makaylee Wright

Local UC graduates

Concord University announces the following area students as candidates for graduation for the Spring 2022 semester:

MASTERS CANDIDATES FOR GRADUATION — WV

ATHENS: Lauren Nicole Bethel, Master of Arts in Health Promotion; Lauren Amanda Phillips, Master of Arts in Health Promotion

BLUEFIELD: Vanita Rachae Dowell, Master of Arts in Health Promotion; Justin Tyler Lightfoot, Master of Education; Jessica Marie McConnell, Master of Social Work; Amber Monroe, Masters of Social Work; Kristen Janelle Williams, Master of Social Work

CAMP CREEK: Lola Elizabeth McKinney, Masters of Social Work

GAP MILLS: Erica Jo Brownfield, Master of Social Work

LINDSIDE: Samantha McKinney, Masters of Social Work

MONTCALM: Destiny Nicole Clemins, Masters in Social Work

PETERSTOWN: Tanya Lynn Jewell, Masters of Education; Katherine Leigh Mann, Master of Education

PRINCETON: Tabitha Austin, Master of Education; Shyann Marie Carr, Master of Education; Heather Michelle Haynes, Master of Education; Matthew V. Thomas, Master of Education; Troy M. Walker, Master of Arts in Health Promotion; Jessica Whitt, Master of Social Work

ROCK: Loressa Mae Bouldin, Master of Education

SWITCHBACK: Aaron Wayne Fowler, Master of Education

UNION: Adam M. Neel, Master of Education

OUT OF STATE

BLUEFIELD, VIRGINIA: Jade Elaine Dixon, Masters of Social Work; Nathan Ray Lawson, Master of Education

CEDAR BLUFF, VIRGINIA: Shirley Wilson, Master of Social Work

NARROWS, VIRGINIA: Rachel Caitlin Riggs, Masters of Education; Denise Lynn Ward, Master of Education

NORTH TAZEWELL, VIRGINIA: Gabrielle Rene Cline, Master of Business Administration

PEARISBURG, VIRGINIA: Christopher Smallwood, Master of Social Work

UNDERGRADUATE GRADUATE CANDIDATES – WV

ALDERSON: Catherine Ruth Boyd, Regents Bachelor of Arts; Matthew Colin Harvey, Bachelor of Science in Education, Summa Cum Laude, Bachelor of Science, Summa Cum Laude; Skyler Nekole McCallister, Bachelor of Science, Summa Cum Laude, Bachelor of Social Work, Summa Cum Laude

ATHENS: Elizabeth Carey, Bachelor of Arts, Field Honors in Advertising/Graphic Design; Joseph Dart, Bachelor of Science in Education; Sydney L. Philpott, Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training, Cum Laude; Steven R. Pugh, Regents Bachelor of Arts; Phelicity Robinson, Bachelor of Arts

BERWIND: Kimberley Ann Click, BSc

BLUEFIELD: Joseph Ian Addison, Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude; Joseph D. Barton, BSc, Summa Cum Laude; Erin Carene Duffy, Bachelor of Arts, Magna Cum Laude; Colton Elliott Lively, BSc, Summa Cum Laude; Megan LouAnn McGraw, Bachelor of Arts, Summa Cum Laude, Bachelor of Arts, Summa Cum Laude; Ciara McKee, Bachelor of Social Work, Bachelor of Science; Mark Richard Shaffer, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration; Madison Nicole Shanklin, Bachelor of Science, Cum Laude; Kiersten Nichelle Thomason, Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude, Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude

LERONA: Tara James, Bachelor of Science in Education, Cum Laude; Hunter Mitchelson, Bachelor of Science, Magna Cum Laude

OAKVALE: William Johnston, Bachelor of Science in Education

PANTHER: Hunter Bailey, Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training, Magna Cum Laude

PETERSTOWN: Kiera Conner, BSc, Cum Laude; Christopher Dunn, BSc; Kelli Elizaveta Ellison, Bachelor of Science, Honors Sociology, Honors Criminology, Bachelor of Science; Haley Lawrence, BSc, Cum Laude; Chloe Martin King, Bachelor of Science in Education, Summa Cum Laude; Kaylin Shelton, BSc, Summa Cum Laude;

