Graphic Art – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ Fri, 11 Jun 2021 21:20:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://songhaizeng.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-138x136.png Graphic Art – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ 32 32 Maryland Athletics Wins Multiple National NACMA Awards https://songhaizeng.com/maryland-athletics-wins-multiple-national-nacma-awards/ https://songhaizeng.com/maryland-athletics-wins-multiple-national-nacma-awards/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 20:55:11 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/maryland-athletics-wins-multiple-national-nacma-awards/ History links COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The University of Maryland Athletics has won several national honors from the National Association of Collegiate Marketing Administrators (NACMA), the organization said Thursday. Maryland was named one of two finalists, with Ole Miss for the National Marketing Team of the Year as Texas won the first honor. The Terrapins […]]]>


COLLEGE PARK, Md. The University of Maryland Athletics has won several national honors from the National Association of Collegiate Marketing Administrators (NACMA), the organization said Thursday.

Maryland was named one of two finalists, with Ole Miss for the National Marketing Team of the Year as Texas won the first honor. The Terrapins were named Marketing Team of the Year in 2020 and 2015 to become the second school to win the National Marketing Championship on two separate occasions.

“I am incredibly proud of the efforts of our team over the past year, despite the challenges, and I am grateful that NACMA has chosen to recognize these efforts,” said Assistant Sporting Director of Marketing Strategy and Fan Experience Jordan Looby. “Our marketing team is fortunate to be surrounded by an incredible group of colleagues, all of whom are essential in making such things possible. This honor is theirs as well as ours.”

Finalist accolades from Maryland’s entry focused on its cutting-edge social media graphics; his campaign for racial justice; the launch of Terrapin Club +, an online streaming platform for Terrapin Club members; and the VoTERP campaign to raise awareness about voting in the elections last November.

Maryland took gold in the Single Play Campaign category and took a Bronze for Student Virtual or Onsite Promotion for College GameDay festivities in the men’s basketball game against Michigan State on February 29, 2020.

The show featured a breathtaking choreographed light show to the song “Mayhem” and it was just that: absolute mayhem. The next segment featured one of our most beloved Terp albums, Scott Van Pelt, leading the charge of our famous Maryland Flag Drop that was rolling off the wall. For the next segment, Maryland invited FLY, the performers of the popular song “Swag Surfin ‘” to court to lead fans in the Swag Surfin’ dance. Their performance got all the fans dancing from their seats.

The day was hailed by the biggest names in ESPN: “It’s one of the best environments we’ve ever had. It’s fantastic,” said Jay Bilas. “When you have an opening like we had with the light show, it’s unreal,” LaPhonso Ellis said.

Maryland won bronze in the Multiplatform Branding Campaign category for its racial justice campaign. The goal of the Racial Justice Campaign was to use the Maryland Athletics platform to center the fight for racial justice nationally, in the region, and within the University of Maryland community. Our goal was to make the voices of those involved in this fight heard and to raise awareness of the need for progress.

Maryland’s Marketing Strategy and Fan Experience Department is led by Looby, and also included
Kassidy Brown, Jacob Nicely, Rachel Palmer and Tori Gray as well as graphic design, social media and creative team members Jake Rose and Andrew Wray. Maryland’s Strategic Communications and Media Relations Unit is headed by Jason yellin with team members Dustin Semonavic, Sean Ellenby, Rose DiPaula, Taylor smith, Patrick fischer, Ben kessler, Keith sneddon, Hunter Dortenzo, Madison Kyler and Joanna levantis. The broadcast and production team is led by Mike Farrell and included Josh clayton, Tony Price, Jarred belman, Haley Timple, Alex Gros, Thomas mason, Jonas Haas and John bartman.



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‘Bo didn’t keep me safe’ https://songhaizeng.com/bo-didnt-keep-me-safe/ https://songhaizeng.com/bo-didnt-keep-me-safe/#respond Thu, 10 Jun 2021 23:38:25 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/bo-didnt-keep-me-safe/ Novi – University of Michigan football coach Bo Schembechler is often referred to as a legend. He led the Wolverines to 17 bowl games, received the Big Ten Coach of the Year award four times, and is considered one of the best college football coaches in history. To honor his legacy, UM erected a statue […]]]>


Novi – University of Michigan football coach Bo Schembechler is often referred to as a legend. He led the Wolverines to 17 bowl games, received the Big Ten Coach of the Year award four times, and is considered one of the best college football coaches in history.

To honor his legacy, UM erected a statue of him in front of the campus building known as Schembechler Hall.

But a dark shadow fell on his reputation on Thursday when Schembechler’s son and two former players claimed the coach knew they had been sexually assaulted by Dr Robert Anderson, but did nothing to stop him.

“I’m going to use one of Bo’s quotes, ‘You bought it and paid for it, you’re going to live with it,” said Matt Schembechler, one of the coach’s four sons. “What other people think he’s going to have to live in his grave with.”

Schembechler joined former Wolverine soccer players Daniel Kwiatkowski and Gilvanni Johnson at a press conference at the Sheraton Detroit Novi. All three said they were assaulted by Anderson and alerted the revered coach to no avail.

As a result, they said, hundreds more were said to have experienced genital touching, digital penetration and other abuse at the hands of Anderson, who worked at UM from 1966 to 2003, including as a sports team doctor and head of the university health service.

Each spoke of being assaulted by Anderson during the physical exams they needed to play sports, and then told Schembechler about it.

“Bo didn’t keep me safe,” said Kwiatkowski, a 1977-1919 MU attacking tackle who alleged Anderson first assaulted him during a mandatory physical exam early on. of its first year.

(Editor’s Note: This video contains graphical language and may not be suitable for all viewers.)

to play

Former Michigan football player Daniel Kwiatkowski on Dr. Anderson

Former Michigan football player Daniel Kwiatkowski on Dr. Anderson. Note: This video contains graphical language and may not be suitable for all viewers.

Detroit News

When he told Schembechler, the coach told him to “get tough,” Kwiatkowski said.

“I graduated and left UM, but the scars of what happened to me by Dr Anderson and Bo never left,” he said.

Johnson, a MU wide receiver from 1982 to 1986 and a Detroit Lions player in 1987, said he had been sexually assaulted by Anderson more than 15 times and told Schembechler after the second occurrence.

“If Bo had arrested Dr Anderson after the first exam in my freshman year, the rest of the assaults would never have happened,” Johnson said. “If Bo had stopped Dr Anderson before 1982, I wouldn’t have been a victim at all.”

Anderson’s legacy was celebrated after his death in 2008. But in a February 2020 article in The Detroit News, Robert Julian Stone accused Anderson of sexually assaulting him in 1971. His story has since revealed 850 accusers. , who are in mediation with UM.

