Chinese Arts – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ Tue, 24 May 2022 23:18:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://songhaizeng.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-138x136.png Chinese Arts – Song Haizeng http://songhaizeng.com/ 32 32 The story of a Yukon Chinese who opened the territory’s first supermarket marks Asian Heritage Month https://songhaizeng.com/the-story-of-a-yukon-chinese-who-opened-the-territorys-first-supermarket-marks-asian-heritage-month/ Tue, 24 May 2022 21:30:22 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/the-story-of-a-yukon-chinese-who-opened-the-territorys-first-supermarket-marks-asian-heritage-month/ An exhibit featuring the story of a prominent Chinese-Yukon businessman who opened the territory’s first supermarket was one of the signature events co-sponsored by the U.S. Consulate General and Hidden Histories Society Yukon on May 19 to celebrate Asian Heritage Month. Bruce Sung was born and raised in Vancouver’s Chinatown. His first venture out of […]]]>

An exhibit featuring the story of a prominent Chinese-Yukon businessman who opened the territory’s first supermarket was one of the signature events co-sponsored by the U.S. Consulate General and Hidden Histories Society Yukon on May 19 to celebrate Asian Heritage Month.

Bruce Sung was born and raised in Vancouver’s Chinatown. His first venture out of Chinatown was catering for the United States Army and Navy in Prince Rupert, British Columbia during World War II. He also took care of different crews that were building the Alaska Highway.

From there he moved to Whitehorse in the 1960s where he opened a hotel, the first supermarket, and also added square footage where the Hudson’s Bay Company was a major tenant.

At the time, it was not easy to be Chinese, says his son Bob Sung.

Having his father’s story told “like a to-do list”

“Dad was much more accepted here [in Whitehorse] being Asian rather than in Chinatown, because, you know, Vancouver was a big Chinese community and indeed there was a lot of racial profiling and he was the recipient of all that profiling,” Bob said.

Then Chinatowns in North America were ghettos for Chinese communities because of the “colonial attitude,” Bob explained.

There was also a head tax for people coming from China which ranged from $50 to $500 between 1885 and 1923. It is estimated that around 82,000 Chinese paid the fee until the Exclusion Act came into effect in 1923, effectively banning all new immigration from China until 1947.

Bob’s paternal grandfather came to Canada during the head tax era; however, his family was exempt from paying him as he worked as a translator for newcomers.

“Dad never had to pay the head tax, but nonetheless, they were still Chinese,” Bob said.

Despite the challenges, Bob’s father, Bruce, managed to become a successful businessman.

Now Bob is happy to see recent efforts to uncover the history of people of color.

He said his father’s story told at the exhibit was a unique moment for him.

“It’s like a to-do list that I’ll never see again,” he said. “Just having the community see and recognize my dad is just a treat. I’m just blown away.”

The unveiling of the Hidden Stories exhibit was part of a series of events to celebrate Asian Heritage Month sponsored by the US Consulate General in Vancouver, which covers both British Columbia and the Yukon.

Bringing cultures together through music

As part of the programming, the United States Consulate has partnered with the Arts Envoy Program of the Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs to also present Pipeline Vocal Project, an all-female a capella trio from Alaska.

The group, made up of Lisa Hawkins, Adriana Latonio and Molly Dieni, gave musical masterclasses to Whitehorse residents and hosted several performances May 19-22.

The Pipeline Vocal Project a capella trio performed at the Whitehorse United Church on Saturday, May 21 to celebrate Asian Heritage Month. From right to left are Lisa Hawkins, Molly Dieni and Adriana Latonio. (Sissi De Flaviis/CBC)

Latonio, the band’s soprano, said growing up as an Asian American in Anchorage, Alaska was isolating.

“I felt like I didn’t really fit in with anybody there,” she said. “I look different. I was the only one with brown skin and had different facial features and brought different foods that the other kids thought were weird and gross.”

Part of the band’s mission is to bring different cultures together through music, Dieni said.

During their Saturday concert, the group included an international segment where the trio sang songs from around the world and in different languages ​​including English, Japanese, Urdu and Spanish.

“I feel like it’s wonderful to be an advocate for younger generations to say that being Asian can kind of be a superpower for you,” Latonio said.

It was the trio’s first time performing in Canada.

Cultural month is celebrated in Canada and the United States and is an opportunity to highlight the contributions of people of Asian descent to North American society.

Angela Girard, head of public diplomacy at the consulate, said the visit was a chance to strengthen Canada-US relations in the Arctic.

“We kind of took this opportunity to really celebrate the idea of ​​diversity, equity and inclusion and how we can celebrate that in both of our countries,” she said.

Girard added that it was also a chance to connect the arts and cultures of the Yukon and Alaska.

This is the first time in two years that there are in-person events to celebrate Asian Heritage Month in the Yukon.

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Valuable joint education in China-US cooperation (Envoy) https://songhaizeng.com/valuable-joint-education-in-china-us-cooperation-envoy/ Sat, 21 May 2022 06:26:06 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/valuable-joint-education-in-china-us-cooperation-envoy/ Chinese Ambassador to the United States Qin Gang delivers a video address at the first graduation ceremony of the Juilliard School of the Tianjin Conservatory of Music on May 20, 2022. [Photo/us.china-embassy.gov.cn] China’s ambassador to the United States on Friday delivered a video address at the Juilliard School’s first graduation ceremony at the Tianjin Conservatory […]]]>

Chinese Ambassador to the United States Qin Gang delivers a video address at the first graduation ceremony of the Juilliard School of the Tianjin Conservatory of Music on May 20, 2022. [Photo/us.china-embassy.gov.cn]

China’s ambassador to the United States on Friday delivered a video address at the Juilliard School’s first graduation ceremony at the Tianjin Conservatory of Music and the 2022 graduation ceremony at Duke Kunshan University. , which is also the university’s first class of undergraduate students.

He hailed that the China-US joint colleges and universities are valuable attempts at educational cooperation and communication between China and the United States, encouraging students to promote international people-to-people exchanges and become ambassadors of friendship.