PRINCETON: Joycelina Nicole Baker, Regents Bachelor of Arts; Daniel C. Baldwin, BSc, Cum Laude; Abigail Billings, Bachelor of Science in Education, Cum Laude; Hallie Carr, Regents Bachelor of Arts; Katherine Elizabeth Curran, BSc, Cum Laude; Danielle Lorene Damewood, Bachelor of Social Work; Breanne N. Fields, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Summa Cum Laude; Madeline Kate Hawkins, Bachelor of Social Work, Summa Cum Laude; Delissa Jo Marie Haynes, BSc, Cum Laude; Austin Hazelwood, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration; Samantha Ann Hazelwood, BSc, Cum Laude; Alexis Jennings, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration; Brendon Jacob Jones, Bachelor of Science; Samantha B. Juba, Bachelor of Science in Education, Cum Laude; Kristin N. Kelly, BSW, Magna Cum Laude; Brittany Ann Long, Bachelor of Science, Major in Sociology, Major in Criminology; Cheyenne Loomis, Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude; Kaitlyn Elizabeth Matney, BSc, Magna Cum Laude; Michael McGrady, Bachelor of Social Work; Melissa Ann McKinney, Regents Bachelor of Arts; Emily Hannah Peck, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Cum Laude; Aubrie Shyann Peyton, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Cum Laude; Timmy Wayne Poe, Regents Bachelor of Arts; Shauntina Reed, Regents Bachelor of Arts; Brandon L. Roberts, Bachelor of Science; Jocelyn Paige Scott, BSc, Cum Laude; Bethany D. Sisk, Bachelor of Science; Robert Lee Snidow, III, BSc, Magna Cum Laude; Hannah Grace Stauffer, Bachelor of Science in Education, Summa Cum Laude; Mary Margaret Taylor, Regents Bachelor of Arts; Andrew Trimble, BSc; Andrea Dawn Webb, Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems; Zachary Evan White, Bachelor of Science in Education, Summa Cum Laude; Kameron Whittaker, Bachelor of Science in Education, Summa Cum Laude

ROCK: Elizabeth Virginia Elaine Martin, Regents Bachelor of Arts

SINKS GROVE: Lisa Gail Coburn, Bachelor of Science, Major in Communication Arts — Theater

SPANISH: Brittany Vaught, Bachelor of Science

OUT OF STATE

FALLS MILLS, VIRGINIA: Katherine Franklin, BSc, Cum Laude

NARROWS, VIRGINIA: Gavin Jackson Pruett, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Cum Laude

PEARISBURG, VIRGINIA: Noah Holland Clark, BSc, Magna Cum Laude;

Maggie Garris Guynn, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

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Penguins and squirrels have never been so violent in these games https://songhaizeng.com/penguins-and-squirrels-have-never-been-so-violent-in-these-games/ Wed, 18 May 2022 17:20:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/penguins-and-squirrels-have-never-been-so-violent-in-these-games/ Penguins aren’t the most skilled accomplices due to the fact that they don’t have hands, but they’ll more or less get the job done. In Biggest penguin heist of all time, you’ll assemble a motley crew of clumsy bird jesters to pull off heists. We’ve got penguins and more in Cool WIP, Polygon’s weekly roundup […]]]>

Penguins aren’t the most skilled accomplices due to the fact that they don’t have hands, but they’ll more or less get the job done. In Biggest penguin heist of all time, you’ll assemble a motley crew of clumsy bird jesters to pull off heists.

We’ve got penguins and more in Cool WIP, Polygon’s weekly roundup of eye-catching clips and work-in-progress screenshots. Every week, the Polygon team scours the internet for the most interesting games still under construction to give you a sampling of the most exciting projects.

This week we also have a squirrel wielding a gun, a game that appears to be made of wood, an epic kaiju fight, and a high-speed dune buggy.

These penguins will steal the greatest known penguin treasure (and then your heart)

In The biggest penguin heist of all time, a cast of clumsy penguins pull off big heists. The creator told Polygon via email that the game was inspired while playing Club Penguin and the Metal Gear Solid series. A excerpt posted on Twitter shows the birds handling explosives, and in this one, one of them picks up a barrel and accidentally smashes it, blowing everything up. You can find more information at penguin Flight on the game’s Steam page.

Feed this squirrel or suffer its wrath

Visual effects artist Dan DeEntremont posted a clip of an extremely realistic and violent squirrel. In the clip we see a super detailed squirrel with plush fur and all. It looks as close to the real thing as a 3D model could get, but then the squirrel picks up a gun and shoots the ground to propel itself through the air. It’s wild, it’s fun – and you can watch the clip and more of his work at his Twitter account.

The most beautiful wooden world

Yullia is a game developer working on Boiso. From what Yullia has shown of the game so far, it has an absolutely gorgeous 3D art style that makes the world look like it’s made of wood. The light pastel landscape shimmers with golden light, creating a beautiful and tranquil effect. A recent clip of the game shows a small bird with a bobbly head. This is a WIP that I will definitely be keeping an eye on. For more beautiful game developers like this, you can check out Yullia’s Twitter page.