Schembechler, who coached the MU football team from 1969 to 1989, died in 2006.

In a joint statement Thursday, UM President Mark Schlissel and the board responded to the latest allegations.

“Our sympathy for all of Anderson’s victims is deep and unwavering, and we thank them for their courage in coming forward,” the statement said. “We condemn and apologize for the tragic misconduct of the late Dr. Robert Anderson, who left the University 17 years ago and passed away 13 years ago.

Rebekah Modrak, UM professor at the School of Art & Design, said the latest revelations were yet further evidence of the university’s failure to adequately respond to sexual misconduct.

“In 2017, University of Michigan administrators placed an accused serial sex offender – Martin Philbert – as a marshal, overseeing (the Office of Institutional Fairness),” she said. “And there was no impact on anyone on this hiring committee.

“I predict that the revelations of Dr. Robert Anderson’s horrific abuse will be dismissed as a problem of the past and, again, there will be no accountability,” Modrak said. “The culture of the University of Michigan is still unable to recognize flaws in order to do justice and prevent future violations.”

Reached Thursday by phone, Glenn “Shemy” Shembechler, the youngest son of Bo Schembechler, declined to comment.

But he told ESPN he doesn’t believe Matt, who is his brother. He said he couldn’t speak to the accusations of the other players.

“None of us were in this room when these players were talking to Bo,” Glenn Schembechler told ESPN. “The Bo I knew would have taken care of it and found another doctor. It would be that easy.”

He added that there was “no chance” that his father would hit his brother and did not see any violent behavior at home. His father, he said, was “as in love with a person as you can imagine” and is said to have stopped the assaults on Anderson.

Matt Schembechler, 62, said Anderson abused him twice, first in 1969 when he was 10 years old. He told his mother about it and then his father, who got angry, hit him and said he didn’t want to hear about it, the coach’s son said. His mother appealed to former UM athletic director Don Canham, who Matt Schembechler said fired the doctor, only for the coach to step in to keep him.

Schembechler said he was stepping forward to heal and adding his voice to the chorus of other people talking about Anderson, along with his father’s response.

“I understand the respect people have for my father,” Schembechler said, “but I know the truth: Anderson abused me and countless others for three decades… I had hoped my father would protect me, but he did not do it.”

Schembechler had a strained relationship with his father. He left the house where he grew up at the age of 18.

In 1999, he sued his father, the university and 12 other defendants, accusing them of trying to ruin his sports memorabilia business and damaging his reputation.

Bo Schembechler’s confidence specifically left out Matthew Schembechler and his two brothers who were adopted by the coach when he married Millie Schembechler in 1968, according to documents filed in federal court.

to play

Former Michigan football player Gilvanni Johnson on Dr Anderson and Bo Schembechler

Former Michigan football player Gilvanni Johnson on Dr Anderso and Bo Schembechler

Detroit News

He, along with Kwiatkowski, Johnson and their lawyers, said Anderson’s abuse was common knowledge in the football program.

“Bo knew. Everyone knew,” Kwiatkowski said.

Johnson said the players joked about “Dr Anus”.

Schembechler said: “Anderson’s abuse of players and students for 30 years was the college’s worst-kept secret.”

Mick Grewal, the lawyer for the three, said they “are now showing up to set the record straight.”

When asked how people should remember Bo Schembechler now, Johnson said it was more than his place as the Wolverines’ most victorious coach.

“Don’t get me wrong, Bo was a good coach,” Johnson said. “But, to me, in my memory of him at this point, did he allow 17 or 18 year olds to continue being assaulted when he could have done something about it.”

kkozlowski@detroitnews.com



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Keith Haring’s computer fantasy in 1984 to tempt technicians https://songhaizeng.com/keith-harings-computer-fantasy-in-1984-to-tempt-technicians/ https://songhaizeng.com/keith-harings-computer-fantasy-in-1984-to-tempt-technicians/#respond Thu, 10 Jun 2021 04:00:43 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/keith-harings-computer-fantasy-in-1984-to-tempt-technicians/ Christie’s will sell an early computer painting, made in 1984 by Keith Haring, for between £ 3.9 million and £ 4.5million on June 30. The prophetic work, in Haring’s trademark graphic street style, presents a world in the grip of technology and was painted the same year as the release of the first Apple Macintosh. […]]]>


Christie’s will sell an early computer painting, made in 1984 by Keith Haring, for between £ 3.9 million and £ 4.5million on June 30. The prophetic work, in Haring’s trademark graphic street style, presents a world in the grip of technology and was painted the same year as the release of the first Apple Macintosh.

The 9m² artwork is almost as familiar as its theme – it was sold from the collection of German gallery owner Paul Maenz for £ 3.9million (with fees) in London in 2018. This time around, it meets even more a public aware of the pandemic. tuned in to the dominance of technology. The work can also be paid for digitally: Christie’s will accept bitcoin or ether, including for its commission, and its third-party guarantor is also open to cryptocurrency, confirms Katharine Arnold, co-head of the art of post-war and contemporary for Christie’s Europe.

“There is a tantalizing aspect to the auction right now. Some collectors are curious about this point in time and what could happen to the prices, ”she says. The work will be offered in an auction broadcast live from London.


Benji Reid’s ‘Going Home’ (2019) to be featured at Photo London

Art Basel confirmed that its first in-person event since June 2019 will take place in Basel from September 24-26 (from September 20 for VIPs), but “with certain restrictions and adaptations”. Sanitary conditions at the Swiss fair include proof of full vaccination against Covid-19 or a recent negative test, while more space will be created thanks to a scaled-down event and public weekend tickets will be reduced by a third.

However, one wonders how full the aisles of Art Basel will be, as travel and quarantine restrictions are slowly lifting. Other fairs have been held in a similar style, but have mostly taken place in cities like New York or Hong Kong, which have more local visitors than Basel. But with the Zurich Art Weekend which takes place just before (September 17-19) and the remote broadcasting which has served its Hong Kong fair well, the organizers of Art Basel are banking on sufficient momentum for its flagship fair to continue to grow. steal.

“It’s a courageous decision because it’s a fair that everyone comes to from virtually every city in the world. But if they think it can go ahead, then that’s fantastic, ”says James Holland-Hibbert, a British art dealer.

Photo London has also confirmed that it will be held at Somerset House (September 8-12), in tandem with a digital fair that will run through September 28. Tefaf Maastricht, however, has decided to cancel its postponed fair to September and take place only online. this year.


“Kuchu Ndagamuntu (queer identity card)” by Leilah Babirye (2021) © Mark Blower

There was a lot of praise for the first London Gallery Weekend, which brought activity to 137 independent spaces in the city just when needed (4-6 June). Most of the participating galleries were significantly busier than usual, despite the London rain that graced the opening day.