The Juilliard Graduate School, Tianjin Conservatory of Music, is the first and only foreign branch of the Juilliard School in New York and was established in November 2015. It is the first art school in China to award the American master’s degree. Located in the Yujiapu Free Zone in Tianjin, China, The Juilliard School has become a cultural hub of performance, practice, research, interactive exhibits, and public service.

In his online speech at the graduation ceremony of the Juilliard Graduate School, Tianjin Conservatory of Music, Qin Gang stressed that the school is a high-quality Chinese-American cooperative institution, which has cultivated musical talents and high-level international artists and made a fruitful contribution to the promotion of mutual appreciation of the arts and humanistic exchanges between the two countries.

To the first students to graduate from the Juilliard School, Ambassador Qin said that they are not only outstanding talents nurtured by China-US educational exchanges, but will soon also become artistic ambassadors to promote communication and understanding between China and the world. During these past two years of the COVID pandemic, students have experienced trials and tribulations, reaped the power of growth, and gained a deeper understanding of the interconnectedness of human destiny.

Qin expressed his hope that, standing at the starting point of graduation, in the face of a still complex and uncertain world, students would remain independent and determined and strive to become “global artists” with artistic standards. standards and a sense of social responsibility.

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Chinese Vice Premier Liu appeases tech firms, backs overseas listings https://songhaizeng.com/chinese-vice-premier-liu-appeases-tech-firms-backs-overseas-listings/ Wed, 18 May 2022 01:24:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/chinese-vice-premier-liu-appeases-tech-firms-backs-overseas-listings/ Chinese Vice Premier Liu He leaves the U.S. Trade Representative’s office after a morning round of talks on the second day of the latest trade talks in Washington, U.S., May 10, 2019. REUTERS/Leah Millis/Files Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register SHANGHAI, May 17 (Reuters) – Chinese Vice Premier Liu He made soothing […]]]>

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He leaves the U.S. Trade Representative’s office after a morning round of talks on the second day of the latest trade talks in Washington, U.S., May 10, 2019. REUTERS/Leah Millis/Files

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SHANGHAI, May 17 (Reuters) – Chinese Vice Premier Liu He made soothing comments to tech executives on Tuesday, saying the government supported the development of the sector and public listings of tech companies, further signs that the crackdown of the sector is diminishing.

Liu was speaking at a meeting convened by China’s top political advisory body, the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC).

Footage of the meeting released by CCTV showed the founders of search engine giant Baidu Inc (9888.HK) and mobile security software maker Qihoo 360 (601360.SS) – Robin Li and Zhou Hongyi, respectively – present, confirming a Reuters report.

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The unprecedented regulatory crackdown, which began in late 2020, has hit Chinese tech companies and rattled markets, causing companies to lose billions of dollars in market value.

Hong Kong- and U.S.-listed shares of Chinese tech companies rose on Tuesday after the meeting was announced.

Liu told the meeting that China would seek to “properly manage” the relationship between the government and the market.

The country will support tech companies seeking to register both at home and abroad and will also seek to support the healthy development of the platform economy, state broadcaster CCTV said.

The platform economy refers to digital platforms, including those used to trade online, a major driver of economic activity.

Liu’s comments come as COVID-19 restrictions and other measures to combat the pandemic have taken their toll on businesses and supply chains across a range of sectors, adding to fears that the economy will not continue. ° 2 world may contract in the second quarter.

Beijing has set a growth target of 5.5% this year, which private economists say will be difficult to achieve without significant government support. Read more

At Tuesday’s meeting, Liu also said China wants the battle for “key core technologies” to be well fought, CCTV added.

The meeting was convened to discuss how to promote the development of the digital economy and was attended by nearly 100 members, the broadcaster said.

Citi said in a research note that the meeting suggested another positive regulatory signal for the platform economy and a “supportive attitude” for internet companies seeking to list in foreign markets.

Baidu’s Li and Qihoo 360’s Zhou are members of the CPPCC, which brings together prominent figures from business, arts and academia to discuss issues with the Chinese Communist Party.

Baidu and Qihoo 360 did not respond to requests for comment.

Beijing had sought to rein in a range of private industries as part of a campaign to crack down on violations of anti-monopoly regulations and data privacy rules, among others, as well as to close a widening wealth gap that threatened the legitimacy of the power of the Communist Party. as part of a “common prosperity” campaign.

But restrictions on e-commerce, private education and the real estate sector have taken their toll on the economy, and since the start of the year China has eased some of the measures while battling tough COVID lockdowns.

Liu has been at the forefront of government efforts to reassure the private sector.

Last month, China’s powerful Politburo, in a meeting chaired by Chinese President Xi Jinping, said it would step up policy support for the economy, including the platform economy. Read more

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Reporting by Binbin Huang and Brenda Goh; Additional reporting by Yingzhi Yang, Josh Ye, Julie Zhu, Sophie Yu and Eduardo Baptista; Editing by Edwina Gibbs, Frank Jack Daniel and Himani Sarkar

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Uyghurs in exile use art to fight cultural genocide in China — Radio Free Asia https://songhaizeng.com/uyghurs-in-exile-use-art-to-fight-cultural-genocide-in-china-radio-free-asia/ Sat, 14 May 2022 10:50:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/uyghurs-in-exile-use-art-to-fight-cultural-genocide-in-china-radio-free-asia/ Classical performing artist Shohret Tursun said he realized early on that his native Uyghur culture was on the brink of obliteration in Xinjiang, as he watched in horror as fellow musicians and other friends Uighurs being detained or disappeared by Chinese authorities as of 2017. From his exile in Australia, Tursun has done his best […]]]>

Classical performing artist Shohret Tursun said he realized early on that his native Uyghur culture was on the brink of obliteration in Xinjiang, as he watched in horror as fellow musicians and other friends Uighurs being detained or disappeared by Chinese authorities as of 2017.

From his exile in Australia, Tursun has done his best to counter China’s efforts to obliterate Uyghur culture by creating artistic works that government policies could not destroy.

On September 2, 2018, he raised the curtains for the Twelve Muqam Festival at the Riverside Theater in Sydney, where he performed ‘Rak Muqam’, the first suite of ‘Twelve Muqam’, a quintessential Uyghur work that includes sung poetry , stories and dancing.

