Chinese Arts – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 10:09:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://songhaizeng.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-138x136.png Chinese Arts – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ 32 32 Chef and watercolorist team up to teach https://songhaizeng.com/chef-and-watercolorist-team-up-to-teach/ https://songhaizeng.com/chef-and-watercolorist-team-up-to-teach/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 20:31:26 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/chef-and-watercolorist-team-up-to-teach/ Mary Laury’s workshop will begin with a demonstration and lesson on Friday afternoon. She starts off beginners with just five colors – Alizarin Crimson, French Ultramarine Blue, New Gamboge Yellow, Olive Green, and Burnt Sienna – pressed from tubes onto a palette. PHOTO GETTY IMAGES ELLSWORTH – Painting watercolors and making Chinese-style dumplings both require […]]]>

Mary Laury’s workshop will begin with a demonstration and lesson on Friday afternoon. She starts off beginners with just five colors – Alizarin Crimson, French Ultramarine Blue, New Gamboge Yellow, Olive Green, and Burnt Sienna – pressed from tubes onto a palette. PHOTO GETTY IMAGES

ELLSWORTH – Painting watercolors and making Chinese-style dumplings both require a skilled hand. Loading your brush with too much paint and overfilling delicate packaging leads to sealed results. Creating jar stickers and watercolors each has its own set of steps to follow and light and skillful handling of tools and materials is acquired over time.

Two pros in their fields, Ellsworth artist and educator Mary Laury and Bath chef and instructor Chris Toy team up to share their expertise and teach outdoor watercolor and international cuisine from 1 p.m. on Friday 29 October at 11:30 a.m. on Sunday, October 31 at the Old River House in Kennebunkport. Former Schoodic Arts for All Executive Director Mary officially retired on August 15. A former principal of Freeport Middle School, Chris has had a parallel career teaching Asian and other international cuisines since his college days with cases of instant ramen and 25-pound bags. of rice for cooking at Bowdoin in the mid-1970s. For years, Toy taught ramen, stir-fries, spring rolls, egg soup, and other Asian dishes at Schoodic Arts for All.

By working together over the years, Chris and Mary have developed a certain chemistry. Both curious, the outgoing chef and artist revel in the different art forms and culinary traditions of the world. Watercolors and Chinese cuisine can also be intimidating, but the two teachers seek to instill confidence in their students and help them overcome doubts and enjoy the process of learning new activities.

“So many people who come to my classes are filled with trepidation and anxiety because they are told ‘I can’t do this, I’m not an artist,'” Mary reflected over coffee in outdoors at Flexit & Bakery in Ellsworth. “There is a logical sequence. This is the way to give them confidence. That’s really all they need and the rest will follow.

In the 1980s, Laury remembers being mentored by late Ellsworth artist Sarah Elizabeth Look. She credits Look for teaching her to capture the unique shapes and habitat of different watercolor flowers. She continues her visual arts odyssey, in search of artists she admires to share their know-how. Eventually, the roles turned and the active artist agreed to teach, paint, draw and dance at Schoodic Arts’ inaugural art festival in 1999. At that time, his work was featured in at least six galleries. She went on to put on the group’s first visual arts show and was subsequently hired as the first general manager of Schoodic Arts for All.

Chef Chris Toy will teach how to make ramen noodles among many other dishes as part of a weekend retreat in October. PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHRIS TOY

Chris, a “Wok Top Cooking” and “Ramen Made Simple” teacher, was among the many 2021 School Arts Festival instructors hired by Mary. In another role reversal, the prolific cookbook author (“Ramen Made Simple”, “Easy Chinese Cooking”) invited Mary to team up with him on the eve of his retirement. Thanks to Acadian Arts Retreats, the two creators have put together a fun weekend for home cooks and artists. Participants book rooms at Old River House in Kennebunkport, where Chris and Mary lead separate cooking and watercolor painting sessions, but the two groups converge for meals cooked by Chris and his cooking students.

Ramen noodles, Chinese dumplings and other Asian dishes are among the many dishes on the menu at the Acadian Arts Retreat. PHOTO COURTESY CHRIS TOY

Chris’s 12-hour international cooking class will include outings to local seafood and farmer’s markets, cooking four full meals, and instructions on how to care for the wok, knives, and pasta maker. Among the dishes and prepared meals there will be handmade noodles, stuffed pasta, sauces, maki rolls, Asian fondue and desserts.

Under Mary’s tutelage, her workshop will begin with a demonstration and lesson on Friday afternoon. She starts off beginners with just five colors – Alizarin Crimson, French Ultramarine Blue, New Gamboge Yellow, Olive Green, and Burnt Sienna – pressed from tubes onto a palette. A crucial skill, she says, is to leave enough paper blank “or it’s gone forever.” An outdoor demonstration and painting session will follow on Saturday. The sky, the water and the rocks will be at the center of the concerns. On Sunday morning, participants will have one or two finished seascapes.

Watercolor – the collision of water and paint – weaves its own magic. “It’s really an exercise in letting go. Let the medium do what he does best, ”she says. “By overworking it, it loses all the luminosity for which watercolors are famous. “

Putting people at ease, however, is the top priority in her mind.

“Helping people discover their creativity” is its goal. “If it brings happiness and joy to people, it’s a success.

To register for the Acadian Art Retreats workshop October 29-31, visit https://windham.maineadulted.org/course/acadian-arts-retreat/ or contact Chris Toy at (207) 653-3163.

In addition to editing the Arts & Entertainment section, Letitia edits special sections such as Out & About, Overview, Health Quarterly, Your Maine Home, House & Garden, and Get Ready for Winter. She is from Chicago, Illinois, but has deep family ties to the Cranberry Islands. [email protected]


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Chicago’s Asian Pop-Up Cinema To Show Martial Arts Classics | Taiwan News https://songhaizeng.com/chicagos-asian-pop-up-cinema-to-show-martial-arts-classics-taiwan-news/ https://songhaizeng.com/chicagos-asian-pop-up-cinema-to-show-martial-arts-classics-taiwan-news/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 08:54:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/chicagos-asian-pop-up-cinema-to-show-martial-arts-classics-taiwan-news/ TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – Asian pop-up cinema in Chicago will screen some of the iconic works of martial arts director Hu Jinquan (胡 金 銓). that of Chicago Asian pop-up cinema Season 13 features 30 films from Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan and China. The festival will run from September 15 to October 12. Four martial […]]]>

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – Asian pop-up cinema in Chicago will screen some of the iconic works of martial arts director Hu Jinquan (胡 金 銓).

that of Chicago Asian pop-up cinema Season 13 features 30 films from Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan and China. The festival will run from September 15 to October 12.