At the Stephen Friedman Gallery, which opened three exhibitions, there was “a constant flow of admixture of visitors,” says Mira Dimitrova, Director of Sales. All of the works of sculptor Leilah Babirye have been sold ($ 15,000 to $ 50,000). Babirye had to flee Uganda in 2015 when she was revealed as gay and was granted asylum in the United States in 2018.

The works of another African artist, Marc Padeu from Cameroon, had previously sold at the Jack Bell Gallery ($ 45,000 to $ 55,000), but visitors indulged in his eye-catching work. “Many said it was their first time in a shopping mall,” says director Oly Durey.

Even more could be done to unite London’s disparate galleries and help make weekends a viable alternative to art fairs, which are considerably more expensive for exhibitors. Suggestions include more performance and conference lineup and even “food trucks hopping between galleries,” suggests exhibitor Lyndsey Ingram, who described the event overall as “a good first stab at” . Most expect the collaboration to become an annual event.


Saatchi Yates Gallery in the Burlington Arcade in London

Saatchi Yates Gallery in the Burlington Arcade in London

As luxury retailers rethink their stores, more spaces are available for galleries who wish, on the contrary, to increase their physical presence. London’s last spots can be found at Burlington Arcade, a Dickensian covered shopping area off Piccadilly, built in 1819 and bought by billionaire brothers David and Simon Reuben nearly 200 years later. A dozen spaces in buildings with bay windows have been reserved for galleries, confirms David Rosen, partner at the specialized real estate agencies Pilcher.

Already in Saatchi Yates, a gallery founded last year in Cork Street near London by Phoebe Saatchi Yates, daughter of collector Charles Saatchi, and her husband, Arthur Yates. They took two spaces on the arch, initially using its distinctive windows to display the works while locked.

“We wanted a way to show art that is not virtual. The arcade is lost in time, charming and quite magical – everything you need to love about London, ”says Saatchi Yates.


“Rags-to-Wobble” by Suzanne Jackson (2020) © David Kaminsky

that of New York Ortuzar projects opens this week an exhibition that brings the 1970s to life Sapphire show, which founder Ales Ortuzar said was the first in the United States to be dedicated to African American women. The original took place in the short-lived Gallery 32 in Los Angeles and featured six artists, including Suzanne Jackson, who also ran the gallery.

This month’s exhibition takes up the poster from the 1970 exhibition – the only documentation that remains – which featured childhood photos of the artists with a caption that is the title of the relaunched exhibition: “You’ve come a long way, baby ”.

Ortuzar says conversations with the four remaining artists, including Jackson, made him realize that “we didn’t want a nostalgic show about a moment in history, it’s more about their successes since then.”

He notes that one of the featured artists, Betye Saar, now 94, organized an exhibition to mark the reopening of the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 2019. Ortuzar’s exhibition brings together around 35 of their works, from the 1960s to more recently, and runs until July 31 (price range of $ 15,000 to $ 250,000).

To pursue @FTLifeArts on Twitter to discover our latest stories first





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Experiments through color geometries and the human element | Culture https://songhaizeng.com/experiments-through-color-geometries-and-the-human-element-culture/ https://songhaizeng.com/experiments-through-color-geometries-and-the-human-element-culture/#respond Wed, 09 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/experiments-through-color-geometries-and-the-human-element-culture/ Louis rodriguez Tit may be that of Louis Rodriguez first official exhibition, but he is certainly no stranger to the art world. Rodriguez says his artistic beginnings were like that of “any other artist”: having trouble drawing in class. He’s been in the industry for years, doing everything from business and fashion illustration to digital […]]]>










Tit may be that of Louis Rodriguez first official exhibition, but he is certainly no stranger to the art world.

Rodriguez says his artistic beginnings were like that of “any other artist”: having trouble drawing in class. He’s been in the industry for years, doing everything from business and fashion illustration to digital and graphic design to 3D animation and video editing.

At one point in his career, Rodriguez found himself wanting to go back to more traditional skills. Oil on canvas. Landscapes. Portraits. “But little by little there was something in me [that] needed more than landscapes and portraits, ”says Rodriguez. “I wanted to take it to another level. ”

This marked the conception of Experiments through color geometries and the human element. The collection, 12 oil paintings on panel, is currently on display at Modbo.

In the series, there is a lack of traditional details. Instead, the work is defined by texture, geometric elements, and hard edges – abrupt changes in color. “I’ve always loved color since I was a kid,” says Rodriguez. “Color makes everyone happy.” The interplay between the different elements – foreground and background, color, shapes and figures – gives, as he calls it, a “certain immediacy” to the work.

Besides texture and color, the art and storytelling is minimalist. And the minimum titles of the paintings are intended to reflect the minimal style of the work. “All paintings are just names in a nutshell. Like ‘Shaftan’ or ‘Alluvium’ ‘Anastasi.’ “Congratulations,” Rodriguez says. “I don’t want to complicate things.” He describes the show as a “quiet world”.






EventHorizon1-2.jpg




Rodriguez was born in Cuba. His family, wanting to escape communism, immigrated to the United States when he was 6 years old. Rodriguez cites his travels from Cuba to America, the television and media of the time, the minimalism and retro-futurism of the 70s as major influences on his art.

His work is intentional – informed by his interests and experiences – but not contrived. “I don’t think of a series in advance,” he said. “I start to paint, then something starts to bloom, then I see it, then I start building on it. And then I can go back and analyze it. For Rodriguez, it is during the process of creating art that its meaning emerges.

Rodriguez says COVID-19 has not affected his creative output. In fact, pandemic isolation has helped his art: “My creativity has almost improved in some ways. But he notes that the arts community as a whole has suffered. “[Art] brings people together, ”he says. The reopening of the city is an opportunity to reconnect.

Rodriguez says the city’s arts community has come a long way and has the potential to grow further. “I want more diverse contemporary art here in Colorado Springs,” he says. “The art that is ready to come out of academics [and the] traditional mentality of painting.



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Intimacy Coordinators are the new BFFs of movie stars. But what are they actually doing? https://songhaizeng.com/intimacy-coordinators-are-the-new-bffs-of-movie-stars-but-what-are-they-actually-doing/ https://songhaizeng.com/intimacy-coordinators-are-the-new-bffs-of-movie-stars-but-what-are-they-actually-doing/#respond Mon, 07 Jun 2021 16:18:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/intimacy-coordinators-are-the-new-bffs-of-movie-stars-but-what-are-they-actually-doing/ The 33-year-old British actress wrote, co-directed and starred in “I May Destroy You”, a 12-part drama about a young writer seeking to rebuild her life after being sexually assaulted. At Sunday’s ceremony, the critically acclaimed HBO series won the award for Best Miniseries, with Coel also taking home the gong for Best Leading Actress. In […]]]>


The 33-year-old British actress wrote, co-directed and starred in “I May Destroy You”, a 12-part drama about a young writer seeking to rebuild her life after being sexually assaulted.