In doing so, Tursun perpetuates a thousand-year-old musical tradition. Until this day, muqam had never been performed on a major stage in Australia.

Tursun is part of a group of Uyghur artists, now living in different parts of the world, who are all working to preserve their identity and culture and bring more attention to the plight of their people.

A time of relentless darkness

Tursun, who plays several instruments including the Uyghur dutar and sattar, is joined by singer Rahima Mahmut in the UK and artist Gulnaz Tursun (no relation to Shohret Tursun) in Kazakhstan to use art to fend off a sense of hopelessness that permeates the Uyghur exile community.

The three expressed similar sentiments about the purpose of their works in interviews with RFA, saying it was their duty to instill hope and confidence in Uyghurs through their performances and artistic creations.

Shohret Tursun, who has lived in Australia since 1999, said he has dedicated his life to preserving and spreading cultural relics such as the “Twelve Muqam”, which is a symbol of the Uyghur nation. He has performed in Australia, Japan and other countries. His Australian Uyghur Muqam Ensemble’s performance in Sydney on July 20, 2019 was streamlined by Uyghurs around the world.

Mahmut sings mournful melodies from Xinjiang to give voice to speechless Uyghurs. And Gulnaz Tursun creates works of art on canvas to inspire Uyghur teenagers to hope for a brighter future in a time of unrelenting darkness.

Since 2017, Chinese authorities have detained around 1.8 million Uyghurs and other indigenous Turkic peoples in a vast network of internment camps for “re-education”, while others outside prisons and camps live under constant high-tech surveillance and control.

“The Chinese Communist Party has covered our motherland with blood,” said Shohret Tursun in a speech at the opening ceremony of the Muqam Ensemble.

“China is oppressing us to an unprecedented level, restricting our religion, banning our language, devastating our culture and our arts. They are murdering our Uyghur artists. Today we have done all we can to found the Uyghur Muqam Ensemble of Australia to honor our ancestors and blaze a new trail for our descendants.

Tursun told RFA that he hopes to inspire a new generation of Uyghur artists around the world to carry on the torch of Uyghur musical and singing traditions.

Uyghur musician Shohret Tursun (C) performs on stage with a band in an undated photo. Photo courtesy of Shohret Tursun

“Music is a tool”

As well as being an entertainer, Rahima Mahmut is the British representative to the World Uyghur Congress and adviser to the Inter-Parliamentary Alliance on China, an international cross-party alliance of lawmakers and parliamentarians fighting against the rise of authoritarian China. .

For 20 years, Mahmut has used his artistry to raise awareness of the Uyghur voice through music, while bringing the crisis in Xinjiang to international attention.

“There’s no place like a person’s home,” she said. “You can’t compare [home] to something else. It has been five years since my contact with my family was cut off. Now I can’t even remember the faces of the people I love the most, but music is a tool that allows me to turn pain into strength.

Mahmut said she had always loved singing, but majored in petrochemical engineering at Dalian University of Technology near China’s Pacific coast. While looking for a job after graduation, she experienced first-hand the unequal treatment of Uyghurs by Chinese state institutions.

She planned to work in Urumqi (in Chinese, Wulumuqi), but was unable to find a job there due to severe state discrimination against Uyghurs. She also couldn’t find an acceptable job offer in her hometown of Ghulja (Yining).

But it was the massacre of young Uighurs in Ghulja, where she was born and raised, on February 5, 1997, that prompted her decision to leave Xinjiang for the UK.

“The hope for the preservation of our people, the preservation and flourishing of our culture and history, and the future existence of our homeland, can be a reality if we fight for these ideals in our lifetime,” Mahmut told RFA. “That’s why I always say despair is of the devil. We have to keep hope alive. Our arts give us hope.

“There is a proverb with us: despair is the work of the devil! she says. “Our art also gives us hope, so I have tried to give hope and confidence to our people in these times of tribulation through art and performance.”

Mahmut, who has lived in the UK since 2000, has performed Uyghur songs at major concerts and cultural festivals in the UK, Europe and the US.

She says her life as an activist began on her first day in the UK, when she explained the Uyghur persecution to her taxi driver.

Singer Rahima Mahmut sings a Uyghur song in an undated photo.  Photo courtesy of Rahima Mahmut
Singer Rahima Mahmut sings a Uyghur song in an undated photo. Photo courtesy of Rahima Mahmut

Symbolic songs

Today, Mahmut speaks about the Uyghur genocide with representatives of the British government, members of Parliament, representatives of Jewish, Muslim and Christian institutions, leading British universities, media such as the BBC and Al Jazeera and directors of documentaries.

She also worked as an interpreter at the Uighur Court in London, which issued a non-binding decision on December 9, 2021 that China was committing genocide against Uighurs and other Turks in Xinjiang.

Mahmut said his urgency to showcase the beauty of Uyghur art and music to the world intensified in 2017 when the Chinese government’s forced assimilation campaign began in earnest.

Besides performing on stage in the Uyghur language, Mahmud has also translated the powerful messages of Uyghur songs, for example explaining the importance of grief expressed in the lyrics.

She said she recently released a recording of the Uyghur folk song “Lewen Yarlar” (Beautiful Lovers) to remind her audience of the suffering that Uyghurs are going through and their continued love for their homeland.

The song describes the life of Uyghur refugees after fleeing Chinese communist aggression and oppression.

“‘Lewen Yarlar’ is one of those symbolic songs,” Mahmut said. “The lyrics say, ‘We have found a place in the mountains, finding none in the garden, refusing to bow to the enemy.'”

One of the most powerful songs that Mahmut often sings during his performances is “Yearn for Freedom”. The song was adopted from a poem by the late Uyghur poet, writer and political thinker Abdurehim Otkur (1923-1995), a towering figure in modern Uyghur history whose ideas about the struggle for national freedom still resonate among the Uyghur people.

Otkur expressed the Uyghur’s desire for freedom:

I have neither patience nor indulgence,
A boiling pot is now my beating heart,
An erupting volcano is my heart’s desire
From this volcano I yearn for freedom.