Four martial arts classics performed by Hu, known as King Hu, will be screened for six days starting September 22.

According to a press release from Taipei Cultural Center in New York, the four restored wuxia classics are “Dragon Inn”, “A Touch of Zen”, “Legend of the Mountain” and “Raining In The Mountain”.

The films will be available online in the United States, while “Dragon Inn” will also screen in a drive-in on September 28.

The Chinese director based in Hong Kong and Taiwan has taken Hong Kong and Taiwan cinema to new technical and artistic heights.

“Dragon Inn” set box office records in Taiwan, Korea and the Philippines in 1967. It was subsequently selected for Cannes Classics in 2014 and 2015, as was “A Touch of Zen”.

Hailed as an “extravagantly talented visual stylist,” Hu was inspired by his love of Peking Opera. His unique style of mixing action and aesthetics has influenced directors such as Tsui Hark from Hong Kong (徐克) and Ang Lee from Taiwan (李安).

“Hu placed women in stronger and more central roles than the studio had done before and imparted a palpable sense of Buddhist precepts,” according to Janus Films, which owns the rights to “Dragon Inn” and “A Touch of Zen”.

“Hu imbued his action with a depth and maturity of composition,” the company added. “Rather than relying on special effects, he focused on the physicality of his performers.”


Director Hu (Taipei Cultural Center in New York photo)


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Chinese dragon and Islamic phoenix reunited at Louvre Abu Dhabi https://songhaizeng.com/chinese-dragon-and-islamic-phoenix-reunited-at-louvre-abu-dhabi/ https://songhaizeng.com/chinese-dragon-and-islamic-phoenix-reunited-at-louvre-abu-dhabi/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 06:00:09 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/chinese-dragon-and-islamic-phoenix-reunited-at-louvre-abu-dhabi/ Funerary figure (mingqi) caravaneer on a camel, Tang dynasty (618-907). Muhammad Yusuf, Feature Writer Louvre Abu Dhabi has announced its second international exhibition of 2021: Dragon and Phoenix – Centuries of Exchange between the Chinese and Islamic Worlds (October 6 – February 12, 2022). Organized by Louvre Abu Dhabi in partnership with the National Museum […]]]>

Funerary figure (mingqi) caravaneer on a camel, Tang dynasty (618-907).

Muhammad Yusuf, Feature Writer

Louvre Abu Dhabi has announced its second international exhibition of 2021: Dragon and Phoenix – Centuries of Exchange between the Chinese and Islamic Worlds (October 6 – February 12, 2022). Organized by Louvre Abu Dhabi in partnership with the National Museum of Asian Arts – Guimet with the support of France Muséums, the exhibition will present the cultural and artistic exchanges between Chinese and Islamic civilizations from the 8th to the 18th century.

Visitors will be able to explore cultural ties through more than 200 works of art from the collections of Louvre Abu Dhabi, the Guimet Museum and twelve museums and international institutions, as well as an extensive cultural program.


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Dragon and Phoenix brings together artefacts from two worlds rich in culture, arts and sciences: China (the dragon) and the Islamic world (the phoenix). The exhibition showcases the connections, artistic influences, and remarkable untold stories of over 800 years of trade across land and sea trade routes, from the establishment of the first Arab merchant colonies in Canton in the 8th century to the early days. 18th century.

Traveling from the Mashreq and the Arabian Peninsula through Central Asia and the Indian Ocean and to China and Vietnam, he reveals a long and rich history of mutual admiration and influence reflected in exchanges both tangible and intangible. Dragon and Phoenix aims in particular to highlight unconventional centers of artistic and cultural production. With both a physical exhibition at the museum and an online experience, it will shed light on how centuries of cultural exchange and prolific artistic production between the two worlds reveal a dominance of coveted luxury materials and works of art. between the 8th and 18th centuries.

Chinese dragon-shaped cup, Yuan dynasty (1279-1368).

The exhibition is curated by Sophie Makariou, president of the National Museum of Asian Arts – Guimet, with the support of Dr Souraya Noujaim, scientific director, conservation and management of the Louvre Abu Dhabi and Guilhem André collections. , Chief Curator of Asian and Medieval Arts at Louvre Abu Dhabi. . Highlights include a rare Yuan Dynasty (1279-1368) gold cup with a dragon-shaped hilt from China, a masterpiece from the Louvre Abu Dhabi collection that may have been made for a nomadic dignitary from northern China.

Visitors will marvel at some of the most spectacular luxury silk fabrics ever created: the so-called Panni Tartarici (or Tartar fabrics) – Mongolian silk fabric with gold threads – from the collection of the National Arts Museum Asian – Guimet, which attests to influences from other textile traditions, such as those of Iran, the Near East and Central Asia.

With over 200 artifacts spread across five sections – the first four following a historical timeline and the fifth focusing on the literary traditions of calligraphy and poetry – Dragon and Phoenix presents this story from a fluid global context of artistic exchange. and cultural in ancient times.

The exhibition presents a diversity of works of art, including paintings, silverware, ceramics, glassware, manuscripts and luxury fabrics, with an international repertoire combining Arabic epigraphy, chinoiseries, lotus, geometric decoration, dragons, phoenixes and many other fantastic bestiaries. The first section takes the visitor on a journey between the 8th and 10th centuries, when regular contact between these two civilizations is established through land and sea routes. It presents the journeys undertaken by travelers and merchants from the West, as well as these objects and techniques which are the result of these first exchanges.

dragon art 2 Dish with throne scene, Iran, late 12th – early 13th century.

The second section turns to the Song and Seljuq (11th-13th centuries) aesthetic, describing the encounters between two emerging dynasties. The aesthetics of Buddhism inspired the symbols of power in the eastern Islamic world – especially the depiction of rulers. The increased use of the Maritime Silk Road during the Song Dynasty shows how Chinese goods were exported en masse across the Indian Ocean and Red Sea by dhows – Arab merchant ships. Ceramics found on the shores of East Africa, Madagascar, but also Southeast Asia and the Philippines, testify to this trade.

The third section is devoted to the artistic interactions that took place under the Mongol dynasties (13th – 14th centuries) and their influences on the Islamic East.

This is the period that sees the emergence of the famous blue and white porcelain from the imperial kilns of Jingdezhen in China. This section highlights the use of cobalt blue imported to China from West Asia, and the aesthetic improvement brought to Chinese potters. During this period, China increased its production of luxury goods specially designed for export, to meet the demand of the Islamic world.

Called the “Gallery of Harmonious Exchanges”, the fourth section analyzes the mutually influenced artistic exchanges that took place in the 15th and 17th centuries.