At Sunday’s ceremony, the critically acclaimed HBO series won the award for Best Miniseries, with Coel also taking home the gong for Best Leading Actress.

In his acceptance speech, Coel paid tribute to the show’s director of privacy, Ita O’Brien, giving her credit for making filming of the series possible, which deals with the themes of consent, assault and trauma.

“Thank you for your existence in our industry, for making the space safe, for creating physical, emotional and professional boundaries so that we can work on exploitation, loss of respect, abuse of power without being exploited or abused in the process, “says Coel.

O’Brien, author of “Intimacy on Set Guidelines” a best practice guide for tackling simulated sex and nudity – has also worked on hit shows such as “Normal People”, “Sex Education” and “Gangs of London”.

What is a privacy coordinator?

The role of the intimacy coordinator is to support the actor in any intimate action on set, such as touch kissing, physical contact, and mock sex. They plan, choreograph, and often liaise with the cast and production crew to make sure those in front of and behind the camera feel safe and comfortable with every aspect and step of the process.

There are several training organizations around the world including Intimacy Directors and Coordinators in the US and Intimacy for Stage and Screen (formerly IDI-UK) in the UK.

And in April of this year, the Screen Actors Guild – American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA) announced plans to launch a registry and provide accreditation for coordinator training programs. privacy, with the aim of creating an industry standard for the role.

O’Brien told CNN in an email that intimacy coordinators must have a thorough knowledge of the actor-director process, understand power dynamics, and must be trained in intimacy pedagogy and coordination. for theater and cinema.

They must “have body and dance skills, body awareness and anatomy to be able to bring clarity to physical dance,” she explained.

At the end of the basic training, they enter a mentoring program which allows them to put their training into practice in the profession before obtaining certification.

Why have studios started using them?

The #MeToo movement and increased awareness of abuse of power in film and television have created a demand for intimacy coordinators on set.

The Harvey Weinstein scandal and other incidents of sexual misconduct exposed an industry in which actor boundaries were often ignored and where there was widespread misconduct both on and off screen.
'Bridgerton' The Intimacy Coordinator's Job Isn't As Sexy As You Think

SAG-AFTRA said in October 2020 that it had strived to create “safer working conditions for members and the industry as a whole” since the years when the actions of Weinstein – one of the most important people. most powerful in the entertainment industry – have arrived. enlighten.

O’Brien said she believes “the role of the privacy coordinator is essential to protect artists in the creation of intimate content.”

She told CNN: “Our process ensures that a safe and professional structure is created, with open communication and agreed consent at all times, within which everyone can bring the best of their professional acting skills to the table. scene.”

Create a secure space

In a recent interview with CNN, Elizabeth Talbot, intimacy coordinator for the hugely popular Netflix series “Bridgerton,” said that a “privacy rider” explains exactly what an actor is willing to do in a movie. scene.

“With the concept of consent that we’re working with, of course, if there’s something where at some point someone’s like, ‘Oh, you know, I don’t want to do that,’ they don’t. ever will, ”she said. “And it’s also my job to stand in front of any director or producer and say, ‘Hey, you know, like they just weren’t comfortable with that. “I’ve been very lucky to work with great directors and producers, so it never happened.”

Bridgerton star Phoebe Dynevor told Grazia magazine she felt
Phoebe Dynevor, who plays Daphne Bridgerton, told Grazia magazine in January this year that she felt “safe” with Talbot on set when she filmed a graphic sex scene.

“It was so awesome, because it was safe and fun: you choreograph it like a stunt or a dance,” she said.

“It’s crazy to me that (a privacy coordinator) hasn’t been there in the past,” Dynevor said. “I’ve done sex scenes before that I can’t believe: that was only five or six years ago, but it wouldn’t be allowed now.”

CNN’s Lisa Respers France contributed to this report.



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Viking treasure will be on display at Aberdeen Art Gallery https://songhaizeng.com/viking-treasure-will-be-on-display-at-aberdeen-art-gallery/ https://songhaizeng.com/viking-treasure-will-be-on-display-at-aberdeen-art-gallery/#respond Sun, 06 Jun 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/viking-treasure-will-be-on-display-at-aberdeen-art-gallery/ One of the most important British archaeological finds of the century – The Galloway Hoard – will be on display at the Aberdeen Art Gallery. The new exhibit, Galloway Hoard: Viking-age Treasure, offers the first chance to see details – hidden by dirt and corrosion from over a thousand years – revealed by conservation experts, […]]]>


One of the most important British archaeological finds of the century – The Galloway Hoard – will be on display at the Aberdeen Art Gallery.

The new exhibit, Galloway Hoard: Viking-age Treasure, offers the first chance to see details – hidden by dirt and corrosion from over a thousand years – revealed by conservation experts, thorough cleaning and cutting-edge research.

Currently on display at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh, history buffs from the North East will be able to view the exhibition at the Aberdeen Art Gallery from July 30, 2022 to October 23, 2022.

The treasure is the richest collection of rare and unique objects from the Viking Age ever found in Britain or Ireland. Buried around 900 AD, it brings together an astonishing variety of objects and materials in a single find.

In addition to the cleaned and preserved artefacts on display, the audiovisual and graphics will provide a behind-the-scenes look at archaeological and scientific details.

Galloway Hoard covered vessel. Photo from Historic Environment Scotland

Using modern technology to discover Viking treasures

A major revelation is a new detail of the single-lid container that held the precious treasures of the Galloway Hoard. The container itself is wrapped in textiles which both cover the object and make it too fragile to display.

However, new 3D models, derived from X-ray imaging performed at the British Museum and produced with the help of the Glasgow School of Art and Steven Dey of Thinksee3D Ltd, have allowed researchers to see under textiles to have a preview of the decorated surface. of the ship, revealing new details about its age and origin.

Dr Martin Goldberg, Senior Curator, Medieval Archeology and History at the National Museums of Scotland, said: It’s like the other two.

“However, the 3D model reveals that the ship is not from the Carolingian Empire (Saint Roman) of mainland Europe as we had predicted based on other similar examples.

“Instead, the decoration and design shows leopards, tigers and Zoroastrian religious symbols, all of which suggest that this is a piece of metalwork from Central Asia halfway around the world known. . “

Where does the Galloway Hoard ship come from?

Galloway Treasure
Anglo-Saxon ironwork inside the Galloway Hoard’s lidded container.

Another surprise came from the radiocarbon dating of the wool enveloping the ship, which dates to 680-780 AD.