The digital artwork of Uyghur artist Gulnaz Tursun
Uyghur artist Gulnaz Tursun’s digital artwork “Remember Who You Are”. Photo courtesy of Gulnaz Tursun

The Uyghur spirit

Visual artist Gulnaz Tursun, born into a family of Uyghur intellectuals in the village of Bayseyit in Almaty, Kazakhstan, said she also wanted to inspire confidence in young Uyghurs through her artistic creations and encourage them to believe in the coming.

“Believe, the dawn of freedom will come!” Gulnaz Tursun said when asked what message she wants her paintings to convey to Uyghurs.

“I want to give our children the confidence that we are not helpless, that the Uyghurs are also a great people who have built powerful empires in history, and that the Uyghurs will be able to overcome these difficult times and have a future of freedom,” she said.

After graduating from a Uyghur high school in her village, Gulnaz Tursan attended the Ural Tansykbayev Institute of Crafts and Arts in Almaty in 2002 and was admitted to the design faculty of the Academy the same year. Kazakh architects and construction. She graduated with honors and embarked on a career in the art world, participating in numerous exhibitions of works by young artists.

Speaking about the impact of the Uighur genocide on her work, she said the darkness that has descended on Uighurs in Xinjiang prompted her to change her style to one that seeks to inspire optimism and confidence. in the future of the Uyghurs.

During this process, she said, she created and distributed a number of inspiring digital works on social media, including “Hope”, “Don’t Forget Your Identity”, “Spring”, ” The Cute Child of My Motherland’s Free Future”. and “Unit”.

With her painting “Spring”, for example, Tursun said she wanted to convey the powerful message that the dark clouds in the sky will disappear and blue skies will come.

“Our birds will fly high and free again. Our fruit trees will bloom again. And we will enjoy the fruits of freedom again,” she said.

Tursun’s previous artistic creations depicted the daily life of Uyghurs, such as a woman fetching water or having a conversation over tea. But since 2017, her paintings have focused on “inspiring and motivating young people to have faith in a bright future by reminding them of our nation’s glorious history”, she said.

“In order to have a positive impact on our young generation, every good thing starts with confidence, so I created designs with confidence-boosting slogans like ‘Have faith, the dawn of freedom will come'”, she said.

“I created these works of art to inspire confidence in our freedom for the future generation,” she said. “These artworks I created are all based on the Uyghur spirit and Uyghur characteristics.”

Translated by RFA’s Uyghur Service. Written in English by Roseanne Gerin.

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Photographing Chinese Cities and Chinese Identity – SupChina https://songhaizeng.com/photographing-chinese-cities-and-chinese-identity-supchina/ Thu, 12 May 2022 16:56:18 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/photographing-chinese-cities-and-chinese-identity-supchina/ “China Dream”: Photographing Chinese Cities and Chinese Identity – SupChina Jump straight to content Search any company based in China Search any company based in ChinaZhejiang Geely Holding GroupChina Development Bank International InvestmentCASILBYD automaticBeiGene (Beijing)Beijing Pingxin Media CultureBeijing JD36Kr holdingsBaidu (China)Qianjin Network Information Technology (Shanghai)GAIGAVISHINTaobao China Holding (Hong Kong)Huaneng Power InternationalWe drivemiHoYoMobile CheetahCALBZTO-ExpressChina Aluminum CompanyRYB […]]]>




“China Dream”: Photographing Chinese Cities and Chinese Identity – SupChina























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for the first time we can name an artist who created bark paintings in Arnhem Land in the 1910s https://songhaizeng.com/for-the-first-time-we-can-name-an-artist-who-created-bark-paintings-in-arnhem-land-in-the-1910s/ Wed, 11 May 2022 03:10:23 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/for-the-first-time-we-can-name-an-artist-who-created-bark-paintings-in-arnhem-land-in-the-1910s/ This article by Joakim Goldhahn, Rock Art Australia Ian Potter Kimberley Chair at UWA, Gabriel Maralngurra, Co-convener, Injalak Arts, Indigenous Knowledge, Luke Taylor Adjunct Fellow, Place, Evolution and Rock Art Heritage Unit at Griffith University and Australian National University, Paul SCTaçon, Rock Art Research Chair and Director of the Rock Art Place, Evolution and Heritage […]]]>

This article by Joakim Goldhahn, Rock Art Australia Ian Potter Kimberley Chair at UWA, Gabriel Maralngurra, Co-convener, Injalak Arts, Indigenous Knowledge, Luke Taylor Adjunct Fellow, Place, Evolution and Rock Art Heritage Unit at Griffith University and Australian National University, Paul SCTaçon, Rock Art Research Chair and Director of the Rock Art Place, Evolution and Heritage Unit (PERAHU) at Griffith University and Sally K. May, Associate Professor at the University of Adelaide was originally published in The conversation May 11.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers are advised that this article contains images and names of deceased persons.

For Australian art students and art collectors around the world, Arnhem Land is synonymous with bark painting: sheets of tree bark carefully prepared as a canvas for painting by Aboriginal artists.

Bark painters such as John Mawurndjul and Yirawala are among Australia’s most renowned and internationally sought-after artists.

When the market for bark paintings emerged in the early 20th century, recording the names of individual artists was far from the collector’s mind. Museums and art galleries are full of ancient works of art, sometimes attributed to particular “clans” or geographical areas, but rarely featuring the names of the artists.

These collections are usually named after the collector rather than the creators. One of these collections, the Spencer/Cahill Collection at Museums Victoria, is the focus of our ongoing research project.

The Spencer/Cahill collection is extensive and includes many valuable objects collected by Sir Baldwin Spencer during his visit to Oenpelli (Gunbalanya), Northern Territory in 1912. He later acquired other works of art and objects through his contact “in the field”, buffalo shooter Paddy Cahill. .

The main focus of our project is the approximately 170 bark paintings commissioned from Oenpelli between 1912 and 1922.

Earlier bark paintings in museum collections were usually removed from bark huts found by explorers and collectors on their travels. Spencer and Cahill went a step further by commissioning bark paintings from artists: these works represent the birth of the Aboriginal art movement of bark painting.

Spencer’s early collecting experiments had been conducted to document – as Spencer and others have described it – a “doomed race” before it died out.

In Oenpelli, Spencer was mesmerized by local artists who decorated their stringy bark cabins with paintings of animals and spirit beings, which resemble paintings found in nearby rock shelters.