From the 15th century, the Chinese imperial furnace of Jingdezhen began to imitate the forms of Islamic metallurgy such as the ewer adorned with the signs of the zodiac of Herat (Louvre Abu Dhabi). This can be seen in objects such as blue and white porcelain from the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). These imitations brought to light the phenomenon of Chinese collections of inlaid Islamic goldwork. The impact of Chinese ceramics in Vietnam as well as the artistic production of Islamic Southeast Asia are also demonstrated in this section of the exhibition. The exhibition ends with a fifth section devoted to manuscripts, poetry and calligraphy from the 8th to the 18th century.

The art of calligraphy is one of the most beloved artistic mediums of these two incredibly literate civilizations. The prestige of calligraphy in the Islamic world is intimately linked to the Koran and to copies of the sacred text. Likewise, in China, the Three Perfections – calligraphy, poetry and painting – are the tools to physically express one’s spirituality, in harmony with the Dao (code of conduct).


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Beloved story of cursed lovers returns in “Panggung Rakyat” virtual series https://songhaizeng.com/beloved-story-of-cursed-lovers-returns-in-panggung-rakyat-virtual-series/ https://songhaizeng.com/beloved-story-of-cursed-lovers-returns-in-panggung-rakyat-virtual-series/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 03:55:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/beloved-story-of-cursed-lovers-returns-in-panggung-rakyat-virtual-series/ The Panggung Rakyat series, presented by Cultural Economy Development Agency (Cendana) with the support of DBKL City Council, truly takes the place of Malaysians in terms of traditional arts and culture. Pandemic restrictions forced this “live in KL” series to go virtual, and last month’s first Panggung Rakyat show saw Kedah Mek Mulung theatrical drama, […]]]>

The Panggung Rakyat series, presented by Cultural Economy Development Agency (Cendana) with the support of DBKL City Council, truly takes the place of Malaysians in terms of traditional arts and culture. Pandemic restrictions forced this “live in KL” series to go virtual, and last month’s first Panggung Rakyat show saw Kedah Mek Mulung theatrical drama, directed by Zamzuriah Zahari, attracting an enthusiastic online audience.

The next stop in the Panggung Rakyat series is a virtual tour of Penang for an evergreen performance of the Puppet and opera by Teochewthe archives of.

In 2016, the famous Shantou, Chinese opera performer, Liu Xiaoli, performed in Teochew Puppet and Opera House’s Butterfly lover: first meeting in PenangPac, with fourth generation Chinese Traditional Opera practitioner Goh Hooi Ling. Known professionally as Ling Goh, she established the Teochew Puppet and Opera House in George Town in 2014.

So if you missed the sold-out PenangPac show back then, or just want to relive the story of those cursed lovers, you’re in luck.

On Saturday (September 11), this archival performance will be presented online via Cendana’s Facebook page. here at 8:30 p.m.

Butterfly lover, often known as “Chinese Romeo and Juliet”, is a tragic love story of a young woman who disguises herself as a man to continue her education. She ends up falling in love with another student and has to get creative in her attempts to cement the relationship with him. But theirs is a romance that cannot be, as she will later become engaged to another and her heart breaks when he hears the news.

This Teochew Puppet and Opera House show stars Liu as Zhu Yingtai and Goh as Liang Shanbo.

Teochew Puppet and the director and performer of the Opera Goh repainting opera props last December. She now runs online courses to introduce the world of Chinese opera to culture enthusiasts. Photo: The Star / Chan Boon Kai

“It’s a legendary tale, an unforgettable love story from China. It delivers a message of true love and how it always prevails, even in the face of adversity and death. It’s a spectacle that everyone should be watching, ”said Lim Chai Lin, manager of Teochew Puppet and Opera House.

In these times of pandemic, Lim adds that the Panggung Rakyat initiative now allows people to enjoy the spectacle in the comfort and safety of their own homes.

“We hope this will remind people of the beautiful story of Butterfly lover, and also the beauty of the Teochew opera, ”she adds.

Goh, 40, who is a true blue child of Chinese opera, followed in her mother’s footsteps (Toh Ai Hwa) in the world of traditional Chinese arts and practically grew up behind the scenes of Chinese opera performances in all the countries.

Despite pandemic restrictions ending live Chinese opera performances, Goh chooses to remain optimistic. But she admits she failed to welcome visitors to the Teochew Puppet and Opera House, and hopes it can reopen soon.

She also remembers the pre-pandemic days when her artist group put on around 180 performances a year, in temples for celebrations and festivals or local events and performances in Kuala Lumpur.

A file of a puppet performance at the Teochew Puppet and Opera House in George Town. A file of a puppet performance at the Teochew Puppet and Opera House in George Town.

To move forward in a sustainable way, Goh mentions that she plans to work with her group in a smaller setting.

“We had a couple of temple shows this year, but just private for the gods and our performances were cut short. We usually play for four hours, but they wanted it to be only one hour.

“When we suggested playing by video, they told us they could just use old recorded videos instead,” she says.

Goh’s group of 10 artists consists of his brother, his mother, a few relatives and family friends. Many depend solely on income from opera performances. Now, she reveals that most of them have worked as waiters and insurance agents.

For her, the Teochew Puppet and Opera House will have to adapt and will be able to welcome visitors – from near or far – online.

Goh has embraced the virtual world by offering online courses where she conducts classes in various Teochew opera skills, from vocalization and movement to drums and puppets.

Butterfly lover: first meeting is a timely reminder of the magic to be found when this resilient artist lights up the stage.

This episode of the Panggung Rakyat series will last 35 minutes. The next day (September 12), a documentary on the opera Teochew will be presented on the same platform.


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The Week Ahead – Events from September 4 to 10, 2021 – Larchmont Buzz https://songhaizeng.com/the-week-ahead-events-from-september-4-to-10-2021-larchmont-buzz/ https://songhaizeng.com/the-week-ahead-events-from-september-4-to-10-2021-larchmont-buzz/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 22:53:33 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/the-week-ahead-events-from-september-4-to-10-2021-larchmont-buzz/ The Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains exhibition opens this Friday at the Vogue Multicultural Museum in Hollywood. This time around, my goals for the Labor Day weekend are a little more relaxed than my young self would have approved. And if you’re looking for a quieter vacation yourself, you’re in luck, we’ve got enough talk […]]]>
The Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains exhibition opens this Friday at the Vogue Multicultural Museum in Hollywood.