Dr Martin Goldberg added: “So the ship comes from beyond Europe, potentially thousands of miles away, and the wool that envelops it predates the Viking Age, having more than 100 or maybe even 200 years old when he was buried.

“While the real ship is still wrapped in 1,300 year old fabric and stored safely in environmentally controlled stores for preservation and future research, it is wonderful to be able to use 21st century technology in the exhibit. to let people see what it looks like. as under these fragile textile packaging.

Bird pin preserved.

Dr Martin Goldberg said it is the “unique combination of familiar objects, exotic materials and exceptional preservation” that makes the Galloway Hoard a fascinating find.

The retired businessman and Derek McLennan discovered the treasure in 2014 while walking through an area of ​​church grounds in Dumfries and Galloway with two local ministers.

Research continues on the Galloway Hoard. The Arts and Humanities Research Council has given support to a £ 1million three-year research project, Unwrapping the Galloway Hoard, led by National Museums Scotland in partnership with the University of Glasgow which will start later this month -this.



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Meet 2 local artists featured in Story Garden during Utah Pride Week https://songhaizeng.com/meet-2-local-artists-featured-in-story-garden-during-utah-pride-week/ https://songhaizeng.com/meet-2-local-artists-featured-in-story-garden-during-utah-pride-week/#respond Sat, 05 Jun 2021 17:22:17 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/meet-2-local-artists-featured-in-story-garden-during-utah-pride-week/ Perspective is everything, or at least it is when looking at Rian Kasner’s 3D art installation titled “See Us” at the Story Garden at the Utah Pride Center in Salt Lake City. The piece reflects portraits of individuals belonging to the LGBTQ community and aims to illustrate the coming out process. The piece starts out […]]]>


Perspective is everything, or at least it is when looking at Rian Kasner’s 3D art installation titled “See Us” at the Story Garden at the Utah Pride Center in Salt Lake City.

The piece reflects portraits of individuals belonging to the LGBTQ community and aims to illustrate the coming out process. The piece starts out in black and white, but as you move through it the portraits become brighter in color and happier in composition. Kasner said the play is meant to reflect the loneliness and isolation one initially feels before moving on to a place of community and pride.

Rian Kasner’s art installation titled “See Us”.
Rian kasner

“This is the journey we are facing. A shared experience that many do not know we have had. The world outside us does not see what we have gone through to accept us. We want society to change perspective. We want you to see us, ”said Kasner, 22.

Kasner's art instillation piece was featured at the 2021 Utah Pride Center event.

Kasner’s art instillation piece was featured at the 2021 Utah Pride Center event.
Rian kasner

Part of the play reflects Kasner’s own experience.

“It’s scary when you first find out these things about yourself and you don’t see anyone else who, it looks like they’re going through the same thing as you, you feel very isolated,” said Kasner. “It’s always very difficult because everything in society tells you it’s wrong and that’s why I think it’s so difficult no matter where you grew up or how you grew up.”

The Story Garden, part of Utah Pride Week, is an interactive outdoor exhibit curated with national and local partners. The exhibition showcases artists from the community, creating a space for representation.

Proclamations and flag raising were held earlier this week to kick off the events of Pride Week. An interfaith service was held Wednesday evening and a rainbow march and rally is scheduled for Sunday, starting at the State Capitol and ending at Liberty Park. The annual pride parade and accompanying festival are not held this year due to the pandemic.

Kasner grew up in Puyallup, Washington, then moved to Utah to study at Southern Utah University. Kasner studied graphic design and “fell in the murals” when a trainer from SUU requested a wall design for the weight room. Needing volunteer hours, Kasner also offered to paint the mural. Upon stumbling over the first mural, Kasner discovered a career path.

Now a graduate, Kasner is a traveling muralist whose goal is to paint one in every state across the country.

Kasner enjoys painting pieces with an underlying meaning when given a commission and creative freedom. Some of Kasner’s murals feature portraits of people within the LGBTQ community.

“It comes back to that standardization thing I was talking about earlier. I just want us to be there and normalized, but also seen at the same time, ”Kasner said. “So it’s an interesting dichotomy between the way I put my art on the wall and the meaning behind it, because looking at it you’re going to draw your own meaning. But once you’ve kind of read the artist’s statement, it has its own meaning. He has secret visibility.

The Story Garden also offers community partnerships through art exhibitions like Caitlyn Barhost’s.

The University of Utah’s Transgender Health Services has called for artists to commission a piece to show in the Story Garden. Barhorst, 27, a transgender artist, answered the call.

Barhorst piece commissioned by the University of Utah's Transgender Health Services at 2021 Story Garden.

Piece by Caitlyn Barhorst commissioned by the University of Utah Transgender Health Services at 2021 Story Garden.
Arial Lee Malan

Barhorst’s piece is a sculpture of butterfly wings made from reclaimed wood.

“The imagery of a butterfly wing represents this kind of transformation for the transgender community. I immediately thought of trying to use salvaged materials, or you just know how to reuse materials and create something brand new, to add another layer of transformation to that.

Barhorst continued, “It was nice to create the symbol of not only my creative side and everything, but you actually know being able to create this thing that people can maybe connect with and have their own story to tell. . “

Parents helped shape Barhorst’s background growing up in Texas, with his mother being described as a “clever” seamstress and his father as an engineer who taught Barhorst how to build things.

Barhorst now works in an architectural firm in Salt Lake City and owns an art business called “Alabaster and Stone”.

Barhorst describes the Salt Lake community as inclusive, pointing out pride flags and symbols on windows of businesses and homes, which Barhorst said is important.

“It’s important to know that we are seeing you. I think it’s something else … when you know people have rainbows on their backpacks or rainbows in their store, it’s like we’re here, and so are you and we see it, and you know this level of existing whole world, ”said Barhorst. “Visibility is a big part of what the fight has always been for. “

Pieces by Kasner and Barhorst and others can be seen at the Story Garden at the Utah Pride Center in Washington Square from 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. until Monday. Funds raised during Utah Pride Center Pride Week will be used to fund the centre’s programs and services.

For more information on events, tickets, or schedule, visit utahpridecenter.org.



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A small town, an old restaurant and the guys who brought it to life | Alabama News https://songhaizeng.com/a-small-town-an-old-restaurant-and-the-guys-who-brought-it-to-life-alabama-news/ https://songhaizeng.com/a-small-town-an-old-restaurant-and-the-guys-who-brought-it-to-life-alabama-news/#respond Sat, 05 Jun 2021 04:01:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/a-small-town-an-old-restaurant-and-the-guys-who-brought-it-to-life-alabama-news/ WAVERLY, Alabama (AP) – As a resident of the small town of Waverly in eastern Alabama for almost 20 years, Andy Anderson likes to say his adopted hometown is “two square miles and away. from any other place “. Waverly has a post office, four churches, around 145 residents, and not a single traffic light. […]]]>


WAVERLY, Alabama (AP) – As a resident of the small town of Waverly in eastern Alabama for almost 20 years, Andy Anderson likes to say his adopted hometown is “two square miles and away. from any other place “.