He compared the delicate lines of the artworks with “civilized” Japanese or Chinese artworks and concluded that the local bark paintings were:

“so realistic, still admirably expressing the characteristic features of the drawn animal, that anyone familiar with the original can immediately identify the drawings”.

Meeting Spencer led him to reconfigure his perception of Aboriginal art towards a more aesthetic appreciation. At Oenpelli, he selected a handful of the most skilled artists to paint him a series of bark paintings.

He left with 50 works. Over the next few years, around 120 more barques were sent to Melbourne.

Spencer did not record the artist’s name for each painting. But, thanks to an unpublished interview from 1967, we can now successfully link the bark paintings in this collection to an individual artist.

Paddy Compass Namadbara

Paddy Compass Namadbara (c. 1892-1978) is remembered by people of western Arnhem Land as a skilled artist, a “clever man”, a strong community leader and a family man.

During the 1950s and 1960s he spent much of his time in Minjilang (Croker Island), where he often painted alongside contemporary artists such as Yirawala and Jimmy Midjaumidjau.

In 1967 he was visited by researcher Lance Bennett, who was there to collect bark paintings and information for a book he was writing on contemporary Aboriginal art.

During these interviews, Namadbara casually identified his own works in a book published by Baldwin Spencer in 1914, Native tribes of the Northern Territory of Australia. One work features a barramundi, another a swamp hen, black sea bream and hand painted stencils.

Bennett commissioned Namadbara to recreate this 1912 painting, a painting now in the Bennett Collection at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra.

Bennett took the time to ask Namadbara about his personal experiences of Spencer’s visit to Oenpelli in 1912. Namadbara said Spencer had selected artists create bark paintings on small, portable sheets of bark , which they had never done before. This transformed traditional bark hut paintings into a new medium: bark paintings.

Cahill, who acted as a go-between, is remembered by Namadbara as asking Aborigines to get rid of their Western clothes so that Spencer could film and photograph “properly old-fashioned” ceremonies.

Spencer asked Namadbara to cross his hands when he created his bark hand stencils featuring the swamp hen and black seabream, which the artist found peculiar. They asked the artists to leave some of the paintings undecorated, so the designs would show up better in the photographs.

Payment for the 50 bark paintings consisted of one sack of tobacco and two sacks of flour.

Continuous connection

The master artists who created works for early collectors deserve recognition, as do the vital links that remain between the paintings and the communities from which they were acquired.

Gabriel Maralngurra, Namadbara’s grandson and one of the researchers on this project, explains:

these paintings they remain part of us, part of our community. No matter how far away they are, we always keep them close.”

Being able to identify artists in this collection and other museums revitalizes the importance of these works of art to contemporary First Nations communities, artists and their families.

It also helps cultural institutions better understand the significance and ongoing cultural connections to these collections – collaboratively charting a path for this invaluable Australian heritage.

Caption for painting at top of page: The barramundi barramundi painting that Namadbara created for Spencer at Oenpelli in 1912 and identified in the interview with Lance Bennett in 1967, now in the Victoria Spencer Museums/ Cahill Collection (object X 19909).

Homepage thumbnail caption: Paddy Compass Namadbara recreating the 1912 bark painting on Minjilang (Croker Island) in 1967, photographed by Lance Bennett. Estate of Lance Bennett, courtesy of Barbara Spencer.

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Westborough company offers acupuncture healing https://songhaizeng.com/westborough-company-offers-acupuncture-healing/ Sat, 07 May 2022 17:15:08 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/westborough-company-offers-acupuncture-healing/ Joe Foley is part of the Ancient Wisdom Healing Arts team. (Picture/submitted) WESTBOROUGH – For thousands of years people have used acupuncture to cure their ailments. Now here in central Massachusetts, the practice is gaining momentum, according to Joe Foley of Ancient Wisdom Healing Arts, which offers acupuncture treatments, Tai Chi and Qigong sessions. “A […]]]>
Joe Foley is part of the Ancient Wisdom Healing Arts team. (Picture/submitted)

WESTBOROUGH – For thousands of years people have used acupuncture to cure their ailments.

Now here in central Massachusetts, the practice is gaining momentum, according to Joe Foley of Ancient Wisdom Healing Arts, which offers acupuncture treatments, Tai Chi and Qigong sessions.

“A lot of people come to acupuncture because they think traditional medicine has failed them,” Foley said in a recent interview. “So when they come to see us, they feel they have nothing to lose.”

An estimated 36% of adults in the United States use complementary and alternative medicine, according to a survey by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, a component of the National Institute of Health (NIH).

Acupuncture, aimed at balancing the flow of energy in the body, is one of the most common forms of alternative medicine. And as more insurance companies realize that acupuncture is a cost-effective modality and more of their enrollees seek coverage, it becomes more affordable to more people.

Foley is a 2021 graduate of the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Science. He has since joined the team at Ancient Wisdom, which is 17 and led by Foley’s professional partner and mentor, Lisa Spellman. Lisa Spellman also attended the New England School of Acupuncture and has extensive experience in the medical industry, having been on staff at Boston Medical Center (as an acupuncturist) for 10 years in oncology, pediatrics, and family medicine.

Ancient Wisdom recently moved to its current location Westborough after operating in Southborough.

“It’s a very relaxing space”

On a typical day inside Ancient Wisdom, patients arrive for appointments around 10 a.m. and drop into one of three rooms, where they are interviewed and then treated. “It’s a very relaxing space with soft lighting,” Foley said. “When you walk into our practice, you feel calm.”

“Most people don’t even feel the needles going in,” Foley said. And in truth, the practice predates needles. There is evidence for acupuncture that dates back 5,000 years and involves many other modalities to support the flow of energy in each individual.

At Ancient Wisdom, Foley said they treat everyone from pediatric to geriatric patients. Most suffer from some form of pain.

Spellman treats patients with many issues, including digestive issues, hormonal imbalances, cancer, and an assortment of other chronic conditions.

Foley said the most common question asked by the public is “Does acupuncture really work?” »

“We can treat a wide range of things that people don’t know about,” he said, adding that “Chinese medicine, which includes acupuncture, is the oldest and most widely practiced medicine in the world.” .