This time around, my goals for the Labor Day weekend are a little more relaxed than my young self would have approved. And if you’re looking for a quieter vacation yourself, you’re in luck, we’ve got enough talk about art, culture, and books to stimulate your mind without all the fuss and free debauchery. There is also a really cool Pink Floyd exhibition opening and an immersive Frankenstein experience to experience…

Arts & Culture

The Pink Floyd Exhibition: Their mortal remains open this Friday September 3, and crosses January 9, 2022, to Multicultural Vogue Museum at Hollywood. Come experience this audiovisual journey in honor of the “world’s most legendary psychedelic group”, who will make their North American debut at Vogue. This traveling exhibition begins early on with the Syd Barrett years, and moves through the band’s timeline, with unreleased concert recordings, original instruments, sketches and props, and personal memorabilia, ending in a ‘ immersive listening space ”which includes a recreation of the group’s last performance in 2005. Visitors should take a scheduled reservation; tickets start at $ 46, with discounted packages available. The Multicultural Vogue Museum is located in the historic Vogue Theater in 6675 Hollywood Boulevard

This week, Great shows will present the 10 years of the global collective of bassist artists Subsuelo, to Saturday September 4th of 2 p.m.-9 p.m., with appearances by Reyna Tropical, Cumbiatón, Late Night Laggers and Los Rakas. Subsuelo started in 2011 as a house party in Boyle Heights, and is now experimenting with “futuristic dance parties and old school tropical music”. I’m intrigued – apparently they also have a live flamenco band playing traditional music cante jondo and experiences with “gender and collaborations”. This is a free event for all ages; please RSVP here.

Knight’s Books is the spot happening in Larchmont this week, with three events on the calendar. The first is a virtual event, TTuesday, September 7 of 7 pm-8pm, during which you can listen as Emily barth isler talks about his coming-of-age novel Consequences. Free with RSVP; buy a signed copy of the book here.

Then another virtual gathering, Wednesday September 8 of 7 pm-8pm, when Brant Cooper talks about his book Proof of disruption: empowering people. Create value. Drive change. This NY Times CEO and bestselling author “teaches leaders how to empower people and their organizations to create new value and become more resilient, aware and dynamic.” Free webinar with RSVP; pre-order a copy of the book with signed ex-libris here.

And finally for that of Chevalier, on Thursday September 9 of 7 pm-8pm, Dr Donnelly Wilkes will talk about his book, Code Red Fallujah: Memoirs of a Doctor at War, the author’s first-hand account of his role in the Battle of Fallujah. (The stores website still posting this as an in-person event, but would come back to check for updates.)

Finally, to complement the arts and culture, LACMA presents a virtual event, Art and Conversation: Qiu Anxiong in Legacies of Exchange, to Wednesday, September 8 of 6 pm-7pm Join the Chinese artist Qiu Anxiong and LACMA curator Susanna Ferrell as they discuss the artist’s work, The skeptic, in the exhibition <Legacies of Exchange: Contemporary Chinese Art from the Yuz Foundation. Qiu creates through the media (animation, painting, installations), with most of his works “centered on the relationships between humans, animals and the environment”. His pieces have been seen in major museums around the world, including MoMA, the Met, Kunst Haus Zurich, MoCA Tokyo, and the Hong Kong Museum of Art. Qiu currently lives and works in Shanghai. This event is free with RSVP.

Food and fun

If you’re a Marvel nerd like me, you’re probably excited to see its latest and best, so why not take your excitement a step further and watch it in one of Hollywood’s coolest old theaters. The captain will present the new Marvel movie, Shang-Chi and the legend of the ten rings, from now on, Friday September 3, with daily screenings through Sunday September 19. Tickets are $ 20 for adults and $ 16 for children (3-11) and seniors (60+).

And summer movie nights keep rolling in Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel to Monday September 6, with a special Labor Day edition of Tropicana movie night. Float in Hockney’s painted pool or curl up on a loveseat for two as you share a bag of free popcorn and enjoy a screening of La La Land of 8:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Tickets are $ 16 to $ 52 and are still available, but don’t wait! Tickets are sold per table, not per person, and are free for hotel guests. Advance purchase required. Bonus: dress in the movie theme and get a free cocktail or candy. The full bar and food menu are available until 9:45 p.m.

Additionally, just in time for the holiday weekend, LA Rec and Parks today announced the extension of the summer swimming season until September 26 at selected sites, including Pan-Pacific Park. Seasonal swimming pools will be open from 1- 5:00 p.m. to Saturdays and Sundays. The facilities will be open all year round from Monday to Sunday. Weekday hours vary by location. For the full list of open pool sites, see the link above. Also note that all “aquatic facilities will continue to follow COVID-19 guidelines and protocol for staff and guest safety.”

Health

I have to admit I’m a little dizzy when I find something different for HealthDTLA LINE will welcome The Class – September Series, every Saturday all month, from this Saturday September 4th of 10 am-11am This “cathartic, music-based, mat-based training experience” will combine guided instructions and carefully curated playlists, with familiar exercises like squats and lunges (so nothing crazy). The aim is to “strengthen the body while noticing the spirit, in an effort to restore balance through mental cleansing and emotional release.” Class will take place outside on the roof of ROW DTLA, with plenty of space for social distancing. Tickets are $ 45; be sure to bring your own water, towel and mat.

History and community

The Downtown repertory theater company is back to Heritage Square Museum, this Friday Saturday and Sunday 3-5 September, with It’s alive! An intimate immersive Frankenstein experience. Set in Mary Shelley’s “grieved and guilty mind”, you will be separated from the people you came with by meeting the poets and radicals of Mary’s inner circle. You may also be asked to dig a grave or hold a cut tongue, so you will probably want to wear your most comfortable grave digging shoes and clothing. There will be two performances per evening, with a limit of 22 spectators per show and a mask mandate for indoor scenes. Proof of vaccination or negative Covid test within 48 hours. is also required. The first show: 7:30 p.m.> (all ages); the late show: 9:15 p.m. (21 years old and over), tickets for the last show, free drinks; Cost: $ 55 to $ 60 (Limited tickets are still available, but probably not for long!) Warning: the play will feature scenes of death, suicide and self-dismemberment. Heritage Square is a living history museum, open for exterior tours on Saturday and Sunday, 11 am-5pm, with free parking on site.

And on a more serious note, as we approach the anniversary of a very tragic day, the LA Holocaust Museum organize a virtual event, Building Bridges: How 9/11 Changed Us Forever, Thursday September 9 To 5:00 p.m. Engage with leaders of New land, a Judeo-Muslim partnership for change, 30 years later, an Iranian-American Jewish organization, the Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles, and the USC Shoah Foundation for “a discussion of the legacy of the 9/11 attacks, the impact of 9/11 on native communities in the Middle East and Central Asia, and how they can work together to fight hatred and bigotry. “. This is a free webinar; Please register here.