Fight this kaiju in style

We’ve written about Wazen’s work before, and the developer shared an update on a game on Saturday. Wazen describes this WIP as a third-person game with anime-style action. In the past, we have seen combat demonstrations against abstract figures in unconstructed settings; however, here we see the fight taking place against a kaiju. In the clip, the hero rushes to protect a residential area and unleashes a chain of combo attacks against the monster. It’s an exciting project, and you can follow it on Wazen’s Twitter.

Take this dune buggy for a ride

Sean Dick is a game developer working on a little game where you drive a dune buggy through dangerous terrain. A clips watch the tiny toy-like car leaping across large chasms and blasting through targets while navigating. Dick has also worked on other runners in the past, so you can check out his previous work on Twitter.

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A new artist exhibited at the George Mackie Library https://songhaizeng.com/a-new-artist-exhibited-at-the-george-mackie-library/ Sat, 14 May 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/a-new-artist-exhibited-at-the-george-mackie-library/ Creating art has always been Yacoub’s delight. Visit the George Mackie Library in North Delta to see works by artist Eve-Lynn Yacoub, currently on display until the end of June. The exhibition features paintings made using acrylics and mixed media and hand-painted wooden panels made from barn boards and finished with beeswax. Creating art has […]]]>

Creating art has always been Yacoub’s delight.

Visit the George Mackie Library in North Delta to see works by artist Eve-Lynn Yacoub, currently on display until the end of June.

The exhibition features paintings made using acrylics and mixed media and hand-painted wooden panels made from barn boards and finished with beeswax.

Creating art has always been Yacoub’s delight. She graduated in Commercial Art & Design, specializing in Graphic Design in the UK in the 1970s.

Over the years, she has continued to create art from her home studio. Fervently passionate, she participates in local craft fairs, selling her creations by word of mouth.

“I discovered that creating art is a healing experience in difficult times,” she says. “Creating art allowed for the expression of emotions I needed to feel grounded. It brings joy and happiness – as bright colors and markings lift the spirit. I hope to bring light and joy to others who experience my work.

“As a mother and grandmother, now having more time to focus on my passions, I have rediscovered my creative inspirations to express my life experiences through art and color. I continue to discover my path creative and my style – exploring new directions, experimenting with different mediums to convey texture and color, and finding other ways to express a feeling, mood, memory, or moment in time. sunflower turning to light, it’s an exciting chapter filled with new possibilities.

For more information on Eve-Lynn Yacoub, please visit her Instagram page @EvelynnsArt22 or her website: www.etsy.com/ca/shop/EvelynnsArt22.

If you haven’t seen teenage artist Jacqueline Dunlop’s exhibition yet, don’t delay! His vibrant paintings in the teen space of the library are on view until May 20.

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Actor John Turturro P’23 shares film clips with film students https://songhaizeng.com/actor-john-turturro-p23-shares-film-clips-with-film-students/ Fri, 13 May 2022 09:05:20 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/actor-john-turturro-p23-shares-film-clips-with-film-students/ John Turturro chose six film clips to share with students Award-winning actor John Turturro P’23 joined the class one afternoon in April to talk about acting and filmmaking techniques. Turturro has appeared in over sixty films, alongside names such as Robert Redford, Adam Sandler, Robin Williams and Robert De Niro. He has worked many times […]]]>

John Turturro chose six film clips to share with students

Award-winning actor John Turturro P’23 joined the class one afternoon in April to talk about acting and filmmaking techniques.

Turturro has appeared in over sixty films, alongside names such as Robert Redford, Adam Sandler, Robin Williams and Robert De Niro. He has worked many times with legendary directors like Spike Lee and the Coen Brothers and is known for his contributions to the independent film movement. Turturro, however, can also be regularly seen in Hollywood blockbuster films such as Transformers franchise and, more recently, The Batman.

The actor selected scenes from a number of films, made between the 1930s and 1970s, to talk about with the class, with each clip illustrating the on-screen chemistry between the leading couples.:

In The Lady Eve (1941), a wacky comedy directed by Preston Sturges, the class watched Barbara Stanwyk’s trickster turn her seductive charms into the unsuspecting Henry Fonda, who plays the naive heir to a brewery fortune. “In this scene, she seduces him in a way that he doesn’t know,” Turturro said, “which makes for a great scene.”

Like many artists of that era, he explained, Stanwyk was a great actor. “In older movies, everyone was developing a walk because there weren’t all these close-ups.” For example, consider James Cagney, Bette Davis or John Wayne.