“People have been doing this for a long time,” he said.

Learn more

The risks of acupuncture are low, and common side effects can include minor pain and bruising.

Most acupuncture practitioners use single-use disposable needles to minimize the risk of infection.

With patients seeking care and getting results, Foley predicts plenty of room for expansion in Ancient Wisdom’s future.

Ancestral wisdom is located at 69 Milk Street, Suite 205 in Westborough.

For more information, call 508-871-6035 or 508-460-0444.

Business Profiles are advertising features designed to provide general information and information about Community Advocate Advertisers.

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Herb Alpert Prize in the Arts Announces 2022 Winners – The Hollywood Reporter https://songhaizeng.com/herb-alpert-prize-in-the-arts-announces-2022-winners-the-hollywood-reporter/ Tue, 03 May 2022 22:47:45 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/herb-alpert-prize-in-the-arts-announces-2022-winners-the-hollywood-reporter/ In its 28th year of unrestricted giving supporting artists in a variety of fields, the Herb Alpert Prize for the Arts has announced its 10 winners for 2022, honoring creatives working in film/video, visual arts, music, theater and dance. “The 10 artists we celebrate this year are explorers, unafraid of the unknown,” says Alpert, legendary […]]]>

In its 28th year of unrestricted giving supporting artists in a variety of fields, the Herb Alpert Prize for the Arts has announced its 10 winners for 2022, honoring creatives working in film/video, visual arts, music, theater and dance.

“The 10 artists we celebrate this year are explorers, unafraid of the unknown,” says Alpert, legendary trumpeter, multiple Grammy-winning artist and co-founder of A&M Records.

In 2021, the number of awards doubled, a decision that was made during the pandemic in order to increase its support for artists in these difficult economic times. “We doubled the number of recipients,” says Alpert, explaining, “Artists are the heart and soul of the country. As my friend Sir Ken Robinson says, “Creativity is as important as literacy”. This whole country and this world has been developed by creative people and creativity is a big deal.

Each award is selected by a different panel of three judges who are experts in their field and Alpert takes no part in the review process. “I stay in my own lane – I paint and I sculpt and I make my music,” says Alpert. “I want [the awards] be completely legitimate. It was chosen by some really qualified people and they review the awards pretty thoroughly and I’m still happy with the outcome.

This year’s winners are Yanira Castro and nia love in the field of dance; Bani Khoshnoudi and Terence Nance (film/video); Tomeka Reid and Cory Smythe (music); Virginia Grice and Aleshea Harris (theater); and Guadalupe Maravilla and Martine Syms (visual arts). Syms’ feature debut, The African Desperaterecently performed at New York’s New Directors, New Films fest.

“The ten artists, each with their own unique voice, share a number of factors: they work across genres; they see the audience as participants; they provocatively connect the past to the present to imagine a new future,” said Irene Borger, director of the Herb Alpert Award in the Arts, in a statement.

The awards were created by Alpert and his wife, singer Lani Hall, who are the founders of the Herb Alpert Foundation, which since 1985 has given more than $200 million to philanthropic causes.

Each winner receives $75,000 in unrestricted funds as well as a residency at CalArts, which administers the award. Notable past recipients of the award include performance artist Taylor Mac, playwright Suzan-Lori Parks, and artists Carrie Mae Weems, Kerry James Marshall, Cai Guo-Qiang, Sharon Lockhart, and Simone Leigh (the first black woman to portray the United States with a solo pavilion at the Venice Biennale.)

The awards will be officially presented on Wednesday, May 4 in a virtual event starting at 2:00 p.m. PT.

Alpert, who turned 87 on March 31, spoke further with The Hollywood Reporter on his current plans, what Sam Cooke taught him and on his next concert tour, after canceling “a slew of concerts” in the middle of the pandemic. the the tour starts June 2 in San Diego at Humphrey’s Concerts by the Bay and includes an evening at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica on December 17.

THR also takes a look at the award finalists.

So you’re back on the road this year.

My wife and I are doing 52 concerts this year. In fact, we are booked until 2023. We are going to London where we play at Ronnie Scott. I’m looking forward to that one. It is a famous jazz club in London. Everyone played it – all the big ones and almost the big ones. And we have already had to postpone it twice. It has been sold out for two years now.

How is your show?

It’s very spontaneous even though I’m doing a Tijuana Brass medley and my wife who is a world class soloist, she’s doing a little Brasil ’66 medley and a few other songs. It’s a little tight and loose at the same time. I’ll be playing the Tijuana Brass medley pretty much how people would like to hear it and other than that it’s pretty spontaneous. It’s not clean and orderly. It is what it is when it happens.

Alpert Grass
Courtesy of Dewey Nicks

Are you working on a new album?

I brought out one [2021’s Catch the Wind] and I am at the tail of another. This is what allows me to function properly. I love making music. I love to play the trumpet. I’ve been doing it since I was 8 years old and it’s a passion. I don’t do it for any other reason. I became the public of my own work. I continue where I can get to that place where it makes me feel good.

I learned from Sam Cooke years and years ago – although he didn’t really teach me that – it had to feel good and he was very spontaneous. He was very [about that]. He used to carry a notebook with lyrics and every once in a while he would come up to me and say, “What do you think of these lyrics?” He showed me those lyrics and I thought, “That’s the most cheesy thing I’ve ever seen.” [The lyric was] “The Cokes are in the cooler and blah blah blah”, you know. I didn’t tell him how I really felt. But I said, “What are these songs like? What is the melody? And he picked up his guitar and started playing this song [“Having a Party”] and I was like “Holy shit”. He turned those corny lyrics into something truly magical. Sam was passionate about what he was doing. He was sincere. He was genuine. I’ve learned over the years that it’s not what you do, it’s how you do it. I think that’s the art. People don’t listen with their ears. They listen with their soul and heart.

Are you finding a new audience for your music today?

It’s amazing – you’d think it’s the blue-haired ensemble coming at us. It’s the spectrum. I have kids who come to see me and some of my music is on TikTok which is really interesting because a teenager covered a song I did on the album Whipped cream and other delicacies called “Ladyfingers”, which I did 50 years ago. I don’t know if you would call it viral but hundreds of different thumbnails have been made of this song. So it was a really interesting ride.