Local government

Grand Wilshire Neighborhood CouncilThe Grand Wilshire Neighborhood Council continues this week with two more virtual meetings. The first is the Awareness committee to Saturday September 4th of 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Click on here for details and supporting documents. And then in the middle of the week, they have their monthly general Council Meet, Wednesday September 8> from 6.30 p.m. – 9.30 p.m. Click on here for details and supporting documents.

The other local neighborhood council, West city center, will also meet this week on Thursday September 9 of 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. for the Outreach and Civic Engagement Committee Meet. Click on here for details and meeting agenda.

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Hong Kong’s top singer loses concert hall amid crackdown https://songhaizeng.com/hong-kongs-top-singer-loses-concert-hall-amid-crackdown/ https://songhaizeng.com/hong-kongs-top-singer-loses-concert-hall-amid-crackdown/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 07:13:05 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/hong-kongs-top-singer-loses-concert-hall-amid-crackdown/ HONG KONG – A popular Hong Kong singer and pro-democracy activist will not be allowed to perform at any of the city’s top theaters later this month, indicating that a crackdown by authorities on dissent has reached the entertainment and culture scene. The Hong Kong Arts Center cited a public safety clause in canceling Denise […]]]>

HONG KONG – A popular Hong Kong singer and pro-democracy activist will not be allowed to perform at any of the city’s top theaters later this month, indicating that a crackdown by authorities on dissent has reached the entertainment and culture scene.

The Hong Kong Arts Center cited a public safety clause in canceling Denise Ho’s room reservations for her concerts, according to a statement posted on Facebook Wednesday by the singer’s company, Goomusic.

The cancellation came days after pro-Beijing newspaper Ta Kung Pao accused Ho of being “anti-China” because of his involvement in the 2019 pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong. Ho is an outspoken activist and participated in large protests during the city’s Umbrella Movement in 2014 and later in 2019 that aimed to protect Hong Kong’s long-standing civil liberties from Chinese interference. continental.

“One can’t help but wonder how the Hong Kong Arts Center, as an independent institution supporting contemporary art that has existed for 44 years, can now arbitrarily suspend contracts without substantial evidence? Goomusic said.

A d

The Hong Kong Arts Center did not immediately comment.

Ho’s sold-out concerts were scheduled for September 8-12.

The cancellation has fueled fears that Hong Kong’s thriving cultural scene, which in the past was known for its free speech, could be the latest target as Beijing tightens its control over the city.

Over the past year, authorities in Hong Kong have arrested dozens of pro-democracy activists and passed electoral reforms that would reduce the number of directly elected lawmakers in the city.

Critics have accused authorities in Beijing and Hong Kong of limiting the freedoms promised to the city when it was handed over by the British to mainland China in 1997.

According to Goomusic, the Hong Kong Arts Center canceled the reservation under a clause stating that it could terminate the reservation of a place if the person renting the place did not abide by the terms and conditions in circumstances where “l public order or public safety would be endangered. . “

A d

Ho’s company said the Hong Kong Arts Center told Goomusic representatives that it was “obliged to closely observe recent developments in the company.”

Ho’s company said it will reimburse ticket buyers and the singer will broadcast her concert live instead on September 12.

“We may face constraints in performance venues, but the stage itself is not limited by boundaries,” Goomusic said.

The cancellation came days after Hong Kong director Kiwi Chow was fined 5,000 Hong Kong dollars ($ 640) for allegedly flouting coronavirus restrictions at a private film screening .

Chow, who directed the films “Ten Years” and “Revolution of our Times” on the city’s democratic movement, held a private screening of his film “Beyond the Dream” last week.

Authorities raided the screening and accused attendees of flouting social distancing rules, as public gatherings in Hong Kong are currently limited to four people.

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Chow said the private screening was limited to friends only, telling a local radio show that he would not pay the fine and take the case to court instead. The city’s social distancing restrictions do not apply to private gatherings.

Separately, seven pro-democracy activists were sentenced Wednesday to between 11 and 16 months in prison for an unauthorized rally during the 2019 anti-government protests.

The seven activists, including lawyer Albert Ho and Figo Chan, head of the dissolved Civil Front for Human Rights, pleaded guilty to charges, including organizing and inciting to participate in the meeting not authorized of October 20, 2019.

Of the seven, only one – Raphael Wong of the League of Social Democrats political party – was not already serving a prison sentence.

The other six were sentenced earlier for other unauthorized gatherings.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


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Marina Times – Marvel martial arts legend fights from San Francisco to China https://songhaizeng.com/marina-times-marvel-martial-arts-legend-fights-from-san-francisco-to-china/ https://songhaizeng.com/marina-times-marvel-martial-arts-legend-fights-from-san-francisco-to-china/#respond Sat, 28 Aug 2021 06:35:35 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/marina-times-marvel-martial-arts-legend-fights-from-san-francisco-to-china/ A magical mash-up from start to finish, Shang-Chi and the legend of the ten rings casts a kinetic jubilant spell. This brilliant and daring Pacific Rim adventure features a high-octane, high-stakes hero journey with jaw-dropping martial arts action, pop-up comedy, and hectic family drama that spans the streets of San Francisco to the exotic Macau. […]]]>

A magical mash-up from start to finish, Shang-Chi and the legend of the ten rings casts a kinetic jubilant spell. This brilliant and daring Pacific Rim adventure features a high-octane, high-stakes hero journey with jaw-dropping martial arts action, pop-up comedy, and hectic family drama that spans the streets of San Francisco to the exotic Macau. Additionally, it officially kicks off the final phase of Marvel Studios’ remarkably interwoven blockbusters and superhero TV shows with a number of ties to previous and upcoming films and series. Yet like the huge box office success Black Panther, you don’t need any prior knowledge of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (aka the MCU) or comic book canon to enjoy it. Directed and co-written by Destin Daniel Cretton (Short term 12, Just mercy), Shang Chi stands out easily as a multi-generational showdown between good and evil, propelled by a cavalcade of exaggerated fight scenes and embellished with modern, funky humor.

Shang-Chi was created in the 1970s as Marvel Comics’ master kung fu to complement the rise of martial arts sensation Bruce Lee and the proliferation of dubiously-labeled Hong Kong films. “Chop-socky” – those who featured Lee and those who didn’t. But even though Shang-Chi has become an afterthought in the pages of comics, this cinematic style of directing has endured in Asia, especially with the addition of period witchcraft elements adapted from Chinese myth. Elegantly appointed and richly costumed adventures such as Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon and hero would bring prestige and critical acclaim to the broader genre. Meanwhile, Jackie Chan has grown into an international star with a comedic, daredevil take on this film brand, marked by its jaw-dropping stunt work and playfully wacky characterizations. And deadly sword-wielding ninjas, both solo and in packs, have begun to appear in a variety of thrillers around the world with increasing frequency. You could argue that all of this sets the stage for Shang-Chi’s big screen debut in Marvel’s first Asian-led superhero film.