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Mosaic Artist’s Artwork, APS Students Bloom at Summit Courthouse https://songhaizeng.com/mosaic-artists-artwork-aps-students-bloom-at-summit-courthouse/ Wed, 11 May 2022 10:01:11 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/mosaic-artists-artwork-aps-students-bloom-at-summit-courthouse/ The end of a first floor hallway that was once dark and nondescript in the first floor annex of the Summit County Courthouse is now dominated by luminous beauty with the new light mosaic “The New Dawn Blooms”. It is thanks to Bath artist Bonnie Cohen, who was commissioned by Summit County Probate Court Judge […]]]>

The end of a first floor hallway that was once dark and nondescript in the first floor annex of the Summit County Courthouse is now dominated by luminous beauty with the new light mosaic “The New Dawn Blooms”.

It is thanks to Bath artist Bonnie Cohen, who was commissioned by Summit County Probate Court Judge Elinore Marsh Stormer to create artwork to inspire and ease the stress of Palace staff and visitors. historic downtown Akron justice.

Cohen’s design features a rare large trillium – Ohio’s state wildflower that blooms only briefly in early spring. Cohen strived for a light, airy and ethereal design.

“This trill is going to shine like it’s in the forest and I hope it brings peace to the people here,” Judge Stormer said in mid-April at the courthouse.

Akron students collaborate on courtyard mosaic

The artist’s mosaic project reached even further into the community, with Cohen collaborating with high school art students from Akron Public Schools to create individual tiles to incorporate into the artwork.

“Each one is so, so unique and it just adds that richness and depth and feeling,” Cohen said of the student tiles on Tuesday as she and more than 60 APS students and teachers meet. are met at the courthouse for the first time to enjoy the fruits of their labor.

Students were thrilled to find their own tiles in the large 5ft by 14ft work, zooming in with their cellphones to capture them.

“It was amazing. Like it gave me chills when I first saw it,” said North junior Lauren Curtis, 17, who was smitten with the colors of the mosaic.

North High School art student Lauren Curtis listens to artist Iselin as he talks about his work on display at the Summit County Courthouse on Tuesday.

Prior to Tuesday, the students and Cohen had been unable to interact live due to the pandemic. The artist made short technical demonstration videos, created with the help of APS Advisor Karen Stepic, to teach students from Firestone, North and Buchtel the techniques of sculpting and stamping pottery art from the Ohio around the same time the courthouse was built – 1908.

Cohen’s goal was to impart a sense of history to students so that they had a starting point for the style of the time. Each student’s handmade tile design was inspired by the leaves, flowers and buds of the trillium.

“Without ever having met you, we ended up doing something beautiful together,” Cohen told students on Tuesday.

North High School art students Shristhi Pulami, left, and Santa Chhetri view a sculpture on display at the Summit County Courthouse on Tuesday.

Cohen used approximately 100 4×4-inch tiles made from Ohio clay by North and Firestone students to form the border of the mosaic. They were led by art teachers Steve Beltrondo at North and Michael Sienerth at Firestone.

Cohen, 68, chose student tile placement and glazed lots of tile repeatedly to flow with his trillium and sunburst design.

“Something beautiful came out of those plain white tiles when it all came together,” Cohen said.

Andra Beninghoff, 18, a senior from Firestone, was delighted to see the mosaic completed.

“I couldn’t see how it was going to fight together, especially since we all had a different design,” she said. “It’s really impressive for me to see what you can do with clay and mosaic like that.”

Buchtel High School art students made tiles for a coordinated piece in the Grand Jury lobby of the courthouse.

Coordination piece by students in the lobby

Handcrafted colorful tiles by Buchtel CLC students, led by teacher Annette Economus, were framed in a coordinating piece featured in the lower-level Grand Jury lobby.

“Looks good,” junior Javeion Littlepage said of Buchtel’s piece, identifying his green and yellow flower tile. “I’m really new to ceramics.”

On Tuesday, the students chatted with Cohen during “The New Dawn Blooms” installation, viewed works by other artists throughout the courthouse, then went to the ceremonial courtyard for a chat with the artist. Cohen is an Akron-born 1971 Firestone graduate who said she was particularly influenced by high school art teacher Dennis Chasek.

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Pamplin grad designs her future one chart at a time – Jagwire https://songhaizeng.com/pamplin-grad-designs-her-future-one-chart-at-a-time-jagwire/ Mon, 09 May 2022 18:00:50 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/pamplin-grad-designs-her-future-one-chart-at-a-time-jagwire/ As Augusta University prepares to celebrate the first 2022 graduates in the spring, graphic design student Ashley Sanchez prepares for the next chapter as she eagerly waits to cross the stage. Sanchez is originally from Augusta and his parents met when they were students on campus. “My parents met at this university – in Washington […]]]>

As Augusta University prepares to celebrate the first 2022 graduates in the spring, graphic design student Ashley Sanchez prepares for the next chapter as she eagerly waits to cross the stage.

Sanchez is originally from Augusta and his parents met when they were students on campus.

“My parents met at this university – in Washington Hall – when it was the student center. When one of the upstairs rooms was turned into a paint studio, I thought, ‘Oh wow! My parents met in this room, in this building and I am in class here!