“Ladyfingers” is completely instrumental, isn’t it?

Yes. What’s a bit unique is that I’m the only artist to have had a number one song as an instrumentalist. [1979’s “Rise”, 1965’s “Taste of Honey”, and 1967’s “Casino Royale” and “A Banda”] and as a singer [1968’s “This Guy’s In Love With You”]. And this song [“This Guy’s In Love With You”] I did it for a TV show just because the director said, “Why don’t you try to sing me a song. I won’t have to photograph you with a trumpet in your mouth all the time. My good friend Burt Bacharach gave me this fabulous song. I asked him if there was a song he found himself whistling in the shower and maybe it was a song he thought I could handle. He sent me the song. I called Hal David because the lyrics needed to be changed and I did it on the show. Two weeks later, he was number one in the country. People come to me over the years to tell me how much they love it and nine times out of ten they say, “Well, we got married and we played that song.” I ask, “Are you still married?” And they would usually say, “Not with this creep.” But I made a lot of people happy with that particular song somehow.

Interview edited for length and clarity.

The 10 winners of the Herb Alpert Prize in the Arts for 2022

Dance

Yanira Castro, an interdisciplinary artist and choreographer based in Brooklyn, works on a podcast, Last Audience: A Performance Podcastto be published before the mid-term elections of 2022 which will call “listeners to choreographic action, considering the transmission of gesture and embodiment as a political collective action”.

New York-based choreographer, director and educator, nia love, is planning a tour of her multimedia performance installation, UNDER-currentsin the US and UK, starting at WaterWorks Harlem Stage this fall.

Movie/Video

Bani Khoshnoudi, a filmmaker and artist based in Brookyn and Mexico City, has an upcoming photography and film exhibition at the Museo Experimental El Eco in Mexico City called El Chinero, a cerro fantasmaabout a site in the Baja California desert where a group of Chinese immigrants died in the early 1900s.

Terence Nance, an artist based in Los Angeles, is working on the second season of his television series, Random acts of theftas well as an upcoming debut LP, Vortex.

Music

Chicago-based cellist, improviser, composer and organizer Tomeka Reid is the 2022 Artist-in-Residence of the Moers Jazz Festival and also hosts the 8th Annual Chicago Jazz String Summit.

Astoria, New York-based pianist, improviser, and composer Cory Smythe is currently mixing a record of new solo and ensemble music, and teaching this summer as part of the New School’s Ensemble Evolution faculty.

Theater

Virginia Grice, an Austin-based theater artist, is currently working on a theatrical concert, Surf the currents of the wild windwith musical director Martha Gonzalez of the Grammy-winning group Quetzal and a transmedia project asian rasgos.

Aleshea Harris, a playwright based in Sun Valley, Calif., is working on commissions for the Manhattan Theater Club, Hermitage Greenfield Prize, Center Theater Group, Playwrights Horizons and Theater Royal Haymarket as well as a performance piece about necessity to fly.

visual arts

Brooklyn-based artist and healer Guadalupe Maravilla is currently showing a solo exhibition at MOMA titled Luz and Fuerzaa personal exhibition in Norway at the Henie Onstad Art Center titled Sound Botanyand a solo exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum titled Tierra Blanca Joven.

Martine Syms, a Los Angeles-based artist and filmmaker whose feature debut The Desperate African is the closing film of New Director New Films at Film at Lincoln Center/MOMA. His exhibition neural swamp opens at the Philadelphia Museum of Art on May 12, followed by performances Grio College (opening June 25 at the Hessel Museum of Art) and She’s mad season 1 (opening July 2 at MCA Chicago).

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Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness: A Scene From Marvel’s Latest Movie Causes Backlash in China https://songhaizeng.com/doctor-strange-in-the-multiverse-of-madness-a-scene-from-marvels-latest-movie-causes-backlash-in-china/ Mon, 02 May 2022 04:53:14 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/doctor-strange-in-the-multiverse-of-madness-a-scene-from-marvels-latest-movie-causes-backlash-in-china/ A scene from strange doctor in the multiverse of madness caused a backlash in China, potentially dashing hopes that it could become one of the few Marvel films to be released in the country. The film, starring Benedict Cumberbatch, has upset some in China over a scene that shows a newsstand for The old timesan […]]]>

A scene from strange doctor in the multiverse of madness caused a backlash in China, potentially dashing hopes that it could become one of the few Marvel films to be released in the country.

The film, starring Benedict Cumberbatch, has upset some in China over a scene that shows a newsstand for The old timesan international newspaper and media company that opposes the Chinese Communist Party.

Doctor Strange 2 is currently with Chinese authorities, who are reviewing it before approving its release in China, according to Deadline. The publication reported that the scene in question had “made waves on local social media.”

No Marvel movie has been released in China since 2019 Avengers: Endgame.

It is believed that preventing the release of Marvel films such as Black Widow, Eternals, Venom: Let There Be Carnage and Spider-Man: No Coming Home in the country are partly due to Black Widowthe depiction of communism and the critical comments on Beijing made by Eternals director Chloe Zhao.

Marvel has released the trailer for Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness in April.

Directed by Sam Raimi, the film brings back the character of Cumberbatch for the first Marvel movie after Spider-Man: No Coming Home.

It will also mark the return of Wanda Maximoff AKA Scarlet Witch (Elizabeth Olsen) for the first time since the Disney Plus series. Wanda Vision.

The trailer seems to debunk a theory that floated after Wanda Visionthe post-credits sequence of – that she will be a villain in Strange doctor 2.

Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness will be released in the UK on May 5 and in the US on May 6.