CALLS OF DESTINY FROM ALL OVER THE SEA

Simu Liu – whose acting breakthrough was as the adorable lazy son Jung on the popular sitcom Kim’s convenience – is the main objective of Shang-Chi. Relying on the innate affability and decency he brought to Jung’s character, Liu absolutely shines as Shang-Chi, whom his San Francisco friends call Shaun. He’s a guy who parks cars in a fancy hotel to pay the rent and after work gets hammered in karaoke bars with his best friend and fellow valet Katy (the hilarious and mocking Awkwafina of Crazy Rich Asians and the TV series Nora from Queens). Unknown to his friends in San Francisco, Shaun’s life began in an ocean in China where he and his sister (Meng’er Zhang) were raised by two very powerful people: Jiang Li, a woman with a strange connection to the natural forces, and Wenwu, a deadly Chinese warlord and gang leader who turned away from the dark side and gave up his supernatural weapons – the film’s 10 title rings – upon marriage and fatherhood. Then, Jiang Li’s death brought Wenwu back to his ways of bargaining for power.

Despite a childhood dominated by an education that would prepare him to enter the family business, Shang-Chi had no desire to be the heir to the criminal empire of Wenwu. Instead, the young man fled to America, specifically the Bay Town, where he and Katy are attacked by Wenwu’s men at the start of the film. This encounter happens on a runaway 1-California Muni bus, and it’s just the first in a parade of stunning action sequences that are so original and seemingly death-defying that Jackie Chan would be proud of them. As the bus speeds up and over Nob Hill and eventually hurtles down Bay Street, Shang-Chi engages in close quarters combat, instinctively using seats, handrails, doors, and the fighting skills he learned when he was a child to gain the advantage over his attackers. A subsequent clash between Shang-Chi and some ninjas, with Katy caught between them, occurs on scaffolding attached to the side of a skyscraper, several stories above the ground. Like the crash on 1-California, it’s really exciting. And things only get crazier and more mystical when Shang-Chi and Katy find themselves in Macau, the starting point of a quest to find a secret village and a fortress inhabited by mythical creatures.

Here, we learn about Wenwu’s blueprint and how it could undermine Shang-Chi’s chosen path as well as expand control of the Ten Rings beyond China’s borders. Rather than being a one-note villain, Wenwu is a complex creation. His emotions and motivations resonate with Tony Leung, whose career as one of Hong Kong’s most revered and versatile men spans the magnificent romance of Wong Kar-Wai. Leaving for Love sinister and gritty crime thriller Hellish affairs to martial arts fantasy hero to the bio-photo The great master. His physical gifts and passion are fully exposed in Shang-Chi, especially during a clash between Wenwu and Jiang Li (Fala Chen) which is performed with a ballet grace reminiscent of the dreamlike and elegantly staged forest sequences of Zhang Yimou in hero.

BEYOND THE COMPETITION

Aside from Leung’s talent and Liu’s jovial relationship with Awkwafina, the cast also greatly benefits from the presence of Michelle Yeoh – the royalty of Chinese cinema whose transition to English-language films (Tomorrow never dies, Milkshakes with powder, and others) and TV shows (Star Trek: Discovery, The witcher, and more) was effortless. Yeoh’s ironic and nimble turn as Shang-Chi’s aunt is a welcome addition, as are supporting players Ben Kingsley and Benedict Wong, whose longtime Marvelite characters will recognize and applaud.

Although Hasbro GI Joe the film franchise beat it in the market with the recent release of the martial arts themed film Snake-eyes, Shang-Chi is much better in every way: storytelling, actors, special effects and cinematography. There is little competition between the two films when it comes to the crucial aspect of how the main sets and more intimate fight scenes are shot. No shaky cameras or confusing quick cut undermine the logic of the fight sequences in Shang-Chi.

The last act of Shang-Chi is crowded to the point of being crowded and frantic, but all of the above is so crisp or mind-blowing and, in Liu and Awkwafina’s case, so charming and cheerful that it doesn’t hamper the overall experience. Plus, it’s followed by a mid-credits and end-credits scene worth seeing. Yes, there’s Easter-eggy Marvel fan service here, and there are references to what has happened before and what could happen soon in the ten-plus-year-old movie saga. Corn Shang-Chi and the legend of the ten rings is one of the best origin stories in the MCU, which makes it a great place to jump into the fray if you want to.

Shang-Chi and the legend of the ten rings opens in theaters across the Bay Area on September 3.

Michael Snyder is a print and broadcast journalist who covers pop culture on Michael Snyder’s cultural explosion, Going through GABNet.net, Roku, Spotify and YouTube, and The Mark Thompson Show on KGO radio. You can follow Michael on Twitter: @cultureblaster


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Hung Liu, Artist Who Mixed East and West, Dies at 73 https://songhaizeng.com/hung-liu-artist-who-mixed-east-and-west-dies-at-73/ https://songhaizeng.com/hung-liu-artist-who-mixed-east-and-west-dies-at-73/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 17:40:50 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/hung-liu-artist-who-mixed-east-and-west-dies-at-73/ Hung Liu, a Chinese-American artist whose work fused past and present, East and West, earning praise in her adopted country and censorship in her homeland, has died August 7 at his home in Oakland, California. She was 73 years old. . The cause was pancreatic cancer, the Nancy Hoffman Gallery, which represents Ms. Liu in […]]]>

Hung Liu, a Chinese-American artist whose work fused past and present, East and West, earning praise in her adopted country and censorship in her homeland, has died August 7 at his home in Oakland, California. She was 73 years old. .

The cause was pancreatic cancer, the Nancy Hoffman Gallery, which represents Ms. Liu in New York City, said in a statement.

His death came less than three weeks before the scheduled opening of a career inquiry, “Hung Liu: Portraits of Promised Lands,” at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington. She was the first Asian American woman to have a solo exhibition there.

“A five thousand year old culture on my back; the world of the late twentieth century in my face ”is how Ms. Liu described her arrival in the United States from China in 1984, when she was 36 years old. and already an accomplished painter. Her goal in America, she once said, was “to invent a way to allow me to practice as a Chinese artist outside of a Chinese culture.”

As she quickly learned, one of the issues with being a Chinese artist outside of China was the need to manage and counter cultural expectations. Its very name automatically evoked, for many Western viewers, associations with traditional but stereotypical “Eastern” art forms such as calligraphy and brush-and-ink painting. Moreover, at that time, before the arrival of the wave of globalist art in the 1990s, the art world in Europe and the United States had little awareness of the very existence of Chinese art. contemporary.