Although she was initially interested in health care, she was encouraged by her parents to apply to Augusta University and experience all it had to offer. She felt she was following in their footsteps by choosing to attend UA. After some time on campus, she decided to switch to the art program and will earn a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Pamplin College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences.

“I am an artist through and through. Ever since I was a young child I was into creativity – into drawing, coloring and writing stories,” Sanchez said. “When I finally joined the art program, I wondered why I hadn’t done it sooner. This program is for me. It was fate. I loved taking art classes and being a student in this program.

Early in her senior year, she was introduced to Ghazal Foroutan, a new assistant professor in graphic design. She mentioned how her experience has been enriched by learning from a new mentor.

“She is a recent graduate and was familiar with recent trends on social media and creating digital portfolios. And she taught us how to participate in competitions and make ourselves known. She was a very good mentor. »

She also noted how helpful the university’s career services were, as well as the ability to do her job on campus, even after hours.

“Good work sometimes takes time, and I learned a lot in this class,” she said. “But being able to access the studio after hours so you can spend time getting the job done has been invaluable to me.”

While on campus, she became the creator of The Phoenix, the magazine produced by the university’s students. With that experience, Sanchez feels confident in the skills and relationships she has built over the years to step onto the pitch.

“I feel prepared in terms of skills and I try to make my work speak for itself or speak for me. I also learn outside of class. Going forward I have to learn on my own and I think they gave me a great base to build on,” she said.

woman smiling for the photo
Ashley Sanchez is ready for graduation. [Michael Holahan/Augusta University]

As she prepares for her next chapter, she looks for opportunities to design packaging for products.

“I’m very interested in packaging design. I think that’s what solidified my interest in graphic design by seeing howpallets, packaging and sheets. They are so pretty. I want to be able to do that too,” she said.

She strongly encourages future seniors to get involved on campus as well as to get more involved in the field of graphic design.

“Take the time to really learn the design programs and software to get familiar with it. Reinforce these skills and critique your own work. And to get better, take the time to do research and create mood boards to inspire yourself from other designers.

Augusta University’s Spring 2022 Launch Ceremonies will take place on Thursday, May 12 and Friday, May 13. Thursday’s ceremony will honor graduate students and Friday’s ceremonies will honor undergraduate students. Watch live events.

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Peter Moore, creator of Air Jordan sneakers, dies at 78 https://songhaizeng.com/peter-moore-creator-of-air-jordan-sneakers-dies-at-78/ Sun, 08 May 2022 00:47:47 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/peter-moore-creator-of-air-jordan-sneakers-dies-at-78/ Placeholder while loading article actions Peter Moore, who designed the first Air Jordan basketball shoe in 1985 and whose “Jumpman” logo helped propel the Jordan brand of athletic footwear and apparel into a multi-billion dollar industry, died on April 29. in Portland, Oregon. He was 78 years old. His death was announced by officials from […]]]>
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Peter Moore, who designed the first Air Jordan basketball shoe in 1985 and whose “Jumpman” logo helped propel the Jordan brand of athletic footwear and apparel into a multi-billion dollar industry, died on April 29. in Portland, Oregon. He was 78 years old.

His death was announced by officials from Nike and Adidas, two companies for which he worked as creative director. He had Parkinson’s disease.

Mr. Moore operated a design studio in Portland in the late 1970s and had Nike, then a fledgling shoe company in Beaverton, Oregon, as a client. Six years later, he joined Nike as the brand’s first “creative director”.

He and another Nike executive, Rob Strasser, saw the marketability of basketball and in 1984 were instrumental in signing Michael Jordan, then starting his career with the Chicago Bulls, to a contract at long term with Nike.

Several people have taken credit for bringing Jordan into the business, but Mr. Moore and Strasser are the ones who devised a marketing strategy based around designing a pair of shoes specifically for the budding basketball star. . The idea of ​​a “signature shoe” was considered revolutionary.

The original Air Jordans (known to aficionados as the Air Jordan 1) contained an air pocket in the sole and were made of soft leather in the Bulls colors of red, black and white. They went on sale in April 1985 for $65, before Jordan wore them in a game.

“I was designing the shoe with the idea that I needed a real basketball shoe that the best basketball player in the world could play in,” Mr. Moore told slamonline.com in 2018. “But I I also needed something that would be unique, never seen before.”

At the time, the NBA required players’ shoes to be solid white or black (or, in the case of the Boston Celtics, green). After Jordan debuted his new multicolored shoes at an exhibition game in October 1985, they were banned by the NBA. Nike quickly ran an advertisement about the incident and young people camped in the streets to buy the new Air Jordans, which represented style, athletic grace and rebellion all at once.