Waverly has a post office, four churches, around 145 residents, and not a single traffic light.

It is also home to the Waverly Local, a Southern dining gem in a century-old building that has become a destination for people who live in or visit the region of the three counties of Chambers, Lee and Tallapoosa.

“We’re doing pretty well,” says Christian Watson, executive chef and Anderson’s partner in the restaurant. “We have a lot of people from Auburn, Opelika, Dadeville, Alex City and Lake (Martin).

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“You know, in culinary school, it’s about (all) ‘location, location, location’; in a business school, it’s “location, location, location,” Watson adds. “When we started to conceptualize this, we thought, ‘We’re kind of in the middle of nowhere.’ But come find out, we’re kind of in the middle of it all.

Watson and Anderson, who have been close friends since growing up together in Auburn, teamed up to open the Waverly Local – or “the Local,” as the locals call it – three years ago last January.

Previously home to a Waverly favorite called the Yellow Hammer Restaurant and, before that, another restaurant and bar named Peyton Place, the building had been vacant for several years.

“I think Waverly just felt like something was missing when this building was empty,” said Anderson, who lives with his wife and son in a 140-year-old house about 100 yards from the restaurant. “We were delighted to bring it back to life. I think the community has embraced it and love having it here.

Guests are drawn to the restaurant’s nostalgic charm, laid-back vibe, and inspired but unpretentious menu, which includes entrees such as Wickles Pickles Wrapped in Bacon and entrees such as Grilled Rib Eye with Cream. horseradish, a seafood dish from the Gulf of Alabama, and a fabulous braised pork steak that is served with a casserole of squash and a tomato pudding base and topped with a crispy fried pork skin.

Where possible, the restaurant obtains its produce from local producers, including tomatoes and squash from Mace Glasscock and collard greens from Andrew Lowery in Waverly, as well as cucumbers and lettuce from Ralf du Toit from Extreme Green. Farms in Auburn.

“Everything we do here is simple,” says Watson. “I just call it Simple South. . . . The most popular ingredient we use here is salt and pepper.

“We just have fun creating and reworking and constantly trying to create better versions of what we did last time around. “

Anderson and Watson – who also opened the Plaza Bar & Lounge, a burger and beer restaurant in Auburn’s new Midtown development last August – date back to when they played on the same basketball team as the recreation league when they were about 6 years old. .

“We’ve been good friends all these years,” says Watson. “We never lost contact and always kept an eye on each other.”

After graduating from Auburn High School in 1996, they went in opposite directions before they finally ended up in the same place.

Anderson headed west to ski and work in Jackson Hole, Wyo., And while in the west he then attended the University of Montana, where he studied business.

Watson, meanwhile, went to South Carolina to work on his uncle Bob’s 90-acre farm. His aunt Linda was battling cancer and his uncle needed help running the farm and taking care of his wife.

“The garden was my first big project,” Watson recalls. “And the light bulb went out for me at the end of summer – eating that plate of vegetables that I was responsible for, from planting them to cooking. My family said to me: ‘You are good at cooking. You should take a look at this.

A seed was planted and he enrolled in Johnson & Wales University Culinary School in Charleston, South Carolina, then embarked on a culinary adventure in which he worked as a chef at aboard yachts that have sailed from Maine to Key West and from Southern California to Alaska. .

He moved to Birmingham for a few years to work as a bartender at Frank Stitt’s Bottega restaurant and as a cook at Chris Hastings’ Hot and Hot Fish Club, before getting a job as an executive chef at Pine Creek Sporting Club in Okeechobee, Fla. then returned to Charleston to take the position of Executive Chef at Carter’s Kitchen.

Anderson, meanwhile, left Montana after about four years, and he almost followed his buddy Watson to Johnson & Wales Culinary School, even going so far as to tour campus.

Instead, he returned home to Alabama to work with his friends Trey and Will Sims, the brothers whose Sims Foods Inc. produces and distributes Wickles Pickles.

The Sims Brothers started their business in December 1998 in Dadeville, about 15 miles northwest of Waverly, and Anderson joined them about a year later.

Soon after, Anderson married and he and his wife, Marty, moved to Waverly, where they purchased an old country house built in the 1880s. (During a renovation several years later , he discovered that the house was once owned by a great-great-uncle.)

Considering that Andy worked for Wickles in Dadeville and Marty was at the time a special education teacher for the schools in the town of Auburn, Waverly was the perfect halfway point for them.

“It’s just a great little town,” Anderson says, “and that just seemed to suit us.”

Graphic designer Scott Peek helped put Waverly on the map when he moved here and opened his nationally renowned Standard Deluxe graphic design and screen printing business in 1991.

A decade later, in 2001, the townspeople started the Waverly “Old 280” Boogie, a music, food, arts and culture festival that began as a way to celebrate the decision of the State of Alabama not to route a US 280 expansion to the middle of town, thus saving the town from being razed and paved.

The festival, which now takes place in the spring and fall, has drawn Southern musical luminaries like Alabama Shakes, Civil Wars and Lee Bains III & the Glory Fires and has grown into one of the coolest events in the South. . Peek hosts the Boogie in the courtyard of its Standard Deluxe Resort, which transforms into a mini-Woodstock on festival weekends.

The Waverly Local is also hosting their own Waverly Tomato Showdown, where growers across the region bring their precious tomatoes to town to see which one is better. After a sabbatical year in 2020 due to COVID-19, the showdown returns for its 13th year on July 24.

It was this creative small town synergy that drew Anderson and his wife to Waverly in the first place, and ultimately led him to purchase the old Yellow Hammer building and open the Waverly Local.

“There’s an appeal to Waverly, and I’m not sure if it’s the size or the story or a combination of the two,” Anderson says. “We found it to be a lovely place, and having music, arts and culture with everything Scott does at Standard Deluxe has certainly helped too.”

Anderson has fond memories of great meals and good times both at Peyton Place, which closed shortly after he and his wife moved to town, and at the Yellow Hammer, which had a popular run before it closed. circa 2010.

“I don’t remember a bad boss having been there,” he said. “It was always good food. And, between these two entities, it was always high-end meals. I wouldn’t say it was a white tablecloth, but it was still a high end meal.

The Waverly Local began to meet after Anderson’s old friend Watson returned to Auburn about six years ago to work as a chef at The Hound. He moved to the old quarter where he grew up, just down the street from his father, Douglas Watson, the former general manager of the town of Auburn.

Shortly after Watson returned to town, he and Anderson began to hatch a plan to open their own place.