His work incorporated photographic images that combined the political and the personal. Many of these images represented forgotten figures in history: workers, immigrants, prisoners, prostitutes. In some cases, she has represented them surrounded by flowers. There were also portraits of her Chinese family, including that of her father, taken from a snapshot that she herself had taken during her visit to a labor camp.

His 1988 painting “Resident Alien”, which has become the most widely reproduced, is a wall representation of his Green Card. It includes a realistically rendered self portrait, but the identifying name on the card has been changed to “Cookie, Fortune” and the year of birth from 1948 to 1984, the year she immigrated.

Hung Liu was born on February 17, 1948 in Changchun, northeast China, during the revolutionary era. When she was a child, her father, a teacher, was jailed for her involvement in anti-Communist politics. During the Cultural Revolution, she herself was sent by the government to the countryside to work on farms for “re-education”. There, she secretly photographed and sketched the daily life of the village.

She also traveled to China, visiting historic sites and, using a pocket paint box, making copies, among other things, of wall paintings carved and painted by Buddhist monks from the 5th to the 14th centuries in the Dunhuang Caves, in the far west of Gansu. Province.

In the 1970s, she studied at Beijing Teachers College and the Central Academy of Fine Arts. In 1981, she obtained a graduate degree from the Central Academy of Fine Arts, where she specialized and taught mural painting.

Agitated by the style and subjects of officially sanctioned socialist realism, she repeatedly asked the Chinese government for a passport to travel to the United States. When the permission finally arrived in 1984, she flew to California and enrolled in the Master of Fine Arts program at the University of California at San Diego.

One of his teachers there was conceptual artist Allan Kaprow, who had a long knowledge of Asian art and viewed both art and culture as ductile categories. His presence ensured a welcoming environment for his goals.

After obtaining a residency at the Capp Street Project, an art space and an artist residency in San Francisco, in 1988, Ms. Liu settled permanently in the Bay Area. In 1990, she began a long teaching career at Mills College in Oakland. She retired in 2014.

Her first exhibition in the United States, in 1985, consisted of drawings she brought with her from Dunhuang murals, but the work she started producing in California was quite different.

Its political content became more emphatic following the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989. In a multimedia installation from that year, “Trauma,” the cut-out silhouette of a woman in traditional Chinese dresses with her feet tied, floats on the wall above the body of a fallen student. The black silhouette of Mao Zedong’s face hangs on the wall between them. The ground below is splattered with blood-red paint.

In 1994, for the MH de Young Memorial Museum in San Francisco, Ms. Liu made an installation commemorating Chinese immigrants who died during the construction of the western section of the transcontinental railroad. In the 2000s, she began to work extensively with non-Chinese sources, basing a series of paintings on documentary images of the American photographer’s Great Depression. Dorothy Lange. The scenes of the rural misery of Dust Bowl captured by Lange reminded her of those she had witnessed and recorded in drawings, as she lived among the poor in rural China.

Most of Ms. Liu’s paintings were done in a brush version of the realistic style in which she was trained. But, skeptical of any claim to the veracity of the portrayal of history, she regularly covered the surface of her paintings with linseed oil washes, which sent streams of transparent liquid running down the canvas. This formal effect has given rise to various interpretations: fuzzy memory, tears, reality as an illusion.

Ms. Liu has presented several institutional exhibitions in the United States, including the 2013 retrospective “Summoning the Ghosts: The Art of Hung Liu”, organized by the Oakland Museum of California and which has traveled nationwide. The exhibition “Hung Liu: Golden Gate” is currently on display at the De Young Museum. The National Portrait Gallery exhibition, which runs until May 30, 2022, is his first major exhibition on the East Coast.

In 2008, as China relaxed culturally, Ms. Liu was treated to a retrospective at the Xin Beijing Gallery. But a 2019 investigation scheduled for the UCCA Contemporary Art Center in Beijing was abruptly canceled by the Chinese government, even after it granted its request to remove pieces which, in light of protests in favor of democracy in Hong Kong, were considered inflammatory.

Ms. Liu is survived by her husband, critic and curator Jeff Kelley; one son, Lingchen Kelley; and a grandson.

In addition to her paintings, Ms. Liu has made a few permanent public works, including “Going Away, Coming Home,” a 160-foot-long mural installed at Oakland International Airport. It is made entirely of glass windows painted with images derived from a 12th-century Chinese paint roller: dozens of ethereal flying white cranes, traditional Chinese symbols of good fortune.

The image is one of the most poetic created by an artist who wrote, in “Ghosts / Seventy Portraits”, a collection of her work in 2020: “When I moved to the West, there was exactly one half. life, I carried my ghosts with me.The ghosts that I carry are a burden, but also a blessing.


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Chinese actor banned after visit to Japanese shrine in Yasukuni harms national emotion https://songhaizeng.com/chinese-actor-banned-after-visit-to-japanese-shrine-in-yasukuni-harms-national-emotion/ https://songhaizeng.com/chinese-actor-banned-after-visit-to-japanese-shrine-in-yasukuni-harms-national-emotion/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 03:10:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/chinese-actor-banned-after-visit-to-japanese-shrine-in-yasukuni-harms-national-emotion/ Zhang Zhehan Photo: VCG A Chinese actor who posed for photos at the famous Japanese Yasukuni shrine has been forced to quit the entertainment industry as more mainstream platforms remove his films and television works, variety shows and music from from Sunday. All movies and drama series in which Zhang Zhehan has appeared, such as […]]]>

Zhang Zhehan Photo: VCG

A Chinese actor who posed for photos at the famous Japanese Yasukuni shrine has been forced to quit the entertainment industry as more mainstream platforms remove his films and television works, variety shows and music from from Sunday.

All movies and drama series in which Zhang Zhehan has appeared, such as Demon girl and Word of honor, have been removed from Chinese online video platforms. It seems that Zhang has never been on these platforms before.

The episodes that Zhang, 30, had played on reality shows Everybody is ready and Keep running not found at time of publication. On the Bilibili video sharing platform, only news videos about him could be found.

The search for “Zhang Zhehan” on the Mango TV video platform returns “the person does not exist”. Chinese netizens also discovered that scenes of Zhang in a historical drama Nirvana on fire have been removed as they are now broadcast on Shandong TV.

Music platforms, including QQ Music and NetEase Music, have deleted all of his music and even deleted his personal profile.