“There’s no doubt that the fact that the shoes were banned helped sell the shoes,” Moore said in a documentary about the Air Jordans. “Kids like that stuff… ‘I’m wearing something I’m not supposed to wear.’ Perfect. Couldn’t be better.

Nike sent NBA commissioner David Stern a letter thanking him for the free marketing campaign, and the league quickly changed its rules. Shoe store chain Footlocker increased its order from around 5,000 pairs to 100,000, and within a year Nike had sold over a million pairs of Air Jordans.

As Jordan grew into one of the NBA’s preeminent stars, there was a certain mystique to everything about him, especially the shoes. Every year, Nike introduced a new design for the Air Jordan, incorporating lightweight materials and other features, and young people around the world flocked to buy them. Nike ran advertisements calling them “anti-gravity devices” and began using the catchy slogans “Wing It” and “Just Do It”.

The Air Jordan campaign also marked one of the first times a player in a team sport was marketed for their individual appeal.

“It seems so simple, so obvious,” Moore told slamonline.com. “But at the time, it honestly broke every operating rule of our industry. No one had taken a player, created shoes and apparel related to their style, and then thrown it all together once.

In 1987, Mr. Moore changed the Air Jordan logo from a basketball centered between a pair of wings to a silhouette of Jordan flying through the air with a basketball in his hand, arms and legs outstretched.

The “Jumpman” logo – based on a photograph for Life magazine – appears on all of Nike’s Jordan-branded products, from shoes to apparel to athletic gear. In 2021, the Jordan brand accounted for more than 10% of Nike’s annual revenue of $44.5 billion.

At Nike, Moore developed other marketing ideas, including posters featuring athletes including Jordan, basketball player Moses Malone and tennis star John McEnroe. They became so popular that some athletes demanded display clauses in their endorsement contracts with Nike.

In 1987, Mr. Moore and Strasser left Nike to start a sports marketing company, and soon they were consultants for Adidas, the venerable German sports shoe manufacturer. The two men then joined the company.

Mr. Moore, who became Adidas’ creative director and, for two years, its chairman, redesigned the company’s logo, turning its familiar three-stripe mark into a new mountain-like symbol. He and Strasser, who died in 1993, refocused Adidas on its history, which dates back to the 1920s, when its founder, Adi Dassler, became the first major designer of high-performance athletic shoes.

“The model was to go back to what Dassler had tried to do his whole life,” Mr Moore told business magazine Strategy+Business in 2015, “which was to make the best products for the athlete to compete in.”

Mr. Moore was also largely responsible for creating the Adidas Equipment (sometimes referred to as EQT) line of performance gear and apparel. He also tapped into the company’s past by launching a successful line of retro-themed items called Adidas Originals. The company’s fortunes reversed and Adidas is now one of Nike’s main international competitors.

Peter Colin Moore was born on February 21, 1944 in Cleveland. Her father was a naval officer and her mother a housewife.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in graphic design in 1969 from the Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles (now part of CalArts). He worked in a California design studio before moving to Portland in the early 1970s.

He retired from Adidas in 1998 to focus on painting.

Survivors include his wife, the former Christine Hummel; three sons; a sister; a brother; and four granddaughters.

Last month, Ben Affleck and Matt Damon announced plans to write, direct and star in a film about how Jordan and Nike came together to form a sports marketing juggernaut.

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Movies in North Texas theaters May 6th and soon https://songhaizeng.com/movies-in-north-texas-theaters-may-6th-and-soon/ Fri, 06 May 2022 10:02:40 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/movies-in-north-texas-theaters-may-6th-and-soon/ NEW THIS WEEK Letternotes are only listed when a revision is available. (B) DOCTOR STRANGE IN THE MULTIVERSE OF MADNESS There’s plenty of witchcraft and evil twins in this spooky and unhinged new Marvel film from director Sam Raimi. It begins with a giant octopus attack and spreads its narrative tentacles from there, drawing us […]]]>

NEW THIS WEEK

Letternotes are only listed when a revision is available.

(B) DOCTOR STRANGE IN THE MULTIVERSE OF MADNESS There’s plenty of witchcraft and evil twins in this spooky and unhinged new Marvel film from director Sam Raimi. It begins with a giant octopus attack and spreads its narrative tentacles from there, drawing us into an alternately awkward and macabre story that occasionally pauses to unleash a tidal wave of grief. Benedict Cumberbatch is superb as Dr. Stephen Strange. Also starring Rachel McAdams and Elizabeth Olsen. PG-13 (for intense sequences of violence and action, scary images and some language). 126 mins. In wide version.

LITTLE WIZARD In this animated movie, a prince finds himself trapped in the body of a mouse and a group of friends embark on a quest to turn him back into a human. Unclassified. 86 mins. At Galaxy Theaters Grandscape at The Colony.