“It was by chance that Christian came back and was looking to open a restaurant in the area,” says Anderson. “We hadn’t worked together (before), but we had been friends for a long time and shared a vision that was close enough that we could take the next step.”

They started the renovation and construction in early 2017 and spent a year preparing the building to reopen.

“When we were getting ready to open up and tell people what we were doing, people were really excited (saying), ‘Oh, we loved the yellow hammer,’” says Watson. “They had great food and good service, and it’s a good place.”

Long before it was a restaurant space, the old brick building across from the Waverly Post Office housed, on several occasions, a garage, barber shop and general store, according to a local historian.

When they decided to open the Waverly Local, Anderson and Watson wanted to honor the history of the building while transforming it into a functional and attractive dining space.

The old garage doors from the building’s beginnings as an auto workshop remain, as does the original floor, which had been seasoned with decades of oil stains and was sealed to preserve its character. The exterior has been sanded to remove the white paint and expose the original red brick.

Alexander City artisan metalworker John Howell of Madwind Studio built the bar, host stand, and some of the tables, and Emily Koelle, an interior design graduate from Auburn University, oversaw the design. from the dining room, as well as the new courtyard which opened this spring.

“Emily lives in Birmingham now, but was finishing the design program at Auburn when she started working on the project,” says Anderson. “Emily is amazing, and it really wouldn’t be the Local without her eye and attention to detail.”

With the addition of the courtyard, the Waverly Local can now accommodate around 160 indoor and outdoor guests – 15 more people than the entire population of Waverly, according to the 2010 census.

Almost half of their customers are first-time visitors who have heard of the Local and want to experience it.

So the rumor has spread over the little gem of Southern catering which, as Watson says, is now in the middle of it all.

“It’s a fun little community – a lot of good people here,” he says. “The people who come here, they understand. And if they haven’t been there before and they come, they say, “Dude, this is a special place. “

The city and the restaurant.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



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In “Sweet Tooth”, a taste of fantasy anchored in reality https://songhaizeng.com/in-sweet-tooth-a-taste-of-fantasy-anchored-in-reality/ https://songhaizeng.com/in-sweet-tooth-a-taste-of-fantasy-anchored-in-reality/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 16:53:50 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/in-sweet-tooth-a-taste-of-fantasy-anchored-in-reality/ It was all about the ears. With very little rehearsal time, the practice effects team had to make the right choices. Perched atop the head of child actor Christian Convery, who plays the half-stag hero of Netflix’s whimsical new dystopian drama “Sweet Tooth,” the ears, soft and furry, had to move perfectly. This meant that […]]]>


It was all about the ears.

With very little rehearsal time, the practice effects team had to make the right choices. Perched atop the head of child actor Christian Convery, who plays the half-stag hero of Netflix’s whimsical new dystopian drama “Sweet Tooth,” the ears, soft and furry, had to move perfectly. This meant that they had to move like a deer.

It was a job for Grant Lehmann, a puppeteer and ear wrestler. Working with a pair of hollow, bendable latex ears and a remote control setup, Lehmann found a way to practice his job and create mischief at the same time, especially whenever someone new arrived on set. .

“When someone was a little green and I knew this was the first time I saw him, I would just shut up and do nothing while he was talking to Christian,” Lehmann said in a video chat from his home in Australia. “Then I would choose my moment to wiggle my ears and get that little shock back from them. “

It takes a small army to get any TV series off the ground, especially one with as many moving parts (and ears) as “Sweet Tooth.” Airing Friday on Netflix, the show, based on Jeff Lemire’s much darker graphic novel, takes a decidedly analog approach to create a fantastical world of hybrid creatures that would appear to demand digital solutions. Computer-generated imagery was certainly used in the making of “Sweet Tooth,” but only when needed, often to clean the screen of its hard-working puppeteers.

In a series of video chats, performers in front of and behind the camera spoke about what it takes to bring “Sweet Tooth” to life.

The show, like the comic book, takes place in a post-apocalyptic world ravaged by a virus known as the Sick. For creators and showrunners, Beth Schwartz and Jim Mickle, the first big question was how to describe the virus. What symptoms would he inflict on his victims? How would they react? How would they die?

“In the comics, it’s more like a horror pandemic,” Mickle said from his Los Angeles office. “It sounds like ’28 days later’ where people have growths and ooze and stuff.”

As they worked on the pilot, Mickle recalled thinking, “I feel like we’ve seen this before. What haven’t we seen for a while? His response: “Just a bad flu. It should be just a bad flu.

The real world would soon provide plenty of sources on what an accurate depiction of a deadly influenza-like pandemic might look like. But the pilot was actually shot in May and June 2019, long before Covid-19 shut down. Luckily for the growers, they had thought deeply about what such a scenario might look like and had done their homework, examining previous viruses such as bird flu and SARS. “All of our science has tracked the onset of the real pandemic,” Mickle said.

Based on their research, they envisioned for the pilot what specific elements – such as the hospital’s strict mask policies – might look like, aspects that would correspond to eventual reality.

Victims of “sick” have symptoms that seem familiar to them and require few special effects: deep circles appear around their eyes and runny noses. The telltale sign is a trembling pinky finger.

Health and safety measures are familiar – to a point. Yes, there are temperature controls and hand sanitizing stations. But the quarantine is ruthless: a symptomatic man, organizing a dinner, is tied to a chair with cellophane, and his house is set on fire.

The producers had already shot the pilot in New Zealand; then, in 2020, it was time to shoot the rest of the season. The location was doubly fortuitous. First of all, as anyone who’s seen The Lord of the Rings trilogy can tell you, the island country has an almost unearthly beauty – its endless green hills and sheer cliffs naturally suggest a fantasy world, no need to. CGI landscapes common to, say, most superhero movies.

And on a practical level, New Zealand has barely been touched by the virus in real life. While many productions around the world were closing, “Sweet Tooth” was able to continue (with the Covid-19 protocol in place). It was like a beautiful bubble.

“When we found out that New Zealand was one of the fastest recovering countries and that we would be able to shoot there, it was a really good thing,” said Nonso Anozie, who plays former mountain football pro Tommy Jepperd. “The way they handled the health regulations and ordinances that they had to follow, I really felt like they had done a great job. “

For a year, the “Offstage” series followed the theater until it closed. We now take a look at its rebound. Join Times theater reporter Michael Paulson as he explores the signs of hope in a changed city with Lin-Manuel Miranda, a performance by Shakespeare in the Park and more.

For Schwartz, being able to continue working was a gift in the midst of an era that was otherwise bleak.

“It was cathartic,” she said from her Los Angeles office. “Unlike in the real world, ‘Sweet Tooth’ feels like she has a lot more hope for her future.”