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ONE OR THE OTHER is releasing a new album, electronic? Popular? China-Chic cannot be limited https://songhaizeng.com/one-or-the-other-is-releasing-a-new-album-electronic-popular-china-chic-cannot-be-limited/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://songhaizeng.com/one-or-the-other-is-releasing-a-new-album-electronic-popular-china-chic-cannot-be-limited/ EITHER: Cross-border exploration cannot be limited THE EITHER is an independent electronic music group founded in New York in 2017 by Chinese musicians Zongli, Jiaju and Yang. The work of each member is clearly defined. Zongli composes, plays the keyboard and sings (vocal electronic mix), Jiaju plays the plucked string instrument (Electric Pipa) and Yang […]]]>

EITHER: Cross-border exploration cannot be limited

THE EITHER is an independent electronic music group founded in New York in 2017 by Chinese musicians Zongli, Jiaju and Yang. The work of each member is clearly defined. Zongli composes, plays the keyboard and sings (vocal electronic mix), Jiaju plays the plucked string instrument (Electric Pipa) and Yang plays the bowed string instrument (Electric Erhu). They each bring their own ideas to the collective and complement each other. Through exploring each other’s inspiration, they were finally able to create a style all their own. They described the group’s name, THE EITHER, as “an abstract description of this or that”.

Each of the members brought their own share of talent, professional training and reputation to the band. After four years of undergraduate studies in music composition and production and three years of postgraduate studies in electronic music design at the Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Zongli followed New York University, where he earned a master’s degree in film music. In 2016, his work Peace was performed at a summit at the UN headquarters. His music has been performed at New York Fashion Week for three consecutive years, and the films he has composed have been selected for the walking sticks and Tokyo International Film Festivals, etc. Jiaju, a graduate of Shanghai Theater Academy, is a professional Pipa player. Jiaju had the honor of performing at the Beijing Olympics in 2008, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and many NBA games. During the closing ceremony of the 2010 World Expo, Jiaju was invited to accompany the performance of the famous dancer Huang Doudou in the show Diversification during the closing ceremony of the 2010 World Expo. Yang, a graduate of the Xi’an Conservatory of Music specializing in Erhu, had the honor of performing at the National Center for the Performing Arts, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts at New York, and Carnegie Hall among others. In 2019, Yang became the only Chinese musician to perform at Afropunk, one of the biggest African-American music festivals in the world.

However, tradition is not the engine of these young people. They want to play music in an innovative way and usher in new times. “I had a band and wrote songs in high school. I wanted to be a rock producer and musician back then. But after seven years at the Shanghai Conservatory of Music, I gradually became more focused and determined to become a composer. “, said Zongli. mentioned. “I dream of composing a kind of music that occupies a space somewhere between the mainstream and the pioneering outer edges.”

At that time, Jiaju was studying arts management in the United States and working with industrial design majors to make an electric Pipa. “We all believe there is great potential for transforming traditional Chinese instruments into electronic instruments,” Jiaju said. After several years of research and development, it is no longer confined to an electric Pipa. His latest plucked string instrument is known as the Black Marrow – a combination of the essence of the Pipa and the guitar.

Jiaju met Zongli when she was looking for someone to compose for Electric Pipa. Their respective musical ideas immediately resonated and spawned their first mini-album, black silk. Audiences appreciated their innovative use of the pipa and the new ideas they brought to traditional music by black silkwho The Chinese press described as “refreshing”. Ultimately, the experience would lead them to Yang and the creation of their new band, THE EITHER.

The music and fashion communities immediately recognized the band’s unique and futuristic aesthetic ideas when they first appeared on the scene. Therefore, THE EITHER has been repeatedly invited to perform in some of the the New York one top live music venues including the Gramercy Theatre, Irving Square, Bowery Electric and The Bitter End. They have also been invited to perform at New York Fashion Week and Shanghai Fashion Week. ONE OR THE OTHER Reveriethe EP made in collaboration with the famous mobile game knightsbroadened the band’s reputation even further, bringing it to an idolatrous younger audience.

E myth: THE EITHER’s reiteration of the concept that everything is multi-faceted

After the release of the second full album E myth, THE EITHER, this four-year-old group, now has six singles, two albums, two mini albums and several music videos to its credit. His music is pioneering in its tonalities, musical themes and styles of interpretation.

Take the tone of the instrument, for example: traditional Chinese music and modern electronic music are seamlessly integrated. Singer Zongli is able to blend natural vocals with electronic vocals so harmoniously that they sound completely natural. “My natural voice is becoming more and more mechanized, while my electronic voice is becoming more and more humanized. The two so-called contradictory voices are now integrated into me. I really appreciate it because it’s unique and interesting” , Zongli said.

E myth is made up of 10 songs, with comparative even and odd numbers in concept. As the band explains, the “E” in E myth stands for odd numbers, an abstract concept that one can explain however one sees fit, while “myth” stands for even numbers, a concrete concept, most of which stems from mythology. Joshua Valleaua Grammy-nominated mixing and mastering engineer based in New York, is responsible for the post-production of the album. His deep knowledge of musical aesthetics and unrivaled mixing skills played a major role in bringing THE EITHER’s concept to fruition for their album.

Interestingly, THE EITHER’s performance in E myth is distinctly divided. The odd-numbered tracks use traditional vocals, Pipa and Erhu, or electronic rock music plus vocals, Pipa and Erhu with an outboard effects unit. The even-numbered tracks use futuristic electric vocals, the Black Marrow plucked string and the Pin Xian bowed string – all true masterpieces of cross-border integration. “Alone Deviate of course, the tenth track is an exception. Its first half is a traditional music performance while the second half is purely electronic. We integrated them like that deliberately,” explained THE EITHER. E myth is THE EITHER’s reiteration of the concept that “Essence is multiform and Extremity is illusory.

In fact, pioneer artists have been pursuing cross-border integration for some time, but with the improvement of the artistic senses of the public, pioneer art, which was previously only enjoyed by a limited group of people, has now become a valuable resource that deserves public attention because of its uniqueness. . The independent style of THE EITHER is not intentionally made to please the public. They also do well in film scores and game scores, which outsiders call “commercial music”. “THE EITHER’s main goal is not to limit ourselves. We have a very diverse style,” Yang said, “We can create scores for all kinds of films, such as serious dramas, comedies, action, animation, sci-fi and emotional films.”

“We don’t stick to tradition or innovation. You can see E myth that we are rooted in traditional music and electronic music, but what we pursue is the modernization and internationalization of traditional and electronic music. We also believe there is enough space in the music for us to explore the versatility of each form. If you define a form of music, you lose the sense of exploring it, as well as the possibility of developing it,” Zongli said.

SOURCE BE

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