THE RAVINE A horrific crime rocks a peaceful community, leaving family and friends wondering if they’ve noticed a murderer among them or if there could be more to the story. With Eric Dane, Teri Polo, Peter Facinelli and Leslie Uggams. R (for a bit of violence and language). 121 mins. Available on VOD platforms.

SUICIDE FOR BEGINNERS In this comedy-horror, an insecure man (Wil Daniels) is determined to murder his unrequited love (Sara Tomko), but his clumsiness and incompetence instead set him on the path to becoming a serial killer. . Unclassified. 94 mins. At America Cinemas La Gran Plaza in Fort Worth.

COMING NEXT WEEK

FAMILY CAMP In the feature debut of Christian comedy duo The Skit Guys (Tommy Woodard and Eddie James), a trip to a family camp brings out the competitive side of two dads. PG (for certain actions and thematic elements). 111 mins.

FIRE STARTER A young girl (Ryan Kiera Armstrong) struggles to control her mysterious ability to set things on fire with her mind in this film based on Stephen King’s novel of the same name. Also starring Zac Efron, Gloria Reuben and Kurtwood Smith. R (for violent content). 110 mins.

EVENT A young woman seeks an illegal abortion in 1960s France in this adaptation of Annie Ernaux’s novel. R (for disturbing material/images, sexual content and graphic nudity). 100 mins. In French, with subtitles.

THE LAST VICTIM A sheriff (Ron Perlman) pursues a gang of outlaws in this modern-day western thriller. Unclassified. 103 mins.

ON THE COUNT OF THREE In this dark comedy, two best friends (Jerrod Carmichael and Christopher Abbott) make a suicide pact. Also starring Tiffany Haddish and JB Smoove. R (for violence, suicide, pervasive language and some sexual references). 86 mins.

REVENGE After his daughter is brutally murdered, a man (Clive Standen) sets out for revenge and finds himself in a war with a street gang. Also starring Bruce Willis, Thomas Jane, Theo Rossi and Mike Tyson. R (for violence, pervasive language and some sexual/nudity content). 96 mins.

CURRENT RELEASES

(VS) AMBULANCE After a heist goes awry, two bank robbers (Jake Gyllenhaal and Yahya Abdul-Mateen II) take hostages and rob an ambulance in an attempt to escape in director Michael Bay’s return to a time when thrillers of action were big, loud, decadent and ripped off since die hard. It maintains such a frenetic pace from start to finish that it ultimately feels exhausting. Also starring Eiza González. R (for bloody images, pervasive language and intense violence). 136 mins.

(B) THE VILLAINS In this fun animated tale that riffs on Ocean’s Eleven, a gang of criminal animals decide to become model citizens. The moral of the story doesn’t pack a big punch. Still, it’s smart, visually interesting and very, very funny. With the voices of Sam Rockwell, Awkwafina, Craig Robinson, Zazie Beetz, Marc Maron and Anthony Ramos. PG (for action and crude humor). 100 mins.

(A-) THE BATMAN Robert Pattinson dons the iconic cowl in this brooding superhero tale that brings some much-needed soul-searching to the Dark Knight. Also starring Zoë Kravitz, Paul Dano, Jeffrey Wright, John Turturro and Peter Sarsgaard. PG-13 (for strong violent and disturbing content, drug-related content, coarse language and some suggestive material). 176 mins.

(A) THE DUKE In this real-life tale, a taxi driver (Jim Broadbent) steals a portrait from London’s National Gallery and demands better care for the elderly in exchange for its return. This lively and engaging film also stars a terrific Helen Mirren as his long-suffering wife. R (for language and brief sexuality). 96 mins.

(A-) EVERYWHERE AT THE SAME TIME In this crazy sci-fi adventure comedy, a Chinese immigrant (Michelle Yeoh) struggles with an IRS tax audit while being drawn into a violent multiverse showdown. It is an absurd and tasteless ode to the messy and absurd struggle and happiness of being human. R (for language, some violent and sexual content). 139 mins. In English, Mandarin and Cantonese, with subtitles.

(VS-) FANTASTIC BEASTS: SECRETS OF DUMBLEDORE Magizoologist Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne) leads a team of wizards, witches and a brave Muggle on a mission to thwart an evil wizard (Mads Mikkelsen) in the third installment of the JK Rowling series. The film is less cluttered with distracting details than its immediate predecessor, but even a more polished plot can’t keep the over two hour film from feeling like an endurance test. Also starring Jude Law. PG-13 (for fantasy action and violence). 142 mins.