The embodiment of that hope is Gus, the 10-year-old stag boy played by Convery. Raised in a cabin in the woods by his father (Will Forte), Gus is one of the hybrid children born around the same time that “the sick” breaks out. Hybrids are widely believed to be the source of the virus and are being hunted down by a militia calling themselves the Last Men. Older than most hybrids and blessed with the ability to speak, Gus is a quirk among oddities.

“Gus is an innocent, very upbeat, positive deer boy,” said Convery, 11, of Vancouver in a group video chat with Anozie; a bust of Gus’s head and antlers were visible behind him. “He never saw any human other than his father because they lived together in the woods for 10 years.”

Gus’ reluctant protector is Tommy. A reformed Last Man, Tommy or Big Man, reconfigures his moral compass as he goes.

“In this post-apocalyptic world, Jepperd is almost a modern cowboy, wandering from town to town in a desolate and horribly beautiful landscape,” Anozie said from London. “It reminds me of a character from ‘Old Yeller’ or ‘Shane’ or something, but in a modern setting, in this world where you have to lie, steal, kill and cheat – do whatever you can to survive the day -today. “

Anozie, who has worked with many child actors, said he had an immediate chemistry with his co-star. This was in large part because of Convery’s maturity on camera, he said.

“He’s a very special kid,” Anozie said as Convery smirked from his half of the split screen. “When a director said, ‘I want it that way,’ he got it the first time, and he did it instantly.”

The relationship between Gus and Big Man is the emotional heart of “Sweet Tooth”. But Gus is not the only hybrid child.

At the start of the series, Dr. Singh (Adeel Akhtar), who appears as another main character of “Sweet Tooth”, is called to the nursery. What he finds there is breathtaking: a room full of remarkably lifelike hybrid babies, deeply asleep. There is a baby owl, a baby dog, a baby porcupine and others.

It’s a moment that makes the viewer wonder: how the hell did they do this?

Short answer: advanced puppets, three to four puppeteers per infant, with a breathing apparatus installed in the chest – another example of using in-camera solutions instead of CGI The results are almost tactile. You want to reach out and touch these babies.

“If we did it with visual effects, you won’t have the same feeling of awe when you have a green ball that is sitting in the cradle,” said Justin Raleigh, whose company, Fractured FX, has designed babies. “This is your first hybrid reveal. It has to work, or it doesn’t. It must take you into the story.

Ultimately, “Sweet Tooth” aims to create optimism in a ravaged (albeit beautiful) world. It is about starting from scratch, a theme that stands out in the face of an apocalypse, even a pandemic.

“Gus is not oblivious,” said Susan Downey, one of the Los Angeles executive producers. (Robert Downey Jr., her husband, is also an executive producer.) “He’s lively, but he chooses to be optimistic. I think those kinds of messages, wrapped up in this escape adventure, are what an audience craves right now.

“The series says, ‘Embrace differences, don’t be afraid of them, and build community. I am delighted to share it with the world.



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Anticipation builds for the 146th UW launch, which will be held virtually https://songhaizeng.com/anticipation-builds-for-the-146th-uw-launch-which-will-be-held-virtually/ https://songhaizeng.com/anticipation-builds-for-the-146th-uw-launch-which-will-be-held-virtually/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 22:48:14 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/anticipation-builds-for-the-146th-uw-launch-which-will-be-held-virtually/ The Drumheller fountain turns purple. The iconic University of Washington monument will be illuminated in the school’s signature color from dusk to dawn as anticipation builds for the launch ceremonies scheduled for the weekend of June 12 and 13. Special accent lighting is just one of many features UW is adding to its already beautiful […]]]>


The Drumheller fountain turns purple.

The iconic University of Washington monument will be illuminated in the school’s signature color from dusk to dawn as anticipation builds for the launch ceremonies scheduled for the weekend of June 12 and 13.

Special accent lighting is just one of many features UW is adding to its already beautiful campus to give graduates the opportunity to pose for photos with family and friends. Special banners will be hung at the Suzzallo Library and the HUB, among others. The sidewalks of the Quad and along Rainier Vista will be decorated and 4-foot-high W blocks will be strategically placed, making the already great photo ops even better.

“The start is our most important celebration of the year, and we wanted to find a way to honor the trials, resilience and extraordinary accomplishments of our class of 2021 while being mindful of an ever-changing public health situation. . And so, we decided to turn the campus itself into a party that our graduates and their families can enjoy, each in their own way and according to their own level of comfort, ”said Denzil Suite, Vice President of UW for student life.

Events culminate this year with UW’s second virtual launch, the Seattle event starting at noon on June 12, 10 a.m. on June 12 in Tacoma, and 1 p.m. on June 13 in Bothell.

The online ceremony, the second in the school’s 161-year history, celebrates the Class of 2021. People around the world are expected to attend from more than 30 countries. Translation will be provided in nine languages. UW President Ana Mari Cauce will preside as nearly 18,300 degrees will be conferred.

“Our graduates and their families have so much to be proud of as they mark this important milestone. Their determination and resilience throughout the pandemic has been inspiring, and we are all excited to see what this amazing class will do as Husky alumni, ”said Cauce.

Jane Lubchenco, who serves as deputy director for climate and environment in the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Biden administration, will be the guest speaker. Lubchenco, who received a master’s degree in zoology from UW in 1971, also served in the Obama administration as head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere. She is a renowned marine biologist and a faculty member at Oregon State University.

“We are very proud to count Dr Lubchenco among our alumni and delighted that she is this year’s opening speaker. As a scientist and policy expert, she exemplifies what our graduates can aspire to, and as we look to a brighter future, her optimism and conviction make her the perfect person to share her experience and point. of view, ”Cauce said.

There is a lot to celebrate at the start of this year. According to preliminary data that will be presented to the Board of Regents next week:

  • For work carried out in Seattle campus, a total of 14,123 degrees will be awarded, namely: 8,327 bachelor’s degrees, 4,320 master’s degrees, 619 professional degrees, 11 specialist education degrees and 846 doctoral degrees.
  • AT UW Bothell, a forecast of 2,107 diplomas will be awarded, including 1,877 baccalaureates and 230 master’s degrees. This is the 30th launching ceremony of UW Bothell and its biggest promotion. The virtual ceremony will be preceded by a balaclava ceremony for graduate students on June 12.
  • And to UW Tacoma students will receive 2,067 degrees, including 1,626 bachelor’s degrees, 423 master’s degrees and 18 doctorates. A special drive-through celebration is scheduled for June 11 at the Washington State Fairgrounds.

Degrees are awarded to those who have met the academic requirements in the 2020-2021 academic year.

Members of the board of trustees, deans and other representatives of the university’s 16 colleges and schools will participate in the ceremony. Many colleges and schools also have separate graduation programs and investiture ceremonies.

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