The Internet boycott of Zhang came after the China Performing Arts Association issued a notice on August 15, urging the industry to ban Zhang, claiming that Zhang’s highly inappropriate behavior not only harms emotion. national, but also has a bad influence on the adolescents who follow it.

On August 19, the China Federation of Radio and Television Associations held a seminar, calling on radio and television and production institutes to adopt zero tolerance against actors who violate laws and lack ethics.

Photos circulating on social media show Zhang posing at the Yasukuni Shrine, which honors some of Japan’s top war criminals. There were also photos of Zhang attending a wedding ceremony at Nogi Shrine, another infamous shrine that honors Japanese Imperial military officers who invaded China during World War II.

Zhang apologized online for his ignorance, which did not prevent the boycott and termination of his business partnerships. All corporate brands that had supported him had ended their cooperation with him, such as beverage company Wahaha, Jewel Pandora brand and Shanghai Mercury Home Textile fabric brand.

Last week, Chinese streaming site Youku removed Zhang’s name from the cast of its martial arts TV series. Word of honor. The video-sharing platform Douyin announced that it had deleted Zhang’s account.

World time


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Chinese market turns freezing for Taiwanese pounds, as tensions rise https://songhaizeng.com/chinese-market-turns-freezing-for-taiwanese-pounds-as-tensions-rise/ https://songhaizeng.com/chinese-market-turns-freezing-for-taiwanese-pounds-as-tensions-rise/#respond Wed, 11 Aug 2021 04:38:52 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/chinese-market-turns-freezing-for-taiwanese-pounds-as-tensions-rise/ TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) – Taiwanese author Iris Chiang hardly appears to be the type whose work is reportedly banned from publication in China. Yet, four years after being sold to a Chinese publisher, his book on teaching children to appreciate art is still not in press, a victim of heightened tensions between China and Taiwan […]]]>

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) – Taiwanese author Iris Chiang hardly appears to be the type whose work is reportedly banned from publication in China. Yet, four years after being sold to a Chinese publisher, his book on teaching children to appreciate art is still not in press, a victim of heightened tensions between China and Taiwan which spill over into the cultural sphere.

It’s not just about losing access to the huge Chinese market, say the authors and publishers. It is also about losing opportunities to exchange and connect, after three decades of growing contact between the two. In recent years, China has reduced the flow of Chinese tourists and students to Taiwan and has barred its performers from competing in Taiwan’s Golden Rooster and Golden Melody Awards, considered the Oscars and Grammys for film and music in Chinese language.

“We have the impression that in these few years, trade flows are diverging. Taiwan is going further in one direction and China is going further in one direction, ”said James Chao, director of China Times Publishing Group, one of Taiwan’s largest publishers. “It’s getting farther and farther away. ”

China claims Taiwan, an autonomous island located about 160 kilometers (100 miles) from the east coast of China, as its territory. The election of Tsai Ing-wen, pro-Taiwan’s current de facto independence, as president of the island in 2016, ushered in a period of deteriorating relations. China has tried to isolate the island diplomatically and to exert pressure militarily.

While the ruling Communist Party in China has long banned books on sensitive issues ranging from religion to the lives of Chinese political leaders, Taiwanese publishers previously sold a wide variety of other books on the mainland, relying on a common language and cultural history.

“Exchanges in publishing are really exchanges of ideas,” said Linden Lin, director of Linking Publishing Co. in Taiwan. “It is only by publishing that we can have this type of exchange.

Now any Taiwanese book has become more difficult to publish in China, according to editors, academics, publishers and authors. This is not a blanket ban, and publishers blame the self-censorship of their mainland counterparts rather than any official order.

Titles that were frozen include a Taiwanese-Japanese fusion cookbook, self-help book, and travel sketchbook by a Taiwanese artist in Beijing that featured cats roaming traditional “hutong” neighborhoods. ” from the city.

A sticking point is any content that suggests a distinct Taiwanese identity. Young Taiwanese in particular have developed a distinct identity. A 2020 poll found that two-thirds of those polled did not consider themselves Chinese.

“In the past, they censored books on religion. … But for example, if the subject of a book is Taiwanese food, that’s okay, ”said Rosine Liu, editor of Taiwan’s Business Weekly, which previously sold two cookbooks by one author. Taiwanese in China. “But now I feel like if it’s called ‘Taiwan Cuisine’, it’s even a little stressful. “

The soft-spoken Chang thought she would market her book, “Play with Art,” to prosperous parents in China, where the government was encouraging many to have more children – a fact she learned from. one of his mainland students.

Things went well with the Chinese publisher at first. At their request, she agreed to modify a chapter that used examples from art museums in Taiwan. A Chinese writer would substitute a chapter based on museums in China.

Then the other side fell silent, she said. When contacted over a year later, she was told the review process was slower than normal.

“After we got a new president, the response from the other side – the harshness of the situation and the lack of friendship – created a lot of tedious things that made the exchange impractical,” Chiang said.

This contrasts sharply with the 1980s and 1990s, when Chinese readers were drawn to Taiwanese writers such as Lung Ying-tai, whose essays contributed to the debate over Taiwan’s transformation from a one-party regime to democracy. Sanmao, a Taiwanese writer who wrote stories about her life in the Sahara Desert, won over an entire generation of Chinese women.

There was also curiosity about the most basic things, after the two were cut off for decades after their separation in 1949 during a civil war in China.

“At the time, relations were good and it seemed like there was a vibe in China that they really wanted to understand Taiwan,” Chiang said. “What kind of fruit do you guys eat?” How is your art? How is your life How to celebrate the new year? These little things in life.

Now, Taiwanese are also sensitive to the heightened tensions, highlighted by the debate last year over a children’s book from China. “Until Daddy Comes Home,” about a boy whose father was out of town during the Lunar New Year holidays to treat COVID-19 patients, paints a rosy picture of the efforts of the China to fight the pandemic.

Some in Taiwan have argued that China is using the island’s open environment to spread propaganda. But a government proposal to control the mainland’s books has drawn criticism that the island is relapsing into authoritarian habits.

“If we say we are afraid that people will see fake news, that I will help them filter the information… then how can you call it democracy? said Lai Hsiang-wai, professor of press freedom at the National Taiwan University of the Arts.

The government dropped the proposal, saying it would only censor books published by the Communist Party or its army, the People’s Liberation Army.

Liu, the editor, said it was never a purely commercial exchange for her. She enjoyed meeting her mainland counterparts at book fairs and learning about their way of doing things. In the current political climate, those very basic human moments of exchange that had helped people bond with each other are gone.

“For me, in this difficult environment, you will also shrink, because this kind of cooperation is reciprocal,” Liu said. “Because at the end of the day, we all still carry that burden of country and that burden of history.”


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