(VS) FATHER STU Mark Wahlberg stars in this religious drama about boxer-turned-priest Stuart Long. With his familiar rapid-fire style, Wahlberg can be entertaining. But the film is rarely truly engaging, and the no-show scriptwriting approach makes the characters two-dimensional and hollow. Also starring Jacki Weaver and Mel Gibson. R (for language). 124 mins.

(B) BIRD OF FIRE In this drama based on a true story, a young soldier (Tom Prior) and a fighter pilot (Oleg Zagorodnii) come to the attention of the KGB after they embark on a secret affair at a Soviet air base. The shiny, sleek 1970s melodrama soars with passion and is enhanced by strong production values, heartfelt performances, and a story arc that travels to unexpected destinations. R (for language and some sexual content). 107 mins.

(B) HATCHING In this imaginative Finnish horror fairy tale, a young gymnast (Siiri Solalinna) hatches a murderous monster from an egg she secretly nests in her bed, and that’s not even the scariest part – her perfectionist mother (Sophia Heikkilä) strikes the truest terror in the film. Like many great monster movies, Hatching uses a monster as a metaphor for pent-up emotion, and the creature at the center of this film is one of the most grotesque creations seen on screen in a long time. Unclassified. 86 mins. In Finnish, with subtitles.

JUJUTSU KAISEN 0: THE MOVIE In this animated tale from Japan, a teenager gains supernatural powers and enrolls in a special school to help him train. PG-13 (for certain suggestive references, language, gory images, thematic material and violent content). 105 mins. In Japanese, with subtitles.

(B) THE LOST CITY After a reclusive romance novelist (Sandra Bullock) is kidnapped, her cover model (Channing Tatum) sets out to rescue her. This jungle adventure isn’t just an entertaining adventure; it’s a return to rom-com form for one of the genre’s best and brightest stars. Bullock still has it, and she won’t let you forget it anytime soon. PG-13 (for violence and some bloody images, suggestive material, partial nudity and language). 112 mins.

(D+) MEMORY An assassin (Liam Neeson) learns he’s become a target after refusing to complete a job for a crime syndicate, but his failing memory gets in the way of his quest for revenge in this forgettable action thriller that’s plagued by bad luck. storyline and flat characters. R (for violence, some bloody images and language throughout). 114 mins. In English and Spanish, with subtitles.

MORBIUS In this Marvel superhero movie, a biochemist (Jared Leto) with a rare blood disease attempts a dangerous cure but instead infects himself with a form of vampirism. Also starring Matt Smith, Michael Keaton, Adria Arjona and Tyrese Gibson. PG-13 (for intense sequences of violence, some scary images and brief coarse language). 104 mins.

(A-) THE NORTHERN MAN Director Robert Eggers brings the Viking epic back to the big screen in a big, bold and gory way with this daringly bonkers epic starring Swedish actor Alexander Skarsgård. R (for strong bloody violence, some sexual content and nudity). 136 mins.

(A) LITTLE MOM In this sublime French exploration of friendship and mother-daughter relationships, an 8-year-old girl accompanies her parents to clean the house of her recently deceased grandmother and forms a bond with a young neighbor who looks suspiciously like her. PG (for some thematic elements and brief smoking). 72 mins. In French, with subtitles.

(VS-) SONIC THE HEDGEHOG 2 The Blue Hedgehog faces off against the evil Dr. Robotnik in this animated sequel based on the popular video game franchise. The overlong film wears down its reception long before it turns into another phone franchise entry. With the voices of Ben Schwartz, James Marsden, Jim Carrey and Idris Elba. PG (for some violence, action, crude humor and soft language). 122 mins.

(A-) SPIDER-MAN: NO WAY HOME Spider-Man (Tom Holland) has his secret identity revealed and turns to Dr. Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) for help in the latest entry in the Marvel superhero franchise. For a movie full of fan service and nostalgia — from little Easter eggs to crowd-pleasing cameos — No coming home also has a strong heart and feels like a satisfying conclusion to this arc in Peter Parker’s life. PG-13 (for certain language, action/violence sequences and brief suggestive comments). 148 mins.

(B+) THE UNPORTABLE WEIGHT OF MASSIVE TALENT Nicolas Cage embodies Nicolas Cage, a vain person to whom you get used to in a few seconds in this comedy which has fun in delirium to make fun of the actor. The film is equal parts slightly absurd buddy flick, straight-faced crime thriller, and hall of mirrors in which Cage’s life turns into a movie, and then back again. R (for violence, drug use, some sexual references and language throughout). 106 mins.

(VS) UNEXPLORED A clever thief (Tom Holland) is recruited to recover Ferdinand Magellan’s lost fortune in this film based on the popular video game series. This adventure movie is fine and entertaining enough, but while some moments are inspired, others are completely inert. PG-13 (for violence/action and language). 116 mins.

Compiled from staff reports and threads

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